The 25 Companies that Pay Interns the Most (start planning for summer 2018)

Salary is not the only index of worth, value, or skill. Happiness can be found below the poverty line, and time and meaning can be worth more than money.

That said, when this article came out, claiming that Internships at these 25 companies pay more than the average US salaryit seemed useful to ask…

Internships doing what?

A lot of things, it turns out. Some internships are specifically for students with specific engineering, programming, or quantitative business training, but many are not. Some are limited to specific majors. Many are not.

Many of these companies offer internships that English/CW majors can qualify for — if a job at a large company is what you want.

Some internship titles that English and CW majors should consider:

  • marketing or advertising
  • communications
  • public policy
  • client services
  • analyst (this word can mean a LOT of different things, some narrowly technical/quantitative, some not)
  • human resources
  • account services
  • content development
  • project management

And so on. If a job title grabs your attention, look at the requirements for the job. They may well be skills you have acquired in your major and work experience: communication, teamwork, organization, problem-solving.

As of the date of this blog post, 2017 summer interns are JUST starting their positions, and summer 2018 internships have mostly not been advertised yet. Some companies are still trying to fill a few last-minute summer 2017 positions, some are starting to hire for fall or spring semester interns, and some will start the summer 2018 recruiting process as early as August. If you have your sights on a prestigious internship for next summer, it’s worthwhile to start paying attention well before classes start, if you want to have a good shot at one of these highly competitive positions.

Some of these companies may be coming to the Business Career Fair, which will take place on September 19 and 20 at the ARC. Talking to a recruiter about an internship that you’ve already researched and started applying for can be a good way to set yourself apart.

So here are links to the internship programs of these 25 companies.

Facebook

Microsoft

ExxonMobil

Salesforce

Amazon

Apple

Bloomberg

Yelp

Yahoo

VMware

Google

NVIDIA

Intuit

Juniper Networks

Workday

BlackRock

Adobe

MathWorks

Qualcomm

Capital One

Chevron

Accenture

Deutsche Bank

AIG

Bank of America

If you’d like help with your resume, your job search strategy, preparing for the Business Career Fair or any parts of finding the right internship, feel free to call 217/333-4346 to set up an appointment with Kirstin Wilcox, Director of Internships.

Guest Post: Surviving the FOCUS Job Fair

By Ana V. Fleming, Communications Intern, Department of English

IMG_3446(1)Career fairs. Consistently throughout my three, going on four, years here at the University of Illinois, that phrase has terrified me–along with all the things that go with it: pressure, elevator pitches, resumes, business casual. However, after attending a number of career fairs on campus —and similar events, like corporate after-hours and part-time job fairs—I’ve grown less averse to the idea.

For instance, I recently attended the FOCUS part-time job and internship fair at the Illini Union as a senior in English. (I also attended the Department of Computer Science’s Corporate After Hours a couple of weeks ago, seeking out UI/UX design positions—I was even more of a fish out of water there!) At FOCUS, many of the students around me were from the College of Fine and Applied Arts, and many of the opportunities offered at the event were centered on graphic design (though, not all of them—there were opportunities for marketing, communications, videography, social media, and even content-development positions, among others that I probably missed). Personally, I was there seeking both writing positions and design positions; thus, I grew worried that the abundance of FAA students around me would overwhelm my chances of wrangling some of those design opportunities.

However, the fair wasn’t overly crowded, and the stakes were pretty low, so I decided to talk to as many of the represented companies and colleges (for instance, the College of ACES was there) as possible. As it turns out, most of the representatives were happy to speak with me, and each one that I spoke to took my resume for reference, regardless of whether or not they had any current openings that matched my skill set. At each booth, I asked about the kinds of jobs and internships the different companies had available, the expectations in terms of hours and pay, and their goals for the semester (or upcoming semesters). In return, they asked me about my familiarity with the company, my knowledge of certain software, and whether or not I was interested in the projects they were recruiting for.

While the fair represented around twenty companies, and I only had the time to talk to about eight of them, I could already perceive a wealth of opportunities. Everyone had been perfectly happy to talk to me, and no one made any assumptions about my competence in regards to writing or design—rather, they gave me the chance to discuss my experience and describe my capabilities. The event was pretty casual, and I walked out of the Illini Union Ballroom with the knowledge that, at the very least, I was exposed to some new opportunities, I had links to some applications in hand, and, through mere exposure and repetition, I was slightly less intimidated by career fairs and interview-style interactions than I had been walking in there (even IMG_3448(1)as a senior).

Enormous fairs like the Engineering Career Fair and Business Career Fair can be a lot to tackle at the beginning of the semester, but they are by no means the only opportunities to connect with companies. If you’re ever wondering whether or not you should attend a career fair, I’d suggest going for it, especially when smaller, more focused events like the aptly-named FOCUS are within your reach.

 

If It Matters for Your Life, It Can Matter for Your Career

Is volunteering part of your life? Have you always sought out service opportunities? Are you hoping to make it a part of your routine if it hasn’t been before?

Service can be a way of life, not just an extracurricular activity. A great way to explore careers in the nonprofit sector, jobs that involve making positive change in the world is to get involved. Here are some ways to do it.

  1. TOMORROW, Sept. 15, 10:30 – 1:30 in the Illini Union, the Community Service and Volunteer Fair will give you a chance to find out about the wealth of opportunities available on this campus and in this area.

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2.  Every semester, The Community Learning Lab in the School of Social work identifies projects that draw on the communication, research, and problem-solving skills of English/CW/ToE majors and matches those projects to interested students.

 Projects often include tasks like grant-writing, information gathering, web content development, marketing and outreach, event planning, and assessment.

Students should expect to spend no more than 25 hours over the course of the semester completing the project, which will include a brief self-assessment and reflection at the end.

To take part in this opportunity, send an email ssw-cll@illinois.edu, explaining that you are an English department major interested in working with Community Learning Lab partners.

You will receive a list of available projects and a link for signing up for the projects that interest you most.

3. The upcoming LAS in CU Internship Fair offers a wide range of internship opportunities for the spring and summer, many of them with local nonprofit agencies.

 

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What to Say When Anyone Asks, “What Are you Going to Do with a Degree In English?!?”

options-396267_1920“Oh, I dunno, maybe…UX analysis, law, screenwriting, medicine, public relations, diplomacy, teaching, fundraising, librarianship, grant-writing, journalism, nursing, arts administration, corporate learning and development, human resources, content strategy, video game development, translating and interpreting, television producing, educational technology, corporate recruiting, elective office, publishing, tech customer support, marketing, project management, video editing, SEO, media development, speech pathology, event planning, information science, school administration, public service, business consulting, advertising, nonprofit management…etc.

Every organization or business has problems that can only be solved with words. English and CW majors learn the skills to solve those problems.”

Want to figure out what kinds of problems you want to solve with words? Browse this website! It has lots of resources to help. Sign up for ENGL 199-CPH (Career Planning for Humanities Majors, CRN 50105). Sign up for the Alumni Mentoring Network. All those jobs listed above? Those are things English department alumni are currently doing, and they are eager to talk to students about their career paths. Make an appointment when you get to campus to meet with Kirstin Wilcox, Director of Internships (kwilcox@illinois.edu. 217/300-4305).