What to do over Fall Break

Fall Break is here — now what?

Aside from relaxing, eating and watching football (and maybe getting ready for finals?!), what else could/should you be doing?

If You Are Currently Applying to Law School

  1. If you are done with the LSAT, finish your applications!  If you have everything you need to apply there is no reason to procrastinate. This is a rolling admissions process — file your applications ASAP!
  2. If you are taking the December LSAT — keep studying!  A strong LSAT score helps both with admissions and scholarships! Set some goals for how many practice LSATs you can take over break and stick to it.
  3. If you are waiting on Letters of Recommendation, gently remind your recommenders (either via a phone call or email) that you want to submit your applications ASAP but cannot do so until LSAC/CAS receives all required letters of recommendation.
  4. Attend an Open House, or schedule a visit with law schools. (If you’re scheduling a visit, make sure the school is open and staffed during Thanksgiving week!)
    1. DePaul Law is hosting an Open House on Saturday, November 18. Click here for more details.
    2. For those of you applying to the University of Chicago, they will be holding an open house on Monday, November 20.  Click here to register for this event.
  5. Check deadlines for Early Decision!  While many schools list November 15 as their early decision deadline, several others allow early decision applications until December 1 or even Dec. 15.  Not sure about early decision? Click here for a PLAS blog post on the pros and cons of applying early decision.
  6. Complete your FAFSA.
  7. Did you know that you can already apply for scholarships sponsored by non-university sources? Take a look at the scholarship spreadsheet with over 250 options over on our Compass page–these have a variety of due dates and many are due by the end of the calendar year, so now is a great time to apply!

If You Are Not Yet Applying to Law School

  1. Study for finals and write those papers!  Your GPA is a very important part of the law school admissions and scholarship process!
  2. LSAT Prep. In general, we advise those planning to apply to law school next fall to take the June 2018 LSAT (unless study abroad prevents you from doing so). You should plan to spend approximately 4-6 months studying for the LSAT–so now is the time to prepare for that process. As you plan your schedule for Spring 2018, consider not overloading on courses since the time necessary for effective preparation equates to the time invested in a rigorous 3 credit class. Remember: the LSAT is NOT like the ACT or the SAT.  It does not test you on what you know.  Rather, it tests how you think.  It is important to determine how you plan to study for the LSAT (on your own, through a commercial prep company, etc.), and decide where you want to take the LSAT. To begin your research, go to the LSAC’s website for info on the LSAT, how to register and select a test site, and how to be successful on the test.
  3. Apply for Internships — Have you thought about what you will be doing next summer?  Are you looking into internships? Internships can be a great way to learn more about the legal system and the practice of law.  Do you need some suggestions on how and where to find an internship?  Check out this 2018 Internship Plan from our blog. We also recently posted several internships to our Facebook page. And remember: the PLAS Annual Internship Newsletter will be out and published on Compass the week of December 18!
  4. Network and conduct informational interviews. A great way to start to build your professional network and get to know various legal practice areas is to meet with lawyers! Do you or your parents know any lawyers? Are any of your friends’ parents lawyers? You can also use the alumni association directory to identify Illinois alumni who are lawyers. Ask a lawyer to spend 30 minutes doing an informational interview with you. Don’t be intimidated; this is an opportunity for you to buy him/her coffee and ask about their professional life. Here’s a resource for planning your informational interview. 
  5. Complete your FAFSA
  6. Apply for scholarships! We’ve included lots of scholarships for continuing undergraduate students. Take a look at the scholarship spreadsheet with over 250 options over on our Compass page–these have a variety of due dates and many are due by the end of the calendar year, so now is a great time to apply! Here are a few great undergrad scholarships with upcoming deadlines. Find these and over 200 more on our Scholarship Spreadsheet!
    1.  Ai Engstrom National Scholarship application is due December 1. 
    2. Bankruptcy Law Center Scholarship Contest application is due December 20.
    3. A Better America Scholarship Program application is due December 31.

Have a great break!

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email

Mark Your Calendars: Week of November 13

Pre-Law Events

Patent Bar Exam Session Nov 15, 2017   5:00 – 6:00 pm UPDATED LOCATION: ENGINEERING HALL 106B1

The patent bar exam is the required first step to becoming either a patent agent for the United States Patent & Trademark Office or a patent prosecutor/litigator as a practicing attorney. Students with a background in engineering and the sciences (such as biology, biochemistry, physics, chemistry, computer science) are eligible to sit for this exam. (To see all exam requirements, visit the link below).  Join us for this Patent Bar session to learn about the exam from an expert. Mark Dighton, Director of the Practicing Law Institute Patent Office Exam Course, will be here to answer all of your questions about the patent bar, including:

  • What exactly does the patent bar cover?
  • When and how often can you take it?
  • How do people prepare for the exam?
  • What is the format of the exam, and how are results received?
  • What is a passing score for the exam?

