Got pre-law questions? Start with the PLAS Pre-Law Handbook!

Although we love meeting students and alumni, we know that these meetings would be more useful and productive for all of you if potential applicants and aspiring lawyers would take the time to review the great information in our PLAS Pre-Law Handbook.  The user-friendly formatted Handbook covers a wide range of issues of interest to pre-law students.  You should take a look at all of them.  This post will highlight 5 really popular topics.

1. Exploring Your Interest in Law – This is for everyone new to pre-law, whether you are a freshman, sophomore, junior, senior or alum!  This section helps you evaluate your interest in the law and whether it might be a good fit.  Some of the areas covered/links provided include: What is a JD? What do lawyers do? What are some good online resources on the law? We have also included links to podcasts on these topics. Click here  and then select the “Exploring Your Interest in Law” tab for more info.  You should also check out our “Pre-Law Student/Applicant Checklist” tab for a list of “to-dos” that will help you get a general picture of what being pre-law entails. Note-the first suggestion in this section is that you attend a Pre-Law 101 session.

2. Preparing for Law School – So you’ve decided that you are interested in pursuing law school and a legal career.  This section helps you decide what you need to do now to prepare for law school. Some of the topics covered/links provided include: How do I select a major? What skills do the law schools value? What kind of extracurricular activities should you consider? How do law schools consider grade replacement, credit/no credit, or withdrawals?  Click here  and then select the “Preparing for Law School” tab for more info.

3. Financing Law School – Law school is expensive!  In fact, the cost of attendance/COA (tuition plus other expenses) at three well-known law schools recently topped $100,000 per year!  How do you plan to pay for it?  How do you put yourself in the best position to receive scholarships from law schools?  Click here  and then select the “Financing Law School” tab for more info.

4. Understanding Admissions Criteria – So what exactly are law school admissions people looking for in a candidate?  To be sure, a strong GPA coupled with a good LSAT score is important.  But what about: volunteer experiences; internships that expose applicants to the practice of law; letters of recommendation? These are just some of the topics covered in this section of the handbook.  Click here  and then select the “Understanding Admissions Criteria” tab for more info.

5. Applying to Law School – This section covers all topics related to the process of and requirements for applying to law school.  Some of the topics covered/links provided include: What is “rolling admissions”? What is the LSAT and how do I study for it?  What do the law schools require that applicants submit with their applications? How do I put together a law school resume? Click here  and then select the “Applying to Law School” tab for more info. Note: this particular section of the handbook has a LOT of “sub” tabs within the section addressing all aspects of the application process.  Aspiring law school applicants should review all of them!

The point is – the PLAS Pre-Law Handbook is an excellent resource.  It is intended to be a comprehensive overview of what it means to be “pre-law.”  It is also interactive, easy to use, and constantly updated.  As such, it is always a very good place to begin to find answers to your pre-law questions.

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Mark Your Calendars – Week of September 16

Pre-Law Advising Services Events

Pre-Law 101 workshops will introduce you to being pre-law at Illinois. Whether you are a new student or just new to pre-law, this is the best starting point for learning what to do to prepare for law school. We’ll answer all your questions about how to maximize your time at Illinois to become a great law school candidate. This workshop is offered several times throughout the semester.

      • Pre-Law 101 (for all students): Sept. 17 at 4:00. Register here.

Personal Statements & Resumes for Law School Applicants–This workshop is for those who are applying to law school in the next year or so (although all are welcome). We will discuss the personal statement and resume, including: what law schools are looking for, how to get started, what to include and exclude, and a sample plan for drafting them. This workshop is also offered several times throughout the semester.

      • Personal Statement & Resume Workshop–Sept. 23 at 4:00. Register here.

Meet us at the Majors & Minors Fair NEXT MONDAY, Sept. 23 from 1:30 to 4:30 pm in the Illini Union Rooms A, B, C.

WHERE is my workshop? If you look at our Events Calendar you will see that many of our event locations have not yet been identified. Due to construction, locations of these events will be announced about a week before the events.  Please continue to check our PLAS Events Calendar and our posts on Facebook throughout the semester to make sure you know where your workshop is being held!

Coming soon…

Law School Admissions Expert Panel – Wednesday, October 2, 7:00pm, 1002 Lincoln Hall

This panel features the law school admissions deans from the University of Illinois, Indiana University, St. Louis University and the University of Texas-Austin!  Click here for more info!

