Pre-Law Advising Services – Important Updates for Spring and Summer

Hello Pre-Law Students!

As most of you know, there are big changes coming for the PLAS Office.  Alex Gil, our Graduate Assistant, who is a 3L at the UIUC College of Law, will be graduating in May.  Jamie Thomas-Ward, our long-time Director of Pre-Law Advising Services, took a new position in the LAS Department of Economics in January.  Judy Argentieri, Pre-Law Advisor, is retiring on April 30.  There is a search underway for a new Director of Pre-Law Services, but that person will not be “here” on May 1, when we are all gone. So what are you going to do?

Appointments – Alex will be accepting appointments through this Thursday, April 23, then will be focusing on his law school final exams.  Judy will be taking student appointments through next Wednesday, April 29.  Please go to our online scheduling portal to make appointments.

New Team – As mentioned above, the search for a new Director of Pre-Law Services is ongoing.  The hope/plan is to have that person on board soon, possibly by June 1.  In any event, there will be a new director in place before classes resume in the fall.

In the meantime, when you have pre-law questions….

  1. SEARCH THE PLAS BLOG!! Do not forget to search this blog for any topic related to pre-law.  For example, as you all begin Fall 2020 course registration, you can use our March 30 blog post “Suggestions for Fall 2020 Courses” to assist you. Even some of our older posts, covering a wide variety of topics, can be helpful!
  2. USE THE PRE-LAW HANDBOOK!!  As we have mentioned many, many times, the PLAS Handbook, accessible on our webpage, has answers to a lot of your questions with embedded links to help with your research on a host of issues.  Spend some time reading through it.
  3. USE THE PLAS COMPASS PAGE!!  Our Compass page contains a lot of good information, such as: info on UIUC law school applicants; Pre-Law 101 and Personal Statement short videos; the Jobs/Internship Newsletter; and more!  Not sure how to access it?  Go to the Resources tab on our PLAS webpage, and then scroll all the way to the bottom for instructions on how to add the PLAS Compass page.
  4. KEEP CHECKING THE PLAS FACEBOOK PAGE!!  As updates are available concerning the new PLAS team, this will be the best place for up-to-the-minute information.  Haven’t joined our Facebook page yet?  Ask to join Pre-Law Advising Services at Illinois ASAP!
  5. KEEP CHECKING LSAC.ORG!! LSAT registrants and law school applicants – make sure you check www.lsac.org for announcements about LSAT cancellations, LSAT Flex (registration OPENS THIS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22 – TEST TO BE ADMINISTERED MONDAY, MAY 18 OR TUESDAY, MAY 19), law school application changes, etc.  And do not forget that you can access the LSAC’s FREE LSAT Test Prep Class, developed in partnership with Khan Academy, on LSAC’s website.
  6. DO YOUR OWN RESEARCH!! Now is not the time to be passive.  You must be proactive to stay on top of the constant changes happening here and elsewhere.  Put reminders in your mobile phones to check each of the above resources for important updates and changes!!  Here are a few other areas of interest that most pre-law students want/need to learn more about:
    1. Financing Law School: AccessLex (https://www.accesslex.org/) Law School Transparency (https://www.lawschooltransparency.com/ Our PLAS resources, including our Handbook, list these and other good sources for information on how to manage the cost of a law school education.
    2. Employment Information: ABA’s website http://www.abarequireddisclosures.org/MainHome.aspx. You can also check each individual law school website – this data MUST be published on their websites by ALL ABA-accredited law schools. Articles featured in the Law.com and NationalJurist.com publications, as well as data compiled by the National Association for Law Placement (NALP) are also helpful. https://www.nalp.org/
    3. LSAT and GPA Medians ABA 509 Report data – ABA’s website here http://www.abarequireddisclosures.org/MainHome.aspx. You can also check each individual law school website – this data MUST be published on their websites by ALL ABA-accredited law schools.

Refer back to this post or the PLAS Handbook as questions arise during this transition period.  And stay tuned for announcements and updates related to the new Director of Pre-Law Advising Services!

 

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Mark Your Calendars – Week of February 24

Don’t forget about TODAY’s presentation on law school scholarships by Rebecca Ray, Assistant Dean of Admissions at the University of Illinois College of Law, 5pm, Room 514 IUB.  Your should also scroll down for information on: internships, scholarships, a summer job opportunity and more!

PLAS PROGRAMS

Law School Scholarships and Negotiating Aid, featuring Rebecca Ray, Assistant Dean of Admissions at the University of Illinois College of Law – TODAY Monday, February 24, 5:00 pm, Room 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building

Law school financial aid works differently from undergraduate scholarships. Rebecca Ray, Assistant Dean of Admissions at University of Illinois College of Law, will be here to share insights into how scholarships are allocated and how to request additional scholarship opportunities. You’ll find out what to ask for, how to phrase these conversations, and what strategies are successful to achieving additional scholarships. Bring your questions and learn how to maximize financial aid for law school!
INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

Legal Internship Opportunity — Holder Law Group, LLP

Holder Law Group, LLP, a young law firm in Champaign-Urbana, is looking for interns who want to be involved in a fast paced, high-tech, multi-area, legal environment. Holder Law Group engages in personal injury, medical malpractice, and civil litigation. Attorneys at Holder Law Group have had experience in both public and private sectors of work, including small and large law firms and are happy to share their knowledge and experience. Interns jobs will vary, and be assigned based on capabilities, but may include medical record organization, filing, abstracting depositions, assisting in trial preparations, Court filings, and attending depositions and Court hearings and legal marketing. Work times are flexible and we are willing to work around your academic schedule. Positions are available for fall, spring, and summer semesters as well as during breaks. Please email resumes and cover letters to Ms. Betsy Holder: Betsy@holderlawllp.com  

Undergrad PAID Internship at UIUC in Environmental Humanities for 2020 — 2021 Applications due NEXT MONDAY, March 2, 2020!