He’ll also answer any other questions you have about the patent bar exam. This session is specifically designed for those undergrad and graduate students in engineering, science, or technology disciplines who are eligible to sit for the patent bar. For a list of eligible majors or backgrounds visit  https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/OED_GRB.pdf This is a free event.

Today’s Personal Statement workshop is cancelled due to low enrollment. Explore our personal statement resources, including our video and handout, on the Pre-Law Compass page, and make an individual appointment for a personal statement review when you are ready.

College of Law Events–Pre-law students are invited!

From White House to City Hall: Thoughts on Lawyering in the Executive Branch will be presented by Edward N. Siskel, City of Chicago’s Corporation Counsel, on Nov. 14 from 12-1 pm. Mr. Siskel will share his thoughts on some of the challenges, rewards, and responsibilities that come with providing legal counsel to Executive Branch leadership on the federal and municipal levels. He offers a unique perspective on issues ranging from managing investigations into senior executive branch officials, preserving the independence of the Department of Justice, and defending sanctuary cities against the Trump Administration’s efforts to withhold federal grant funds. The lecture is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided to lecture attendees.

Other Campus Events

Career Center events of interest to pre-law students include the following list; check www.careercenter.illinois.edu for location & other details and to register.

  • Creating your powerful resume–Nov. 13 at 4:00 & Nov. 14 at 4:00
  • Professional branding & etiquette–Nov. 15 at 5:00
  • Resume, cover letter, LinkedIn reviews
    • Nov. 13 from 7-9 pm in Undergrad Library
    • Nov. 14 from 2-4:30 at Career Center
    • Nov. 14 from 5:30-7:30 at the Ike Room 1010A
    • Nov. 15 from 2-4:30 at Career Center
    • Nov. 15 from 7-9 in Undergrad Library
    • Nov. 16 from 2-4:30 at Career Center
    • Nov. 17 from 2-4:30 pm at Career Center
  Writer’s Workshop presents the following workshops. Click here for more information. 
  • Integrating sources: Paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting, Nov. 14 at 3:00
  • Writing personal statement, Nov. 16 at 3:00

Social Justice Education Paraprofessional Program is taking applicants!

The Department of Diversity and Social Justice Education (Diversity ED) is now taking applications for the Social Justice Education Paraprofessional (SJEP) program.  SJEP is designed to promote diversity and student leadership by providing intensive training for students in areas of knowledge, awareness, and skills related to issues of diversity and social justice. Social Justice Education Paraprofessionals serve as peer educators through facilitating workshops, class facilitation, allyship, and program development.  Students who are junior and seniors in the humanities and social sciences are encouraged to apple.  Click here to apply, or for more information: https://illinois.edu/fb/sec/9768586?referrer=

 

 

Internships, Scholarships, & Opportunities

Sidley Scholars Program–Juniors and Seniors planning on attending law school in the Fall of 2019: consider applying for the Sidley Austin LLP Summer Pre-Law Scholars Program. This program helps to subsidize the cost of LSAT Prep and offers possible additional scholarships.

Scholars will receive up to $2,500 in benefits to fund the LSAT, CAS credentialing, pay tuition in a commercial LSAT preparation course, as well as reimbursement for application and CAS fees for up to seven law schools.

Scholars further may be eligible to receive an additional $2,500 scholarship award, in two installments. Scholars will receive $1,250 when they have (1) successfully completed an approved LSAT preparatory course, (2) taken the LSAT, and (3) applied to at least five accredited law schools. Finally, each Scholar will receive a final $1,250 scholarship distribution once the Scholar has informed Sidley that he or she has been accepted to, and is committed to start law school at, an accredited law school and has attended the entire Sidley Scholars Summer Seminar in the summer immediately preceding the Scholar’s matriculation at that law school.

Click here for more information. Application materials are due Friday January 12!

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email

LSAT Prep Guidance for December & February

There are different strategies for LSAT Prep. If December is the first time you will be taking the LSAT, here are a few common sense pieces of advice to help you prepare.