Law School Fair – Thursday, October 3, 10am-2pm at the Activities and Recreation Center

Close to 100 law schools will be here to answer your questions!  Click here for more info including a list of schools scheduled to attend!

Go here to check out other upcoming PLAS Events!

Campus Internships

ATLAS Internships for all LAS majors. ATLAS internships help students in the College of LAS gain hands-on learning with technology and provide real tech experience. No specific GPA or tech experience required. To apply or for more details visit their website here.

David F. Prindable Undergraduate Internship. This paid internship for undergrads in the Humanities (through the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities) provides the chance to assist with communications strategies, particularly through email and social media. Visit their website here for more details and to apply. Deadline: Sept. 27.

Office of Undergraduate Research

Getting Started in Undergraduate Research workshop–Learn about various forms of undergraduate research on campus and how to get involved. Visit the Office of Undergraduate Research website to register for both upcoming workshop options below.

      • Sept. 18, 3:00-4:30 pm
      • Sept. 19, 3:00-4:30 pm
      • Sept. 20, 3:00-4:30 pm

Career Center https://www.careercenter.illinois.edu/

Handshake–Looking for internships, jobs, career fairs, networking receptions, or other professional opportunities? Handshake is where it’s at! All students, not just seniors, should set up an account and start checking in on a consistent basis to see what opportunities interest you. Set up your account here.

ALL students should utilize the Career Center’s services! They offer a variety of programs to help you identify career paths through workshops, career fairs and individual meetings. Click on the link above to view all of their offerings.

Here are some of their upcoming events:

      • Gies Business Career Fair – Wednesday, September 18 & Thursday, September 19, Activities and Recreation Center (ARC), 2-7pm
      • Career Drop-Ins (no appointment needed!)–Sept. 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20, 11 am-4 pm
      • Are You Career Ready? –Sept. 17, 5-6 pm
      • Global Careers: Peace Corps Informational Session–Sept. 17, 6-7 pm
      • Global Careers: Japan — Sept. 19, 12-1pm, The Career Center Interview Suite, Room 213
      • Global Careers: Canada — Sept. 20, 4-5:30pm, The Career Center Conference Room, 143
      • Resume, Cover Letter, and Linked In Reviews are offered almost every day. Check the website for times and locations.

Law Schools

Harvard Law School

Interested in learning some tips about applying to Harvard Law School?  HLS has begun offering online information sessions.  Some concern the admissions process, others offer insight into campus life, student organizations, and clinical opportunities at HLS. To sign up for this week’s J.D. Application Requirements and Insights session, set for TOMORROW, September 17, at 5:00pm Central Time, go here: https://jdadmissions.law.harvard.edu/register/JDInfoSession2-2019.  To see the full 2019-2020 HLS Online Information Session Schedule, click on this link: https://hls.harvard.edu/dept/jdadmissions/connect-with-admissions-online-events/

University of Illinois College of Law – Constitution Day 2019

On September 17, 1787, thirty-nine of the fifty-five delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia signed the final draft of the U.S. Constitution. It then went to the states for ratification. Today, federal law designates September 17 as Constitution Day and Citizenship Day. Each year, the College of Law hosts a special event on behalf of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign to commemorate the occasion.

“The 2020 Presidential Election” – Tuesday, September 17, 2019
12-1 p.m., Room D, Law Building
504 E. Pennsylvania Avenue
Champaign, IL

Donald Trump made the Supreme Court a central issue of his 2016 presidential campaign and, as president, he has made two Supreme Court appointments. Candidates for president in 2020 are already announcing the kinds of justices they would appoint and weighing in on proposals to reform the Supreme Court such as by adding seats or imposing term limits. The Supreme Court views itself as above politics even as it decides cases that impact electoral outcomes–and might be called upon to resolve electoral disputes in 2020. Hear from a panel of experts on the significance of the Supreme Court in the 2020 presidential election and how the outcome of the election might impact the Court itself.

Panel Leaders: 

Vikram D. Amar, Dean & Iwan Foundation Professor of Law
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
College of Law

Jason Mazzone, Albert E. Jenner, Jr. Professor of Law
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
College of Law

Alicia B. Uribe-McGuire, Assistant Professor
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Department of Political Science

Event is free, and open to the public. Lunch will be provided to attendees.