Environmental Humanities is environmental studies from a humanistic standpoint. Envrionmental Humanities pulls from different movements (environmental philosophy, environmental history, ecocriticism, cultural geography, anthropology, and others) to study the relationship between humans and non-human nature, past and present. The IPRH-Mellon Environmental Humanities Research Group is composed of professors, post-doctoral scholars, graduate students, and undergraduates from different disciplines who are united by their desire to understand the human place in nature, as well as to examine critically the way people make meaning of it.

The research group seeks three undergraduate interns who will work with the group on their seminars, workshops, and programs for the academic year 2020-2021. Interns will also work with the research group director, Professor A. Naomi Paik, to develop their own research projects as well as a research symposium for undergraduates at the end of the spring semester.

Interns will work approximately 10-11 hours per week, paid at the rate of $15.75 per hours, and will have up to $600 to support their research. Applicants must be juniors or seniors the year of the internship. For more information and to apply,  go here.  Remember: The application deadline is 5:00pm on Monday, March 2! Please address questions to: Dr. Nancy Castro, at ncastro@illinois.edu.

CAREER CENTER

The Career Center offers regular opportunities for resume, cover letter and Linked In reviews. In addition, here is one workshop that might be of interest to those of you considering international law.

Global Careers: Internships at UN Agencies – Thursday, February 27, 6-7pm, The Career Center Interview Suite, Room 213, 616 East Green Street

For a complete list of upcoming Career Center events, go here.

OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH

The Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) is now accepting submissions for the 2020 Undergraduate Research Symposium (URS), set for Thursday, April 30Deadline for submitting an application to the URS is THIS Sunday, March 1, 2020, at 11:59 pm. The application can be found here. 

The URS is the signature event of Undergraduate Research Week (April 26-May 2, 2020), and brings together students, faculty, and staff from all disciplines on the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign campus, as well as corporate partners and sponsors, to learn more about undergraduate research and its potential to change the world. Students are encouraged to apply even if titles or abstracts have not yet been finalized – they can be edited.  Need help?  Attend the workshop on “Proposal Writing in Undergraduate Research” this Thursday, February 20, 3-4:30pm, Lincoln Hall Room 1002, described above.  Just make sure the application is successfully submitted by March 1!

LAW SCHOOL EVENTS AND OPPORTUNITIES

The Wisconsin Statewide Pre-Law Diversity Day is set for THIS Friday, February 28, from 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Marquette University Law School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This event is open to all students. For more information and to register, visit their website here.  Cosponsored by the University of Wisconsin Law School and Marquette University Law School, this FREE event includes lunch and:

  • an update on law school admissions in Wisconsin featuring the University of Wisconsin and Marquette University Law Schools;
  • breakout workshops featuring a mock class for students ; and
  • law school fair featuring admissions representatives from law schools around the country.  Click here for a list of law schools that participated in last year’s event.

Minnesota Pre-Law Scholars Summer Program – Applications Due March 6!

Minnesota Pre-Law Scholars (MPLS) is a program that offers a select number of students a free LSAT prep class each summer at the University of Minnesota Law School. Admission is highly selective and based on a holistic review of the MPLS application material.

College students considering law school, especially rising seniors and those from groups historically underrepresented in law school, are encouraged to apply. The program is open to undergraduate students and recent graduates from any undergraduate institution.

Students will learn about law school admissions preparation from Minnesota Law School staff. The remaining portion of class, taught by an instructor from The Princeton Review, will be dedicated to LSAT preparation and practice exams. Some daytime events such as law firm visits will also be offered. Three (3) excused absences will be allowed during the summer session.

There is no cost to participate in MPLS. However, participants must submit a $100 seat deposit which is fully refundable upon successful completion of the program. All books and study materials will be provided.  The program will run from June to mid-August 2020.

To learn more about MPLS or to apply, click on this link:

https://www.law.umn.edu/admissions/minnesota-pre-law-scholars-mpls-program


Harvard Law School Junior Deferral Program – Webinar THIS Thursday, February 27, 5-6pm CST (6-7pm EST)

As an undergraduate student thinking about what comes after graduation, you may find yourself ready to apply to law school and also excited to explore other professional, educational, or service opportunities. You may know you want to go to law school and also want to teach for a few years, garner business or legal skills in the workforce, pursue a master’s degree, or embark on a mission trip. Harvard Law School’s Junior Deferral Program offers you that flexibility and breadth of opportunity. Apply to HLS when you are a college junior scheduled to complete coursework and graduate in spring 2021, and, if admitted, commit to defer that offer of admission for a minimum of two years after completing your undergraduate degree. You may use the deferral period to explore your broad interests before returning to the classroom.  Join us, as well as students who participated in this program, for a webinar this THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, about this exciting application pathway.

Please register for this online information session at:

https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Gx3ct3UBRWyfDHvXicEweg

Note: This session will be hosted on Zoom. Full instructions on how to access the session will be sent to you after you have registered for the event.

For more information about the HLS Junior Deferral Program, go here.

SCHOLARSHIPS

Fred S. Bailey International Service Travel Scholarship for Cause-Driven Leaders — DUE TODAY!!

This program offers scholarships of $600-1800 dollars to University of Illinois undergraduate and Master’s level graduate students leading international service projects who plan to travel within the specified period.  Recipients will be selected on the basis of their demonstrated commitment to the project/program, long-term career goals in international development or related fields, the trip’s potential impact on the student’s learning and professional development, potential for positive impact on the host community and financial need. If selected, all recipients must participate in a 7-week online pre-departure course.  (For trips that occur between May 1, 2020 – January 17, 2021)

Application Deadline: TODAY, February 24, 2020

To learn more and apply, visit: universityymca.org/bailey/travel-scholarship/

Contact: Kasey Umland

Director, Bailey Scholarship Program, University YMCA

217.337.1514; bailey@universityymca.org

Fred S. Bailey Unpaid Internship Scholarship Program – Applications Due April 7

The University YMCA’s Fred S. Bailey Unpaid Internship Scholarship program provides scholarship funding to students who accept unpaid internships with public service agencies and not for profit organizations.  These internships provide an opportunity for students to complement their academic preparation with direct practical experience. The effort to combine a productive work experience with an intentional learning component is a proven method for promoting the academic, personal, and career development of students.

