The 25 Companies that Pay Interns the Most (start planning for summer 2018)

Salary is not the only index of worth, value, or skill. Happiness can be found below the poverty line, and time and meaning can be worth more than money.

That said, when this article came out, claiming that Internships at these 25 companies pay more than the average US salaryit seemed useful to ask…

Internships doing what?

A lot of things, it turns out. Some internships are specifically for students with specific engineering, programming, or quantitative business training, but many are not. Some are limited to specific majors. Many are not.

Many of these companies offer internships that English/CW majors can qualify for — if a job at a large company is what you want.

Some internship titles that English and CW majors should consider:

  • marketing or advertising
  • communications
  • public policy
  • client services
  • analyst (this word can mean a LOT of different things, some narrowly technical/quantitative, some not)
  • human resources
  • account services
  • content development
  • project management

And so on. If a job title grabs your attention, look at the requirements for the job. They may well be skills you have acquired in your major and work experience: communication, teamwork, organization, problem-solving.

As of the date of this blog post, 2017 summer interns are JUST starting their positions, and summer 2018 internships have mostly not been advertised yet. Some companies are still trying to fill a few last-minute summer 2017 positions, some are starting to hire for fall or spring semester interns, and some will start the summer 2018 recruiting process as early as August. If you have your sights on a prestigious internship for next summer, it’s worthwhile to start paying attention well before classes start, if you want to have a good shot at one of these highly competitive positions.

Some of these companies may be coming to the Business Career Fair, which will take place on September 19 and 20 at the ARC. Talking to a recruiter about an internship that you’ve already researched and started applying for can be a good way to set yourself apart.

So here are links to the internship programs of these 25 companies.

Facebook

Microsoft

ExxonMobil

Salesforce

Amazon

Apple

Bloomberg

Yelp

Yahoo

VMware

Google

NVIDIA

Intuit

Juniper Networks

Workday

BlackRock

Adobe

MathWorks

Qualcomm

Capital One

Chevron

Accenture

Deutsche Bank

AIG

Bank of America

If you’d like help with your resume, your job search strategy, preparing for the Business Career Fair or any parts of finding the right internship, feel free to call 217/333-4346 to set up an appointment with Kirstin Wilcox, Director of Internships.

By the Numbers: English and Creative Writing Majors Get Jobs

.You don’t have to major in a quantitative or preprofessional field to be employable.

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has now collected campus-wide data, for the second year in a row, on what students plan to do when they graduate. The numbers in this chart are from the full report on the Illini Success survey for 2015-16.

Why Graduating Seniors Should Talk to the Director of Internships

1. Our department’s “Director of Internships” does a lot of other things, too: putting students in touch with helpful alumni, reviewing resumes, suggesting possible career paths, helping students articulate their skills.

2. There are jobs for people with English and Creative Writing skills, and Kirstin Wilcox can help point you towards them.

3. It will make your parents happy.

4. It’s really not as painful or awkward as you think it’s going to be.

5. It’s easier than locating a job cannon and more likely to succeed.

Forget Finding Your Passion

passiflora-588757_1920If you know what your passion is, stop reading this post and go pursue it. Go! Now! Enough procrastinating on the internet! Get started on the thing that you long for, that terrifies you, that is worth the inevitable sleepless nights and bouts of rejection. You know what you need to do, so get on with it. Seriously.

 

The rest of you?

Set passion aside for now. “Find your passion” is a worthy lifetime goal, but if you can’t yet envision even the haziest contours of what that passion might be, it’s not a particularly useful quest to start with.

  • Caring about something, does not necessarily mean caring about it enough to build a life around it.
  • “Passion” conveys a level of creativity, innovation, single-mindedness, and commitment that many well-lived, successful, happy lives don’t meet.
  • Your life experience to date may not have revealed the particular strengths or interests that will help you leave your mark on the world.

There are plenty of online tools to help you find your way to your “passion”–if that’s really how you want to frame the question of your post-graduation plans. Just google “find your passion,” and be wary of sites that are clearly trying to peddle the author’s book.

If you want some concrete next steps to take towards your future career, ponder less and do more.

Thinking about a career in [______________]? Look for a way (internship, volunteer work, part-time job) to give it a try.

Wondering if you have enough talent for [_____________] to make a go of it? Practice doing it, and put yourself out there in front of an audience sooner rather than later.

Curious about whether [_______________] would be something you’d be good at and enjoy? Find an online tutorial, take a class, use LinkedIn or the alumni mentoring network to find people who can tell you more about it.

Not even sure where to begin? Get involved with an RSO, work for a campus publication, sign up for a new activity, take the next volunteering opportunity that comes your way.

The more things you do, the more data points you’ll have to guide you to life after college. But don’t just frenetically do things: look for ways to learn from the experience you accrue.

  • what kinds of things are you good at without working at them or thinking too much about them?
  • what challenges prompt you to get obsessive and lose track of time?
  • what kinds of tedious chores are you willing to do that other people resist?
  • what kinds of people are you happiest working with?
  • what do you need to be reasonably happy?
  • what activities do you want to try that you haven’t yet?

Let your answers guide you to the next thing you try.

Your first job out of college probably won’t be your dream job. That’s okay. But the more you know about what you’re good at and what gives you satisfaction, the more likely you are to land in something that will help get you to where you want to be, even if you don’t know where that is yet.