A quick reminder on the LSAT’s format:

The test consists of five 35-minute sections of multiple-choice questions. Four of the five sections contribute to the test taker’s score. These sections include one Reading Comprehension section, one Analytical Reasoning section, and two Logical Reasoning sections. The unscored section, commonly referred to as the variable section, typically is used to pretest new test questions or to preequate new test forms. The placement of this section will vary. Identification of the unscored section is not available until you receive your score report.

A 35-minute, unscored writing sample is administered at the end of the test. Copies of your writing sample are sent to all law schools to which you apply.

Common Sense Advice for LSAT Prep:

1. Take a FULL LENGTH PRACTICE LSAT. Ideally, take multiple full length practice LSATs.

  • The LSAT will take often 4 to 5 hours depending on breaks. Whether it is through a prep class or studying on your own, take practice tests in a timed and distraction-free setting. One of the most difficult parts of the LSAT is endurance and sitting through the entire test. Full length practice tests will help prepare you.
  • The LSAC offers a free sample test (June 2007 exam). Click here to access the free practice test.
  • When you do a practice exam, do the writing portion! It’s easy to ignore this portion of the exam during your preparation, but it is a part of the test you have to do on test day. Click here to see the LSAC’s example writing topics.

2. It is highly discouraged to take the LSAT “cold” or without any studying.

  • All of your LSAT scores are sent to law schools. Law schools care if you prepared for the exam and that you put in your best effort for the exam. The LSAT is not an exam that you can walk into with minimal to no preparation.

3. Remember, the suggested amount of time to prepare for the LSAT is 4 to 6 months of regular studying.

  • The LSAT measures critical thinking skills, and while these skills CAN be learned, they usually take a lot longer to learn than fact-based knowledge. Four to six months of consistent studying for 10-15 hours a week is highly recommended in order to be fully prepared for this exam.

4. If you are not prepared for the exam, seriously consider whether or not you should take it or delay the test.

Here is the LSAC’s information about changing test centers, test dates and refunds for the December 2017 exam. Although the test center, test date change, and registration refund deadlines have already passed for the December 2017 exam, you can still withdraw from the exam until the day before. It may be better to withdraw than to go through with the test and achieve a low score.

Registration Refund (partial only) November 7, 2017
Registration Withdrawal (no refund) Regular administration: December 1, 2017
Spanish LSAT administration: November 17, 2017
Saturday Sabbath Observers administration: December 3, 2017

The next LSAT is Saturday February 10, 2018.

Regular Registration December 27, 2017
Regular Registration Accommodation Request December 27, 2017
Nonpublished Test Center Registration(additional fees apply) December 13, 2017
Late Registration—Published Test Centers only (additional fees apply) January 3, 2018
Late Registration Accommodation Request—Published Test Centers only (additional fees apply) January 3, 2018

Not taking the LSAT until next year?

Plan on attending the LSAT Prep Fair on February 6, 2018 to learn more about your test prep company options!

Taking the February 2018 LSAT? The test is only a few months away.

Pre-Law Advising Services is helping to organizing LSAT study groups for the February 2018 LSAT. We will organize groups based on the availability you specify in the google form. Sign-ups for the LSAT study groups will close by Thursday November 9th at 12PM. Study groups will be assigned next week. Please click the link here to sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/1qDrwNaXzpfopbVn1

In our next blog post we will share LSAT Prep Resources, so stay tuned.

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email

Mark Your Calendars – Week of November 6

February 2018 LSAT Study Groups

Taking the February 2018 LSAT? The test is only a few months away.

Pre-Law Advising Services is helping to organizing LSAT study groups for the February 2018 LSAT. We will organize groups based on the availability you specify in the google form. Sign-ups for the LSAT study groups will close by Thursday November 9th at 12PM. Study groups will be assigned next week.

Please click the link here to sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/1qDrwNaXzpfopbVn1

Pre-Law Events

Pre-Law 101: Tomorrow Tuesday November 7 at 4:00 pm in 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building. This workshop is designed for incoming students who are new to pre-law or are interested in learning more about it. We will cover: What it means to be pre-law at Illinois, course selection, majors, and extracurriculars, building a pre-law resume, and what law schools are really looking for. We will outline a four year plan to maximize your undergraduate experiences in order to make a great law school candidate. We’ll also take any questions about law school and legal careers. Incoming students should attend a Pre-Law 101 prior to setting up an individual pre-law advising appointment. NOTE: THIS IS THE FINAL PRE-LAW 101 OF THE SEMESTER. 

Interested in Patent Law and the Patent Bar? Do not miss this great event!