 

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Planning on Taking the LSAT in October or November (or even January)? REGISTER NOW!

Fall 2019 Test Takers: As we discussed in our August 14 PLAS blog post, the new format and schedule for the LSAT have significantly reduced the number of available slots for test takers.  Consequently, the stated registration deadlines of September 10 for the October LSAT and October 10 for the November LSAT are almost meaningless. In fact, as of today THERE ARE WAIT LISTS FOR SEVERAL TEST LOCATIONS FOR BOTH THE OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER EXAMS! If you plan to take the LSAT either in October or November (or possibly even January – see below), you need to register ASAP – do NOT wait until the registration deadline!!  Here is a link to the test center search portal to allow you to determine where there are still open spots for the exam. https://tcs.lsac.org/SearchCenter.aspx. Remember: the next LSAT administration here at UIUC isn’t until February so you need to consider the best time and location for you with that in mind.

July 2019 Test Takers: Scores were released last week.  You have until next Wednesday, September 4, to cancel your score.  After that, it remains in your LSAC/CAS account and all law schools to which you apply will see it. If you opt to cancel your score, you should be able to schedule your free retake through your LSAC/CAS account. As noted above, you should plan to register for your retake ASAP! Registration is now open for all administrations of the exam through April of 2020.   https://www.lsac.org/lsat/lsat-dates-deadlines-score-release-dates. If you encounter any issues with scheduling the free retake, contact LSAC directly at (215) 968-1001.

Some final thoughts/reminders:

(1) Given what we are seeing with wait lists for fall registrations, those of you considering the January LSAT should also register as soon as possible to make sure you get a seat! Do not wait until the December 3 deadline!!

(2) Applicants who took the LSAT in either June or July (and all future test takers), do not forget to complete the writing portion of the LSAT.  Your law school applications cannot be processed until the writing section is submitted!

(3) For more information about the latest developments concerning the LSAT, go to the LSAC’s website.  You can also search our blog by using the search tool in the upper left corner of this page as we have covered these topics in several previous posts.

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Register now for Oct & Nov LSATs

Important Fall LSAT Update: We are hearing that there are wait lists for many October and November LSAT locations already. If you plan to take either of those tests, then it is strongly suggested that you register ASAP to get a seat! Upcoming LSAT options are: Mon, Oct. 28, Mon, Nov. 25, and Mon, Jan. 13 (2020). You can search for available test sites near you for each upcoming LSAT here.

The LSAC is advising that you add yourself to a waitlist for your preferred location for the October or November exam, and they will try to place you at that location or nearby. (Note that wait lists do not guarantee that you will get a seat.)

Registration is open for all LSATs through April of 2020 on the LSAC website here. For a thorough discussion of all the pros and cons of each upcoming LSAT revisit our blog here–despite the title, that blog post is not just for July LSAT takers!

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5 Things To Do After the July LSAT

The July LSAT is over!  Whether you’re applying to law school this fall or in future years, here are your next steps.

  1. Consider LSAT retake options. This is the only LSAT administration that will allow you to see your score, cancel it, and sign up for a free retake.  For a full consideration of ALL upcoming LSAT options–including timing for this fall’s applicants–revisit this post. Even though you don’t yet have results, now is a good time to consider your retake options so that you are ready to register as soon as scores are released.
  2. Get your letters of recommendation lined up. Have you already contacted your LOR writers and asked them to submit a letter for you? If not, do that now, because giving your writer all summer to write the letter is smart. Recent grads: Go ahead and approach your professors now, even if you don’t plan to apply for another year or two…having them submit their letter while they still remember you (and work here) is smart. Don’t wait until a super busy time for them–or come back to find that they’re retired, on medical leave, etc.–to ask. Here are some tips on getting great recommendations.
  3. Register for the Credential Assembly Service if you haven’t already. This is the account where your recommenders will send your letter–and they can’t write your letter until you set this up.  Click here for more information.
  4. Order your transcript(s) now if you aren’t taking summer classes. If you are taking summer classes, put a reminder on your calendar to order your transcript after August 12 (or Aug. 27 if you are a summer 2019 graduate). Note: You will need to order a transcript from every undergraduate institution where you took courses–even summer courses–so now is a good time to reach out to the registrar of any community colleges or schools from which you transferred. Here is where you order your UIUC transcript.
  5. Research law schools. The very first thing to consider is: What are your top 3 priorities in a legal education? (Location, employment, affordability, and admissibility are common priorities.) You’ll want to develop a list of 8-10 law schools that meet those priorities. You can find LSAT/GPA data, employment information, tuition, and more by using a resource like the American Bar Association’s Required Disclosure reports. On this website you will find these reports:
    1. 509 Required Disclosures = Previous year’s incoming class data such as GPA, LSAT, ethnicity, number of applicants + admits, etc., plus you can find tuition, number and amount of scholarships awarded, and transfer data.
    2. Employment Outcomes = Law schools are required to report the employment status of graduates 10 months after graduation. Here you will see how many of the law schools’s most recent grads are employed, and in what sectors.
    3. Bar Passage Outcomes = Law schools must report bar passage data about a year out. This report will show which state bar exam this school’s grads take, how many pass, and comparisons to the general state pass rate.