Students will be selected on the basis of their demonstrated commitment to community development, service, and activism and the internship’s potential impact on the student’s learning and professional development as well as financial need.

Award Amount: The University YMCA’s Fred S. Bailey Unpaid Internship Scholarship program provides $1000 scholarships for part-time unpaid internships and $2500 for full-time unpaid internships.  A full-time internship shall be defined as any internship that requires 30 or more work hours/week on average. A part-time internship shall be defined as an internship that requires less than 30 work hours/week on average but a minimum of 125 total work hours over the course of the internship.  The minimum length of both part-time and full-time internships to be funded is 8 weeks.  Awards are made directly to the student, not the organization sponsoring the internship.

Eligibility/Qualifications: The internship must meet certain criteria as listed below.

Internship activities that are eligible for funding: program development; fundraising; projects; generating marketing plans; designing posters; conducting studies and surveys; developing presentations; creating social media sites; preparing budgets and financial reports & more!

Internship activities that are ineligible for funding: primarily administrative responsibilities such as mailings, data entry, etc.; internships at for-profit businesses (except where exemptions are granted by the Bailey Scholarship committee); internships without clear learning opportunities; internships without supervision/mentorship; student teaching, internships, and other activities that are required for graduation.

For more information and to apply, go here.

La Casa Cultural Latina Scholarship – Application Now Open!  All applications due by 5pm on Friday, March 20!

 

AccessLex Institute – LexScholars Applications Due April 1!

AccessLex Institute is accepting applications for LexScholars by AccessLex, an innovative new diversity pipeline initiative focused on developing sustainable models for improving access to law school.

LexScholars is for prospective law students from underrepresented racial, ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds who possess the potential for law school success but may be unlikely to gain admission due to unfavorable LSAT scores and/or undergraduate grades.

Participants will benefit from access to various resources, including LSAT preparation, law school admissions counseling, financial education, writing skills development and wellness training. And there are no costs associated with the program for participants.

There are eligibility requirements, and students will need two recommender assessments to apply.

Applications will be accepted through Wednesday, April 1Click on this link for more information and to apply!

OFF CAMPUS EVENTS

The 17th Annual Illinois Latino Law Forum – NEXT Saturday, March 7, 2020, DePaul University College of Law

The Illinois Latino Law Student Association (ILLSA) is a coalition of Latinx law students dedicated to increasing diversity in law school. ILLSA takes great pleasure in announcing the 17th Annual Illinois Latino Law Forum that will take place on Saturday, March 7, 2020 at DePaul University College of Law in downtown Chicago.

We cordially invite high school and college students to participate in this pipeline program – offered at no cost – designed to encourage more Latino/as to consider the field of law as a profession by exposing them to the value of a legal education and a career in the field of law.

Guest speakers include: judges; practicing attorneys; law school administrators, including one of only a very small number of Latina law school Deans in the country; government lawyers, and many other inspiring professionals.

This event is free to attend but advanced registration is required!

In conjunction with the Law School Admission Council’s DiscoverLaw Program, we are pleased to offer the following highlights for the ILLSA Forum:

Illinois Latino Law Forum Highlights

·         Breakfast and lunch

·         Introduction to the study of law from the perspective of Latino/a judges and attorneys

·         Mock law school class taught by a DePaul Law professor

·         Tips and advice from law school admission professionals about the law school applicatoin and financial aid process

·         Opportunity to meet with members of the current Illinois Latino/a legal community, from judges and professors, to lawyers and current law students;

·         Law school information fair with various law schools present and the chance to obtain materials and ask further questions about the law school admissions process

·         Opportunity for college students to sign-up for a mentorship program and meet their law student mentor

·         Opportunity for college juniors, senior and recent graduates to apply for scholarships

Register today to meet some of the most influential Latinx attorneys in our country and be encouraged to become a part of the legal profession.

For directions to DePaul College of Law, visit our website.  There is ample parking at a number of public parking lots in the vicinity of the law school and multiple forms of public transportation.

For questions or require additional information, please contact depaul.illsa@gmail.com.

DGS Summer Peer Advisors – Information Session TOMORROW, Tuesday, February 25, 9-10 am Room 504 Illini Union Bookstore Building

The Division of General Studies (DGS) is seeking undergraduate student leaders interested in serving as DGS Summer Peer Advisors.  Candidates must be available for full day training May 18-21, 2020.  Peer advisors will be responsible for working approximately 20-25 hours per week from June 1-July 9, 2020.  The pay for this position is $10 per hour.

In addition to the information session listed above, there will be another information session on Wednesday, March 4, 3:30pm-4:30pm in IUB 504.

Required qualifications:

  • Strong communication skills
  • Demonstrated ability to work well with others
  • Knowledge of the Course Explorer website
  • Knowledge of UI Integrate Self Service
  • Successfully pass a background check
  • Minimum GPA of 2.0 or above

Preferred qualifications:

  • Former DGS student
  • Familiarity of ICT process
  • Knowledge of Illinois general education requirements
  • Junior or Senior class standing for Fall 2020
  • Demonstrated leadership experience
  • GPA of 2.5 or above
  • Attend a peer advisor informational session

Interested applicants should email a cover letter, resume and three reference to Jessica Arnold, jarnold7@illinois.edu by 5pm on March 23, 2020.  Applications received after 5pm will not be considered.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Summer Pre-Law Programs

Summer Pre-Law Programs

Summer pre-law programs are an excellent opportunity for undergrads to learn more about law school! Some are free and other programs have fees and a cost for students to attend. These programs are a different way to explore being pre-law during the summer months. These programs are a solid addition to a resume, but are in no way mandatory for a pre-law student.

Some universities offer pre-law programs on their campuses. This is a way for you to learn more about law school, visit a law school and campus, and learn more about law school in a structured setting. If you are considering attending law school at any of the schools below, these summer pre-law programs are an excellent way to get your foot in the door and experience what your life could be like there throughout law school. In addition, some schools (a few are listed in this blog post) partner with LSAC to offer Pre-Law Undergraduate Scholars (PLUS) programs.  Click here to learn more!