Patent Bar Exam Session Nov 15, 2017   5:00 – 6:00 pm  335 Grainger Engineering Library

The patent bar exam is the required first step to becoming either a patent agent for the United States Patent & Trademark Office or a patent prosecutor/litigator as a practicing attorney. Students with a background in engineering and the sciences (such as biology, biochemistry, physics, chemistry, computer science) are eligible to sit for this exam. (To see all exam requirements, visit the link below).  Join us for this Patent Bar session to learn about the exam from an expert. Mark Dighton, Director of the Practicing Law Institute Patent Office Exam Course, will be here to answer all of your questions about the patent bar, including:

  • What exactly does the patent bar cover?
  • When and how often can you take it?
  • How do people prepare for the exam?
  • What is the format of the exam, and how are results received?
  • What is a passing score for the exam?

He’ll also answer any other questions you have about the patent bar exam. This session is specifically designed for those undergrad and graduate students in engineering, science, or technology disciplines who are eligible to sit for the patent bar.

For a list of eligible majors or backgrounds visit  https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/OED_GRB.pdf This is a free event. Please register at the link here so that we can ensure enough seating and materials for everyone.

Other Campus Events

Writer’s Workshop–Interpreting & Using Critical Feedback Workshop on 11/7/17 4:00pm-5:00pm, Lincoln Hall, room 1024. Feeling overwhelmed by the critical feedback you’re receiving from your professors, advisers, and/or collaborators? This workshop will help you assess, integrate, and respond to critical feedback in the revision process. The workshop will be most helpful to graduate students or undergraduates working on senior theses or capstone projects.

Making Your Major Decision Presented by the Career Center

Thursday November 9 4:00pm to 5:00pm
Room 143
Struggling with figuring out which major to choose? Then this workshop is for you! Learn about how you can find a major that’s the right fit.

Scheduling Proofreading and Self-editing Strategies Sponsored by the Writers Workshop

Gregory Hall, Room 207
Tuesday November 7, 2017   3:00 – 4:00 pm
Want to learn about editing and proofreading skills? In this workshop, we will define these writing skills and help writers develop and practice effective strategies for both.

Interested in other Writers Workshop Events? Click here for more information. 

Events at the College of Law

“Trade in a Global Age: The Role of the United States” Presented by Grant Aldonas, Principal Managing Director

Wednesday, November 8 12-1 p.m.
Room A
Free and open to the public


The talk will explore how globalization has increased the economic costs of isolationism, and how the United States should engage in a rules-based trading system rather than retreat from it.

“Promises, Mandates, and Social Norms: Title IX at 45” Presented by Fatima Goss Graves, President and CEO of the National Women’s Law Center, will present the David C. Baum Lecture on Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

Thursday November 9, 2017  12-1 p.m.
Max L. Rowe Auditorium, Law Building
Free and open to the public

Sidley Scholars Program–Juniors and Seniors planning on attending law school in the Fall of 2019: consider applying for the Sidley Austin LLP Summer Pre-Law Scholars Program. This program helps to subsidize the cost of LSAT Prep and offers possible additional scholarships.

Scholars will receive up to $2,500 in benefits to fund the LSAT, CAS credentialing, pay tuition in a commercial LSAT preparation course, as well as reimbursement for application and CAS fees for up to seven law schools.

Scholars further may be eligible to receive an additional $2,500 scholarship award, in two installments. Scholars will receive $1,250 when they have (1) successfully completed an approved LSAT preparatory course, (2) taken the LSAT, and (3) applied to at least five accredited law schools. Finally, each Scholar will receive a final $1,250 scholarship distribution once the Scholar has informed Sidley that he or she has been accepted to, and is committed to start law school at, an accredited law school and has attended the entire Sidley Scholars Summer Seminar in the summer immediately preceding the Scholar’s matriculation at that law school.

Click here for more information. Application materials are due Friday January 12!

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email

Best of the Pre-Law Blog

Whether you’re looking for scholarships, internships, recommendations, LSAT tips or spring courses, we’ve posted about it on the blog! Here is a handy roundup of the Best of the Pre-Law Blog in case you’ve missed some of our most helpful posts.

Did you know…that you can search the blog using the search box in the upper right?

Planning your Spring 2018 schedule? Visit this blog post for course suggestions, then visit this blog post for other considerations in planning your schedule.

Looking for scholarships? Check out this post with details about our Scholarship Spreadsheet listing over 250 scholarship opportunities.

Trying to find an internship? Explore this post and GET GOING! A Spring/Summer 2018 Internship Plan–Starting NOW! You should also join our Facebook page, where we post internship and job opportunities for pre-law students.