If you’re finished with the LSAT (not retaking it), then now is a good time to work on drafting a personal statement. We’ll post more about that in a future blog, or you can take a look at our Pre-Law Handbook (click on the Applying to Law School tab, then Personal Statements) for details.

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Free Digital Practice LSAT for Illini This Month!

Announcing…a great opportunity for pre-law Illini!

Taking the LSAT in the future? University of Illinois students and alumni have a unique opportunity to take a free digital tablet-based practice LSAT on campus on July 23!

Through a partnership between Pre-Law Advising Services and the Law School Admission Council, this digital practice LSAT will use the LSAC’s tablets on which the test is now given.

Details:

  • The LSAC’s tablet and stylus will be provided for test takers. No need to bring your own tablet.
  • The test will be administered in a realistic, proctored, timed campus environment.
  • Get a baseline score, or use it as practice for an upcoming LSAT.

Any interested Illinois student or alum may register.

  • Not currently LSAT prepping? Taking the practice LSAT cold will provide a baseline score.
  • Currently prepping for a fall (September, October, or November) LSAT? This realistic practice test on the LSAT tablet will be especially helpful.

Registration is required and seating is limited. Click this link for more details and to register. Location and other details will be provided to registrants prior to the exam.

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July LSAT Resource Extravaganza

The LSAC has released this handy one-page Friendly Reminders for July LSAT takers. Can’t view the picture above? Access the pdf here:

https://www.lsac.org/sites/default/files/media/LSAT-July_Test-Day_One-Pager.pdf

ICYMI: We’ve also posted these blogs below just for July LSAT takers.

5 Things To Know & Do for the July LSAT

July LSAT takers: A Guide to All of Your Free LSAT Retake Options

 

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5 Things To Do After the June LSAT

June LSAT scores are out!  Whether you’re applying to law school this fall or in future years, here are your next steps.

  1. Make some LSAT retake decisions. The July LSAT registration is closed, so September is your next LSAT retake option and registration is already open here. October and November are also options, but these are on Mondays and are not offered on our campus (if that is important to you). For a full consideration of upcoming LSAT options–including timing for this fall’s applicants–revisit this post. You’ll also want to start re-prepping with digital LSAT resources like these, since every LSAT Sept and later will be on a tablet.
  2. Get your letters of recommendation lined up. Have you already contacted your LOR writers and asked them to submit a letter for you? If not, do that now, because giving your writer all summer to write the letter is smart. Recent grads: Go ahead and approach your professors now, even if you don’t plan to apply for another year or two…having them submit their letter while they still remember you (and work here) is smart. Don’t wait until a super busy time for them–or come back to find that they’re retired, on medical leave, etc.–to ask. Here are some tips on getting great recommendations.
  3. Register for the Credential Assembly Service if you haven’t already. This is the account where your recommenders will send your letter–and they can’t write your letter until you set this up.  Click here for more information.
  4. Order your transcript(s) now if you aren’t taking summer classes. If you are taking summer classes, put a reminder on your calendar to order your transcript after August 12 (or Aug. 27 if you are a summer 2019 graduate). Note: You will need to order a transcript from every undergraduate institution where you took courses–even summer courses–so now is a good time to reach out to the registrar of any community colleges or schools from which you transferred. Here is where you order your UIUC transcript.
  5. Research law schools. The very first thing to consider is: What are your top 3 priorities in a legal education? (Location, employment, affordability, and admissibility are common priorities.) You’ll want to develop a list of 8-10 law schools that meet those priorities. You can find LSAT/GPA data, employment information, tuition, and more by using a resource like the American Bar Association’s Required Disclosure reports. On this website you will find these reports:
    1. 509 Required Disclosures = Previous year’s incoming class data such as GPA, LSAT, ethnicity, number of applicants + admits, etc., plus you can find tuition, number and amount of scholarships awarded, and transfer data.
    2. Employment Outcomes = Law schools are required to report the employment status of graduates 10 months after graduation. Here you will see how many of the law schools’s most recent grads are employed, and in what sectors.
    3. Bar Passage Outcomes = Law schools must report bar passage data about a year out. This report will show which state bar exam this school’s grads take, how many pass, and comparisons to the general state pass rate.