Here is information about five pre-law summer programs, three of which are FREE or low cost.  There are many other programs in many other locations in addition to these five, which are provided on our Compass page. (Not a member of our Compass page? Follow these easy steps to add yourself.)

IIT Chicago-Kent

Program: Pre-Law Undergraduate Scholars (PLUS) Program

Dates: Sunday, May 31, to Friday, June 19, 2020

Cost: FREE

Location: Chicago, IL

Application Deadline: February 28, 2020 — Click here to access

Program Information:  The PLUS program is a free, three-week summer program that will: provide participants with a deeper understanding of legal education via the program’s rigorous doctrinal and experiential skills-based curriculum; help participants develop essential core competencies needed to succeed in the law school application and admissions process, as well as insight into navigating the process; and expose students to a wide range of career paths within the legal profession.

Students must attend all classes and participate in all program activities in order to be accepted and to receive a stipend. This is a full-time commitment. Therefore, students must be available during the day and some evenings, and have no outside commitments that would prevent them from giving the program their full attention. Students must agree to provide PLUS administrators with education and career updates after completion of the program.

Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law

Program: Robert H. McKinney School of Law Summer Law and Leadership Academy

Dates:  June 1-6, 2020 (Sunday May 31 – Move In Day)

CostFREE

Location: Indiana University – Robert H. McKinney School of Law – Indianapolis

Application Deadline: April 3, 2020 — Click here to access

Program Information: The Robert H. McKinney School of Law Summer Law and Leadership Academy is a one-week experience designed to introduce undergraduate students from historically underrepresented backgrounds to law school and various careers that they may pursue with a law degree. If you are selected for the Law and Leadership Academy, you will learn about hot topics in the law and strengthen your academic skills.

University of Minnesota Law School

Program: Minnesota Pre Law Scholars Program (MPLS)

Dates:  Early June – Mid August 2020

Cost:  Participants must submit a $100 seat deposit which is fully refundable upon successful completion of the program. All books and study materials will be provided.

Location: University of Minnesota

Application Deadline: March 6th, 2020 — Click here to access

Program Information: College students considering law school, especially rising seniors and those from groups historically underrepresented in law school are encouraged to apply. The program is open to undergraduate students (and recent alums) from any undergraduate institution.

Cornell University Summer Pre-Law Program and Internship

Dates: June 8 – July 17, 2020

Cost: $6,830 (Participants will receive 4 course credits)

Location: New York City

Application Deadline: April 1, 2020

Program Information: During the first three weeks of the program, you’ll be enrolled in the four-credit course The American Legal System, taught by  attorney C. Evan Stewart using the Socratic method practiced at most U.S. law schools.

During the second three weeks of the program, if you’ve received an internship placement*, you’ll devote full days to your internship, which may be at a law firm or in the legal department of a corporation, government agency, or nonprofit organization. A final exam will take place during the week of June 29, 2020, exact date is TBD.

Click here for more information and to apply.

Duke University School of Law

D.C. Summer Institute on Law and Policy

Dates: July 6-16 or July 20-30, 2020

Cost: $600 for a single course; $400 for each additional course

Enrollment Deadline: Enrollment is now open!

Program Information: Classes will be limited in size in order to facilitate interaction between faculty members and students. Registration and tuition will include weekly special events for program participants and written and other course materials. Upon successful completion of the program, participants will be awarded a certificate endorsed by the Dean of Duke Law School, Kerry Abrams, and Faculty Director of the Institute, Neil Siegel.

The 2020 program will take place over the weeknights of two, two-week sessions: July 6-16, 2020, and July 20-July 30, 2020; classes meet on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday evenings, with Wednesday evenings reserved for special programs. D.C. Institute classes will be held at Duke in DC, located at 1201 Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Courses will introduce participants to legal reasoning, US constitutional law, with a focus on timely subjects such as the constitutionality of affirmative action programs, current topics in race, elections, and politics. Click here for more information and to enroll.

LSAC Pre-Law Undergraduate Scholars (PLUS) at Duke Law School

Dates: May 31-June 26, 2020

Cost: FREE

Application Deadline: March 16, 2020

Program Information: The PLUS Program enrolls 20 to 40 students per year with the ideal candidate being a strong student who is ready to work hard, engage in coursework, and is interested in the access this program provides toward preparing for a legal education.

The PLUS Program is open to students who have completed their freshman or sophomore years at four-year colleges and universities, technical colleges and community colleges. Eligible students will have completed between 24 and 60 credits by the start of the PLUS Program. The program focuses on attracting promising students from groups historically underrepresented in the legal profession, first generation college students and those from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, as well as students facing other significant barriers to entering the legal profession. For more information and to apply, click on this link.

 

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Build that Law School Resume – Look for Internships and RSO Opportunities NOW!

Law schools are especially interested in applicants who have some experience in legal related positions.  The sooner you get that experience, the better!  Your campus involvement and leadership are also important factors considered in the review of your applications.  Here are some ideas and opportunities to help you build a strong law school resume.

Local Opportunities. Internships can be really helpful to you and are valued by the law schools as part of your overall applicant profile.  As we posted earlier this week, there are events and opportunities on campus for law-related internships, even some paid ones! Go here and scroll down for more information about current openings on campus in the University Counsel’s Office and Environmental Humanities, as well as one in a local law firm.

Summer Internships. If you would rather look into summer internships, the time for action is now.  We published our PLAS Jobs and Internship Newsletter on Compass in December.  Go here to access it.  Note – many summer internships have deadlines in the next few weeks.

Resume Help. Interested in finding a job or internship but not sure how to craft a strong resume and make yourself competitive?  Then mark your calendars for next week’s PLAS workshop, Get That Law-Related Internship or Job — Wednesday, January 29, 5:00pm, 514 IUB.

