Lightning Review: Text Analysis with R for Students of Literature

My undergraduate degree is in Classical Humanities and French, and like many humanities and liberal arts students, computers were mostly used for accessing Oxford Reference Online and double checking that “bonjour” meant “hello” before term papers were turned in. Actual critical analysis of literature came from my mind and my research, and nothing else. Recently, […]

New Digital Humanities Books in the Scholarly Commons!

Is there anything quite as satisfying as a new book? We just got a new shipment of books here in the Scholarly Commons that complement all our services, including digital humanities. Our books are non-circulating, so you cannot check them out, but these DH books are always available for your perusal in our space. Digital […]

An Obstacle and (Hopefully) a Solution in Digital Research

This post is part of an ongoing series about my research on conspiracy theories and the tools I use to pursue it. You can read Part I: What is a Conspiracy Theory and Part II: Why Are Conspiracy Theories So Compelling? on Commons Knowledge. Part of my research project, in which I am attempting to give an […]

Why Are Conspiracy Theories So Compelling?

In my last post, I described the first phase of my research, in which I am attempting to develop an empirically informed definition of ‘conspiracy theory’. In this post, I want to discuss the second focus of my research: why it is that conspiracy theories are so compelling for so many people. Although the specifics […]

What is a Conspiracy Theory?

Part of my internship at the Scholarly Commons will be a series of blog posts to describe my research and the different tools that I’ll be using to pursue it. In this first post, I’ll begin to give an account of my overall research project. Future posts will deal with other parts of the research […]