Currently applying to law school? Whether you’re taking the December LSAT or you’re done with the LSAT and wondering what to do now  or you’re looking for letters of recommendation (see Tips on getting recommendations from someone who writes them), we have those and many other posts to help you through the application process.

Planning ahead for taking the LSAT in 2018? Great! Go immediately to this post on Big LSAT changes: What should you know?  Also take a look at Timelines for 2018 LSAT Takers.

Thinking about summer 2018 plans? Planning ahead is smart. Explore this Summer Pre-Law Programs post, and head over to our Compass page to see the Summer Pre-Law Programs tab, containing a spreadsheet with 46 pre-law summer programs. Also consult our internship resources mentioned above.

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email

February 2018 LSAT Study Groups

February 2018 LSAT Study Groups

Taking the February 2018 LSAT? The test is only a few months away.

Pre-Law Advising Services is helping to organizing LSAT study groups for the February 2018 LSAT. We will organize groups based on the availability you specify in the google form. Sign-ups for the LSAT study groups will close by Thursday November 9th at 12PM. Study groups will be assigned next week.

Please click the link here to sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/1qDrwNaXzpfopbVn1

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email

Mark Your Calendars: Week of October 30

Pre-Law Events

Pre-Law 101: TODAY at 4:00 pm in 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building. This workshop is designed for incoming students who are new to pre-law or are interested in learning more about it. We will cover: What it means to be pre-law at Illinois, course selection, majors, and extracurriculars, building a pre-law resume, and what law schools are really looking for. We will outline a four year plan to maximize your undergraduate experiences in order to make a great law school candidate. We’ll also take any questions about law school and legal careers. Incoming students should attend a Pre-Law 101 prior to setting up an individual pre-law advising appointment. NOTE: THE FINAL PRE-LAW 101 OF THE SEMESTER WILL BE HELD NEXT MONDAY, NOV. 7 REGISTER HERE FOR THAT SESSION.

Interested in Patent Law and the Patent Bar? Do not miss this great event!

Patent Bar Exam Session Nov 15, 2017   5:00 – 6:00 pm  335 Grainger Engineering Library

The patent bar exam is the required first step to becoming either a patent agent for the United States Patent & Trademark Office or a patent prosecutor/litigator as a practicing attorney. Students with a background in engineering and the sciences (such as biology, biochemistry, physics, chemistry, computer science) are eligible to sit for this exam. (To see all exam requirements, visit the link below).  Join us for this Patent Bar session to learn about the exam from an expert. Mark Dighton, Director of the Practicing Law Institute Patent Office Exam Course, will be here to answer all of your questions about the patent bar, including:

  • What exactly does the patent bar cover?
  • When and how often can you take it?
  • How do people prepare for the exam?
  • What is the format of the exam, and how are results received?
  • What is a passing score for the exam?

He’ll also answer any other questions you have about the patent bar exam. This session is specifically designed for those undergrad and graduate students in engineering, science, or technology disciplines who are eligible to sit for the patent bar.

For a list of eligible majors or backgrounds visit  https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/OED_GRB.pdf This is a free event. Please register at the link here so that we can ensure enough seating and materials for everyone.

 Register Now to attend the FREE Midwest Law School Virtual Fair on Nov. 7th
Meet Admissions Representatives & Faculty from Law Schools in the Midwestern U.S. Live Online!

Chat with admissions pros from over 30 midwestern law schools including Illinois, Northwestern, Notre Dame, Michigan State, DePaul, Valparaiso, and more! This is a free and easy way to learn about programs and to interact with law school representatives with no travel necessary. For more information and to register, click here.

Other Campus Events

Political Science hosts Careers in Political Science on Friday, Nov. 3 from 1:00-4:30 in the Illini Union Room 314B. They’ll have a panel followed by breakout sessions with political science alumni with work experience in law, business, government, insurance, data science, and journalism! For more details visit their website here.

Writer’s Workshop will host Writing Effective Thesis Statements & Essay Organization Workshop on 11/2/17 4:00pm-5:00pm, Gregory Hall, room 207
Are you writing an argumentative or analytical essay? This presentation will review the basic principles for creating effective thesis statements. It will also help students review common essay structures and strategies. You will have the opportunity to put this principles into practice, so bring a current assignment to work on. This workshop will be most useful to undergraduate students.