Whether you are a sophomore applying for summer internships or a senior applying to post-graduation jobs, this workshop is for you! We will help you draft a resume and learn important skills for effectively finding and landing law-related internships and jobs!

We will cover:

  • Resume tips for applying to law-related jobs/internships, including what to avoid, what to include, how to structure it, and more. Bring your resume!
  • How to find law-related internships and jobs, including what to look for, where to look, and how to enhance your application
  • How to create effective cover letters that lawyers will read
  • What kinds of transferrable skills to highlight

Join us as we provide inside insight into how exactly to land a meaningful internship or job in the legal world.

Student Organizations. Maybe you already have an internship and are looking for a student group to join.  You are in luck!  The RSO Involvement Fair is TOMORROW, Thursday, January 23, 11am-3pm, Illini Union (I-Rooms, South Lounge, Courtyard Cafe).  This is a great opportunity to learn about the hundreds of registered student organizations on campus and possibly find one to join.  You should think in terms of getting involved with 2-3 meaningful extracurriculars while a student at UIUC. Clubs, volunteering, working on campus, mentoring, tutoring, etc., are all great options.

Remember – it is never too early to start building that law school resume so don’t miss out on these great opportunities!

 

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September and October LSAT Takers – The LSAT is over! Now what?

So the LSAT is behind you. Congratulations!  Now what?  Here is a checklist of items you should be working on to get those applications completed and submitted as soon as possible, with a target deadline of Fall Break.

  1. Complete the writing portion of the LSAT. You will not be able to submit your applications until you finish the writing section of the LSAT so hop on that ASAP!
  2. Register for the Credential Assembly Service if you haven’t already. This is the account where your letter of recommendation writers will send your letter–and they can’t write your letter until you set this up.  Click here for more information.
  3. Follow up with your recommenders. By now you should have already approached your letter of recommendation writers, but if not, now is the time. Provide a resume and allow at least 6-8 weeks for them to write and upload the letter to your CAS account.
  4. Order your transcript(s) now. Note: You will need to order a transcript from every undergraduate institution where you took courses–even summer courses–so now is a good time to reach out to the registrar of any community colleges or schools from which you transferred. Here is where you order your UIUC transcript. Want more information about the LSAC’s transcript policies? Go here.
  5. Write your personal statement. Not sure where to start? Sign up for our next Personal Statement and Resume Workshop, set for Tuesday, November 5, 4-5pm, Room 514 IUB. If you are unable to attend a workshop, we also provide a quick overview of the personal statement in our PLAS Handbook. Click on the “Applying to Law School” tab.  Once there, select the “Personal Statement” tab.  We have additional information in the “Applying to Law School” section of our PLAS Compass page. As both of these resources explain, each law school will have its own prompt(s) for the personal statement. While you may discover that many of these personal statement prompts are similar, you need to CAREFULLY REVIEW each prompt for each law school and reply to that prompt. Besides giving you a topic or direction to take, the prompt may also contain information about font size, page limits, etc. You need to open your CAS account and then begin to apply to each law school to see the details in each application. Note: just because you open an application today does NOT mean you have to finish it today. You can begin your law school applications and then go back and work on them at your own pace.  The law schools do NOT see anything until you actually submit your application.
  6. Research law schools. The very first thing to consider is: What are your top 3 priorities in a legal education? (Location, employment, affordability, and admissibility are common priorities.) You’ll want to develop a list of 8-10 law schools that meet those priorities. You can find LSAT/GPA data, employment information, tuition, and more by using a resource like the American Bar Association’s Required Disclosure reports. On this website you will find these reports:
    1. 509 Required Disclosures = Previous year’s incoming class data such as GPA, LSAT, ethnicity, number of applicants + admits, etc., plus you can find tuition, number and amount of scholarships awarded, and transfer data.
    2. Employment Outcomes = Law schools are required to report the employment status of graduates 10 months after graduation. Here you will see how many of the law schools’s most recent grads are employed, and in what sectors.
    3. Bar Passage Outcomes = Law schools must report bar passage data about a year out. This report will show which state bar exam this school’s grads take, how many pass, and comparisons to the general state pass rate.

If you have questions and would like to meet with an advisor, go here to schedule an appointment.

 

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How to Interview for Law School – Including Changes to NW Interview Process

Here’s everything you need to know about law school interviews–what they are, how to prepare for them, and what to expect. Note: Registration is already open for many law school interviews!

What is the purpose of the interview? In addition to admission, law schools might use the interview to screen candidates for scholarships, research opportunities, or special programs such as law school ambassadors. It is definitely worth an applicant’s time and effort to take the interview seriously.

The Illinois Career Center holds Mock Interviews for student. Mock interviews provide an opportunity to practice interviewing and receive feedback in preparation for actual interviews. Click here to schedule a mock interview

Know what kind of interviews your law schools offer

  • Research your law schools’ websites to see whether and what format of interview is offered. We posted a list of known interview types by school over on our Compass page.
  • First come, first served interviews–Some law schools offer interview slots to all applicants on a first-come, first-served basis.
  • Group interviews–Some schools like Georgetown will offer group interviews in selected cities. Visit their website here for details. 
  • By invitation only–some law schools like University of Chicago choose to interview applicants after applications are submitted and by invitation only.
  • Recorded interviews. Some law schools are now offering applicants the opportunity to record an interview. Usually this is how it works: You are given a prompt, and then 2-3 minutes to think about that prompt. Then the webcam records you for a few minutes while you give your answer to the prompt.
    • TIP: Make sure that you look professional and are in a quiet place without interruptions. Also, take a picture with your webcam before the interview so that you can see what’s behind you…you may be surprised to see that pile of laundry or unmade bed in the background.