If you’re finished with the LSAT (not retaking it), then now is a good time to work on drafting a personal statement. We’ll post more about that in a future blog, or you can take a look at our Pre-Law Handbook (click on the Applying to Law School tab, then Personal Statements) for details.

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July LSAT takers: A Guide to All of Your Free LSAT Retake Options

July test takers: As you know, this is the big “transition to digital” exam, and ONLY for this exam, takers will be able to see your score, cancel if you choose, and retake for free until April 2020. It’s smart to think through your retake options now, especially if you intend to apply to law school this cycle (to enter law school in Fall 2020).

Tip: Before reading this, you may want to read our earlier blog post on 5 Things to Know & Do For the July LSAT

Let’s talk about 2 important details for considering any LSAT retake options.

  1. July LSAT scores will be released on August 28, and takers will have until September 4 to cancel that score. Given that information, let’s consider all of your LSAT retake options.
  2. The July LSAT is nondisclosed, meaning that takers will not receive a full report of questions you got correct and incorrect. Takers will only receive a score, nothing more, to study from for a retake.

Let’s consider all of the free LSAT retake options for July takers. 

September 21, 2019 LSAT. Registration is currently open here and closes on August 1.

    • July scores will be released long after the September 2019 LSAT registration deadline (August 1), so this will not be a realistic free retake option. Also, takers would have less than 1 month after July score release to prep for a retake, and that’s not a realistic time frame to see improvement.
    • This LSAT is offered on our campus. It is also the last LSAT of 2019 to be offered on a Saturday.
    • IF you really want this option because pushing to a later LSAT won’t work, then you may want to go ahead and pay to register for the September LSAT prior to August 1. You won’t get the advantage of the FREE retake, but you will still have the advantage of cancelling your July score if you aren’t satisfied with it.
    • Those who take this route would be wise to keep up with the LSAT studying until your July score is released (so that you don’t lose ground if you decide to retake), knowing that if you like your July score, you can just cancel your Sept registration and be done.
    • This LSAT is disclosed, meaning that test takers will get a full report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

October 28, 2019 LSAT. Registration for this LSAT is currently open here and closes on September 10.

    • This is the most realistic next LSAT for July retakers. (Demand will probably be high for that reason.) July takers will have 2 full months after July scores roll to prepare for October, which is a more realistic time frame to see improvement.
    • Note that this exam is on a Monday, which may mean making arrangements to miss class or work.
    • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
    • IF you plan to apply Early Decision, then this may be the latest LSAT accepted. It depends on the law school. Check the application of the law school where you plan to apply Early Decision to see whether they will accept November scores…many will not.
    • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

November 25, 2019. Registration is currently open here for this LSAT and closes on October 10.

    • IF you are planning to apply to law school this cycle (to enter in Fall 2020), then this is the latest LSAT we advise taking. (Why? The next LSAT isn’t until January 2020, which is getting late in the cycle due to rolling admissions.) This LSAT may also be too late to apply Early Decision–see the note above.
    • This exam is on a Monday, but it’s also during our Fall Break, so current students won’t have to miss class. It may be necessary to miss work.
    • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
    • For current students–This exam is very close to finals, and LSAT prep will need to be carefully balanced with academic performance throughout the fall semester.
    • This exam is disclosed, meaning that test takers will receive a full report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

January 13, 2020 LSAT. Registration is currently open here for this LSAT and closes on December 3.