Writer’s Workshop–Interpreting & Using Critical Feedback Workshop on 11/7/17 4:00pm-5:00pm, Lincoln Hall, room 1024. Feeling overwhelmed by the critical feedback you’re receiving from your professors, advisers, and/or collaborators? This workshop will help you assess, integrate, and respond to critical feedback in the revision process. The workshop will be most helpful to graduate students or undergraduates working on senior theses or capstone projects.

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email

Course Selection for Pre-Law Students: Part 2

We previously shared a list of possible Spring 2018 courses of interest to pre-law students (click here to see that post). What else should you know about building your semester schedule? Here are several tips and suggestions to help pre-law students make the most of your upcoming semesters.

Students really can major in ANYTHING and be successful in law school, but you must be a strong student in whatever you choose. 

What academic skills should you build? Pre-law students must demonstrate strong research, writing, reading, and speaking skills, which can be accomplished both in and out of the classroom. These are the core skills that law schools truly care about, so take a look at your DARS and ask yourself: How many courses have you taken that develop and reflect these skills? Take courses that demonstrate those skills–they can be in any discipline. Popular options include English, History, Political Science, Philosophy, or Communication courses, but don’t feel limited to only those.

Balance academic challenge with success. Law schools want to see students who demonstrate academic success while taking a challenging courseload. Ideally, pre-law students would take an academic course load that is challenging both in terms of rigor and credits while still doing performing well. What does this mean, and how can you achieve it?

  • A challenging but not overwhelming course load suggestion is 15-17 credit hours. (This can vary due to individual factors, and is only a general guideline, not a mandate. Think carefully about the right course load for you.)
  • Be strategic in your course selection. Don’t take your 5 hardest classes in the same semester to get them out of the way. Work with your major advisor to determine how you can distribute those courses throughout your remaining semesters. Likewise, don’t take your 5 easiest classes at the same time–use those to give you some relief from the harder classes each semester.
  • For juniors and seniors–Move up from 1 and 200 level courses to 3 and 400 levels in order to demonstrate an appropriate level of challenge. A good general rule is no more than one 1 or 200 level course per semester for juniors and seniors (unless you must do so to graduate on time). Taking easy classes to pad a GPA is obvious to law school admissions, who know what a challenging semester looks like.

Use your major(s) and minor(s) to complement each other. If you have a major that does not necessarily demonstrate lots of writing or research skills, then selecting a minor or secondary major that does is a smart balance. Unusual combinations of majors/minors can also show a law school someone who is intellectually curious and able to succeed in a wide variety of coursework.

Consider changing majors, especially if you are not able to achieve mostly As and some Bs in your coursework.

Do not make course selections for these reasons:

  • A friend/roommate/sibling/parent said the class was easy;
  • I only wanted classes on Tues/Thurs so I just picked what I could get into on those days;
  • I only wanted afternoon classes so I didn’t even consider anything in the morning;
  • I wanted to hurry up and graduate so I took a very demanding overload each semester.

What, then, are good reasons to take a course?

  • It demonstrates the skills that law schools prefer to see;
  • I like the topic and find it interesting or it is required for my major/minor;
  • It fits in well with my remaining coursework in terms of balancing rigor and the ability to do well; and
  • I talked with my academic advisor who agreed it is a good fit for me.

You must prioritize academics if law school is your goal. Don’t get distracted from your goal of law school admission. If being president of a social organization or volunteering too much affects your grades, it’s time to dial back your extracurriculars and rededicate yourself to your role as a student. Law schools will not care that the reason your grades suffered is because you were planning a big fundraiser…that shows them a lack of prioritizing and time management skills.

Build important academic skills. Right now you are building academic skills and habits which you will rely on when you transition to law school, where the work is much harder and infinitely more time consuming than your undergraduate studies. Now is the time to master discipline (not procrastinating), effective note taking, reading comprehension and speed, attention to detail in your writing, citing your work appropriately, giving an effective speech, and managing your time. All of these are skills that you will be expected to bring with you into your law school classroom.

Remember that grade replacement will not help for law school (click here for a refresher), so take the time to carefully consider your best course options and seek help when you need it.

 

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email

December 2017 LSAT Study Groups

Taking the December 2017 LSAT? The test is only 5 weeks away!

Pre-Law Advising Services is helping to organizing LSAT study groups for the December 2017 LSAT. We will organize groups based on the availability you specify in the google form. Sign-ups for the LSAT study groups will close by Wednesday October 25th at 9AM. Study groups will be assigned next week.

Please click the link here to sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/QAJqodO8Js5i5BlB3

 

Twitter Linkedin Digg Delicious Reddit Stumbleupon Tumblr Posterous Email