Preparing for the interview

  • Do your research. You should expect them to ask you “Why this law school?” and they will want to hear specific answers. Take a careful look at the school’s website, employment data, and social media.
    • Do be prepared with specific talking points about the school that interest you: A particular journal, clinic, moot court, externship, or certificate program is a good example.
    • Avoid general platitudes like “you have a national reputation” or “you’re the best ranked school I can get into.” They want to see that your interest goes beyond their ranking.
  • Carefully review your resume and be prepared to discuss anything on it.
  • Many schools will also ask something like “What are your career goals?” or “Where do you see yourself in 5/10 years?,” or even “Why do you want to be a lawyer?” and you should be prepared to discuss your career interests.
  • Decide how you will address the inevitable “What are your strengths and weaknesses” question.
  • Behavioral interviewing. This mode of interviewing will ask you to “Tell me about a time when…” For example, you’ll be asked to tell about a time when you resolved a conflict, managed a team project, made a mistake, or made a big decision.
  • Practice. Sign up for a mock interview with Career Services, or have a lawyer/professor/trusted person sit down with you and ask you mock questions. Think carefully about what you want to say, and how you can best convey it. 

    At the interview

  • Make eye contact, introduce yourself, and shake hands. (You would be surprised how many people skip this. Seriously.)
  • DO NOT BE LATE under any circumstances. The biggest sign of disrespect to lawyers is wasting their time. Allow yourself plenty of time for parking/traffic/restroom. If you absolutely cannot avoid being late, call the office to let them know.
  • Dress up. This is not a business-casual situation; business formal is best.
  • Engage in small talk. How’s the weather, what a lovely office/view, how is your semester going, etc., is not only socially necessary but also gives the interviewer an idea of how good you are at making people feel comfortable talking with you–a critical skill to be a successful lawyer. This might even be part of the interview itself.
  • Bring questions for the interviewer.  Most interviewers will ask if you have any questions for them. Use the opportunity. Some examples might include:
    • What are the most important qualities in a Law School X student?
    • How would you describe the student body/atmosphere here?
    • What challenges do you see current law students facing?
    • What’s the best advice you have for an aspiring law student?
  • Thank the interviewer for their time. Reiterate your interest.

After the interview

  • Follow up with an email thanking the interviewer for their time.
  • Include something specific that you learned or enjoyed about the interview. Examples:
    • Thank you for your advice about _______________; I found that very insightful.
    • It was so interesting to hear your perspective on the unique qualities of this school.
    • I appreciate your candid advice for prospective law students.
  • Take the opportunity–again–to reiterate your interest in the school.

Changes to Northwestern University Early Decision Process

  • Applicants must submit their ED application before having an interview
  • Upon submission of your application the Office of Admissions will send you an invitation and detailed instructions to complete the interview
  • ALL ED interviews must be held ONLINE
  • Completion of an online video interview is a requirement for ED applicants
  • Applicants admitted through the ED program will receive a $120,000 merit scholarship, split evenly over the three years of their legal education.
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Spring 2020 Pre-Law Class/Course Guide

Spring 2020 Registration Time Tickets – Available Starting Monday, October 21! Registration is almost here, which means pre-law students are asking: What courses should I take?  As you know, students in ANY major can attend law school, and there are NO specifically required courses for pre-law undergrads. Law schools do not require any particular major or coursework. However, given an interest in law, here are some spring courses that pre-law students may find particularly helpful and interesting. These courses are only suggestions and are NOT requirements. For some additional information about course planning, go here to check out an earlier blog post with some good tips about planning your schedule.

CHART FORMAT: Want to see these suggestions in a handy chart format? Click here: Spring 2020 Class Chart

Some of these courses have prerequisites;  check Course Explorer and speak to your academic advisor about the best courses for you.

ACE 240: Personal Financial Planning. Understanding financial instruments, records, and tax implications is critical for nearly all lawyers.

ADV 310: Intro to Public Relations  Introduces the student to the practice and profession of public relations. Course material covers topics such as the history of public relations, the role of law and ethics in public relations, and theories that guide public relations research and practice. 

ANTH 160: Contemporary Social Issues considers how anthropological theory and methods enhance understanding of contemporary social and political issues, such as immigration, education, affirmative action, and welfare. Examines the relationship between social policy and social science.

BTW 263: Writing in the Disciplines teaches very practical writing skills for aspiring professionals. This spring’s topic is Cross-Cultural Communication.

BTW 271: Persuasive Writing examines persuasive writing in a variety of contexts including ads, argumentative essays, proposals, and campaigns.

CHLH Community Health 101: Introduction to Public Health and 210: Community Health Organizations are both good options for those interested in pursuing healthcare law. 

Communication courses are helpful, as all lawyers must demonstrate strong oral and written communication skills. Here are some examples of helpful courses:

  • CMN 101: Public Speaking (this is a prereq for most upper level CMN courses)
  • CMN 211: Business Communication
  • CMN 220: Communicating Public Policy
  • CMN 230: Intro to Interpersonal Communication
  • CMN 232: Intro to Intercultural Communication
  • CMN 260: Intro to Health Communication (for those interested in healthcare law)
  • CMN 321: Strategies of Persuasion
  • CMN 323: Argumentation

ECON 484: Law and Economics Applications of economic theory to problems and issues in both civil and criminal law and the effect of legal rules on the allocation of resources; includes property rights, liability and negligence assignment, the use of administrative and common law to mitigate market failure, and the logic of private versus public law enforcement. 

EDUC 202: Social Justice, School, and Society Examines the nature of justice and the dynamics of a pluralistic society to derive a conception of social justice.

ENGL 360: Environmental Writing for students interested in environmental law. Write about food, water, and energy resource systems. Students will also have the opportunity to meet working journalists and to practice professional skills like interviewing, conducting historical research, and drafting pitch letters.

ESE 210: Social & Environmental Issues for those interested in environmental law.

FIN 241: Fundamantals of Real Estate. A survey of real estate finance, appraisal, investment, law, brokerage, management, development and economics. Special attention is given to the analysis of aggregate real estate and mortgage markets, to the individual transactions within these markets, and to the legal and institutional factors which affect these markets.

FSHN 101: Intro to Food Science & Human Nutrition for those interested in food regulation or public policy related to food or nutrition. Discusses the evolution of the food system to meet the needs and desires of a complex, heterogeneous society. Provides an overview of food in relation to nutrition and health, composition and chemistry, microbiology, safety, processing, preservation, laws and regulations, quality, and the consumer.