    • This exam is possible for those who want to enter law school in fall of 2020, but it is getting late. Remember that in a rolling admission cycle, law schools begin accepting people–and awarding their scholarships–in September.
    • LSAT takers who are applying to law school this cycle would be wise to complete all other elements of the application as soon as this exam is over in order to apply ASAP once scores are released.
    • This exam is on a Monday, but it falls during our Winter Break, so current students will not have to miss class. It may be necessary to miss work.
    • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
    • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

February 22, 2020 LSAT. Registration for this LSAT is currently open here and closes on January 7.

    • This exam is very late in the cycle for those who are applying to law school to enter in Fall 2020. Applicants may even miss some law school application deadlines by the time February scores are released; check the deadlines of law schools you’re applying to if considering this option.
    • This may be a great option for those who aren’t applying to law school this cycle. Current students will have all of winter break to focus on LSAT prep. And, you’d be done with the LSAT before midterms–always a plus. You can spend the rest of the semester focused on your classwork.
    • This exam is on a Saturday, so current students don’t need to miss class. Alumni may not need to miss work, either.
    • This exam IS offered on our campus. Current students and local alumni can avoid travel costs and logistics.
    • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

March 30, 2020 LSAT. Registration for this LSAT is currently open here and closes on February 11.

  • This exam is not a realistic option for those who are applying to law school to enter in Fall 2020. Applicants will miss many law school  application deadlines, and many scholarships will already be awarded.
  • This may be a great option for those who aren’t applying to law school this cycle. Current students will have all of winter break AND spring break to study. And, you’d be done with the LSAT before finals. However, balancing of LSAT prep and classwork would be necessary throughout most of spring semester.
  • This exam is on a Monday (and does NOT fall during our spring break), so current students would need to miss class, and alumni may need to miss work.
  • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
  • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

April 25, 2020. This is the final FREE LSAT retake option for July 2019 LSAT takers. Registration is currently open here and closes on March 10.

  • This exam is not an option for those who are applying to law school to enter in Fall 2020. It is well past most law school application deadlines.
  • This may be a great option for those who aren’t applying to law school this cycle. Current students will have all of winter break AND spring break to study. However, this LSAT is so late in the spring that it requires balancing LSAT prep and classwork essentially the entire semester. And it’s close to finals, which is not ideal.
  • This exam is on a Saturday, so current students don’t need to miss class. Alumni may not need to miss work, either.
  • This LSAT IS offered on our campus. Current students and local alumni can avoid travel costs and logistics.
  • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.
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5 Things To Know & Do for the July LSAT

July LSAT takers, this post is for you. And there are a lot of you…the LSAC reports record demand for this administration.

5 Things to Know & Do for the July LSAT

  1. All July LSAT takers should take digital practice LSATs in case you are assigned that format. The LSAC has been adding to its digital LSAT prep, which now includes a familiarization tool and 3 full length digital LSATs–Prep Tests 71, 73, and 74–here. Tip: Avoid taking Prep Tests 71, 73, and 74 in their paper format before taking the digital version so that you get a realistic performance in a digital environment. The free Khan Academy LSAT Prep site also provides opportunities to practice LSAT questions in a digital environment.
  2. In addition to taking practice digital tests, review the digital LSAT FAQs here Know all of the details of the digital setup so that you can avoid spending precious time and brain energy figuring out this new format during the test.
  3. Remember to bring these items even though you may be taking the digital exam: Number 2 pencils (no mechanical pencils are allowed), eraser, and highlighter. Even those who are taking the digital format will receive scratch paper, so you will still need those items. You’ll also need your ID, admission ticket, snack, and other allowed items in a clear ziplock bag. Review this complete list of what is–and isn’t–allowed in the test room.
  4. Don’t forget to also take the separate LSAT Writing Sample after the test. You won’t be taking it during the test–instead, after the test you will log in to a secure website at home to write your sample and submit it. If you plan to apply to law school this year, then we suggest taking the writing part within 1 week of the LSAT so that you are completely done. Law school applications will NOT be complete without a writing sample submission. Tip: Put a reminder in your calendar to take the separate writing sample.
  5. Put these dates into your calendar: July LSAT scores will be released on August 28, and you’ll have until September 4 to cancel the score.  Note that Labor Day weekend is also during that time span, so if you will be on vacation, make sure you put multiple reminders in your calendar about the deadline to cancel. These dates also have important implications for LSAT retakes, which we will cover in the next blog posting…stay tuned!
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