GEOG 101: Global Development & Environment and GEOG 210: Social & Environmental Issues for those interested in international or environmental law and public policy.

GLBL 260: Global Human Rights Examines how ideas about human rights are defined and how they are differentially deployed. Looks at human rights claims and crises, and examines how governmental and non-governmental individuals and organizations have sought to deal with human rights violations in order to address problems of justice, retribution, and reconciliation at personal, national, and international levels.

HDFS 120: Intro to Family Studies and SOCW 200: Intro to Social Work. Both of these courses may be of interest to students who want to be advocates for families, juveniles, the elderly, or other vulnerable populations.

HDFS 420: Inequality, Public Policy, and U.S. Families for those interested in public policy and/or family law. Includes critical analysis of health care, employment, immigration, family leave, welfare and other social policy options that affect family life and well-being.

HIST 281: Constructing Race in America. Interdisciplinary examination of the historical, cultural, and social dimensions of race and ethnicity in the United States. Explores the complex and intricate pursuit of multiracial and multicultural democracy.

HIST 312: Immigrant America for those interested in immigration law. History of immigration and immigrant groups in the United States from 1830 to 1980. Covers major waves of immigration and focuses on the diverse cultural heritage, social structure, and political activism of immigrants from Europe, the Americas, and Asia.

HIST 442: Roman Law and Legal Tradition. Examines Roman law and legal tradition in the context of historical, political, and social developments; origins of law in primitive and ancient classical societies; surveys development of precedent, codification, and preservation of Roman law, and the impact of Roman law on western legal traditions.

INFO 303: Writing Across Media, a skill that all legal careers integrate and value.

JOUR 311: Media Law. Detailed analysis of the theories of freedom of expression, the legal doctrines of greatest concern to mass communicators, and contemporary issues related to free speech and press, including libel, copyright, and news-gathering in a digital age.

LAW 303: Living the Law This course first applies the legal understanding developed in LAW 301 to situations in the real world, and then explores how the law is viewed through different social science lenses. Students interested in deepening their knowledge of how the law operates in today’s world, and how the law is studied in the social sciences, will benefit from this class. Prerequisite: Law 301.

LAW 305: Art and Cultural Property Law. This course concerns the emergence of “art” and “cultural property” law as a distinct field of legal inquiry and practice. Among the dozens of important relevant issues in this field are the successes and failures of law in policing cultural heritage crimes, the rise of artistic nationalism, cultural heritage as a casualty of war, censorship, and provenance studies.

LER 100: Intro to Labor Studies for those interested in corporate or employment law. Looks at economic, political, and workplace issues facing working people, why and how workers join unions, how unions are structured and function, and how unions and management bargain a contract. Provides a historical overview of the American labor movement, and discusses the contemporary struggles workers and unions face in a rapidly changing global economy.

LER 120: Contemporary Labor Problems for those interested in corporate or employment law.  Focuses on problems and challenges facing American workers and the U.S. labor movement. Topics include the deterioration of the labor-management “social contract” in recent decades; a review of labor and employment law; the health care crisis; globalization and cross-border union alliances; and union democracy.

NRES courses that can be helpful for students interested in pursuing environmental law include:
NRES 102: Intro to Natural Resources and Environmental Science
NRES 105: Climate Change Impacts on Ecological Systems
NRES 287: Environment and Society

PHIL 102/103: Logic & Reasoning. Especially helpful for students who have yet to take the LSAT, as two sections of the LSAT are based on logical and analytical reasoning.

PHIL 104/105: Intro to Ethics.  Basic exploration of ethics, including the relationship between social morality and the law.

PHIL 107: Intro to Political Philosophy. Introduction to core ideas in political and legal philosophy, for example, rights, equality, political obligations, legitimacy of states, nationalism, and oppression.

Political Science options to gain a foundational understanding of our legal system and its role within broader political structures include the following. Review course restrictions for prerequisites.

  • PS 220/322: Intro to Public Policy/Law & Public Policy
  • PS 271: Environment and Society
  • PS 280: Intro to International Relations
  • PS 301/302: US Constitution I & II are both helpful primers for law school
  • PS 313: Congress and Foreign Policy
  • PS 329: Immigration & Citizenship
  • PS 370: Justice in the Law
  • PS 396: International Conflict

PS 491: Internship with the Champaign County Public Defender’s Office. Are you interested in how criminal courts work?  Would you like to see an arraignment, a motion hearing, or a real criminal trial?  Want to meet with Public Defender clients and help an attorney prepare cases for court?  The Department of Political Science and the Champaign County Public Defender’s Office will offer an internship for academic credit in Spring, 2020.    In this internship, students will earn 3 hours of credit for their work in the Public Defender’s Office combined with a series of structured academic assignments requiring integration of internship experiences with readings on the political systems, the legal system and constitutional and human rights. This class requires one hour of class time per week, and about six hours per week of work at the internship site. Admission is competitive: We expect to have five openings for Spring of 2020.

To apply: By Friday, October 25, students seeking to participate in the Public Defender Internship Program must submit an application online at https://forms.illinois.edu/sec/2536463. The application consists of a cover letter, informal transcript, resume and writing sample. All of those materials will be reviewed for a decision on acceptance into the program by the departmental internship committee. At a minimum, students seeking to participate in this program need (1) to have completed 45 credit hours by Spring, 2020 (2) with at least one year of residence on this campus and (3) to have earned a cumulative UIUC grade point average of 3.0 or higher.  They must (4) have completed PS 101: U.S. Government & Politics and (5) have no arrests or criminal convictions – as an adult or juvenile – or serious campus disciplinary violations involving campus or local law enforcement. 

PSYCH 144: Stereotypes, Prejudice & Discrimination

Sociology has a Criminology, Law and Society minor. These courses may be helpful for students exploring criminal legal issues and the criminal justice system on a societal level, such as:

  • SOC 275: Criminology
  • SOC 375: Criminal Justice System
  • SOC 378: Sociology of Law
  • SOC 479: Law and Society

UP 160: Race, Social Justice, and Cities. Explore everyday racial conflicts in selected cities as expressions of historical struggles for social and spatial justice, across multiple scales. Focus on the governance of routine social practices ranging from policing, to education, to gentrification and memorialization in public places.

More courses to explore different areas of law include the following. Some have restrictions; check Course Explorer.

  • ACE 403: Agricultural Law
  • GEOG 210: Social & Environmental Issues
  • RST 354: Legal Aspects of Sport
  • SE 400 Engineering Law (only pre-req is RHET 105)

Business classes can provide a helpful foundation for those interested in corporate careers, however, most are restricted to College of Business majors or minors. Some courses will release any leftover seats after a restricted period; check Course Explorer for more details.

  • BADM 300 Legal Environment of Business
  • BADM 314 Leading Negotiations
  • BADM 340: Ethical Dilemmas of Business
  • BADM 380: International Business
  • BADM 403: Corporate & Commercial Law

Remember that these are only suggestions and that people come to law school from a variety of academic disciplines.  This is not intended to be an exhaustive list. Courses get added all the time, and many are added after we publish this list. Many other great courses can be found in Course Explorer, some of which have prerequisites. Do additional research and talk with your academic advisor to identify other good options for you.

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Mark Your Calendars – Week of October 7, 2019

Pre-Law Advising Services Events

Pre-Law 101 – NEXT Monday, October 14, 4-5pm, Room 514 IUB

This workshop is designed for incoming students who are new to pre-law or are interested in learning more about it. All Illini are welcome.

We will cover: What it means to be pre-law at Illinois, course selection, majors, and extracurriculars, building a pre-law resume, and what law schools are really looking for. We will outline a four year plan to maximize your undergraduate experiences in order to make a great law school candidate. We’ll also take any questions about law school and legal careers.

Each Pre-Law 101 session is the same, so pick the one that best suits your schedule. Incoming freshmen should attend a Pre-Law 101 prior to setting up an individual pre-law advising appointment. Please register here so that we can ensure we have enough seating and materials.

Go here to check out other upcoming PLAS Events!

Law School/Legal Education Events

Harvard Law School Online Info Session

Interested in learning some tips about applying to Harvard Law School?  HLS has begun offering online information sessions.  Some concern the admissions process, others offer insight into campus life, student organizations, and clinical opportunities at HLS. Click here to register for these upcoming sessions, and to see the entire schedule. 

    • HLS Faculty Session — Oct. 8, 12:00-1:00 pm (EST)
    • LGBTQ+ at HLS — Oct. 10, 6:00-7:00 pm (EST)

NYU  Law School Online Info Session

The Office of JD Admissions is inviting all prospective applicants to attend their Online Information Sessions to learn more about the law school application process and about NYU Law’s offerings. The presentations will be a special broadcast of a live information session with an admissions representative. Participants will have an opportunity to submit questions about NYU’s curriculum, student life, and the admissions process via our online chat tool. Click here to register for an upcoming session and to see the entire schedule.

    • Wednesday, October 16 at 3:00pm EST

AccessLex, a nonprofit working to educate law students about the financial aspects of legal education, invites all who are interested to these free upcoming events. Click here to register and to view their full schedule.

    • Financing Your Legal Education–Oct. 7, 9:00 pm (EST)
    • Optimizing Your Law School Decisions — Oct. 8, 7:00 pm (EST)

Law School Open Houses/Information Days/Programs

Some schools schedule formal open houses and others require you to choose a date for a visit. Open houses are a great opportunity to visit the campus, sit in on a class, see what the students and professors are like, and a great opportunity to answer all of your questions.  Most law schools require you to register for these events.  We have listed below some upcoming open houses for law schools in Illinois.  If you want to research other law schools’ open house info, you can begin by checking out our list of the law schools that attended the Law School Fair last week.  Scroll down the page. When you click on the law school, the embedded link will take you to that school’s admissions page.

Chicago-Kent Law School Open House/Admissions Workshop – THIS Saturday, October 12, 10am-12:00pm

This will be an in-depth workshop on the admissions process and strategies for constructing a strong application. Click here to register!

University of Chicago Law School Open House – Friday, November 1, 9am-1pm

The programs for the Open House will give you a glimpse into life at the Law School: you will attend a class, meet with students, faculty, and staff, and take a tour of the school. Members of the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid will be available to answer any questions you have about applying for admission to the Law School or about the Law School in general. Click here for more information and to register!

Northwestern University School of Law – Super Saturday – November 9

After requesting an On-Campus Interview within your JD application (so you need to submit your application first), the Admissions Office will send you an invitation and you will be equipped to select from available slots for your interview.  Go here for more info. Note:  Early decision / ED applicants are required to complete an online video interview. Upon submitting your ED application to Northwestern Law, you will receive an invitation to our online video interview portal and guidance for completing this requirement. For additional information on the interview process, visiting the school and other questions you may have, check out the FAQs on Northwestern Law’s website here.

University of Illinois College of Law – Fourth District Appellate Court to Hear Oral Arguments at College of Law – Tuesday, October 8, 10:30am-12:30pm, Room D Law Building

Justice Lisa Holder White, Justice Thomas M. Harris, and Justice Craig DeArmond will hear oral arguments at the College of Law. The judges will hear arguments on a criminal case and a civil case:

10:30 a.m. — Guns Save Life, Inc. v. Kwame Raoul
11:30 a.m. — People of The State of Illinois v. Treshaun M. Jake

This event is FREE and open to the public.  For more information, go here.

Marquette University Law School – Open House Saturday, November 16, 9:00am-11:30am, Eckstein Hall, 1215 W. Michigan Street, Milwaukee, WI

Tours begin at 9am followed by an Information Session and Student Panel beginning at 10am.  RSVP online here or by calling 414.288.6767.

University of Toledo College of Law – Launch into Law Program – Applications due October 31, 2019!

Launch into Law is an immersive, 5-day experience at Toledo Law designed to prepare students from traditionally underserved groups for the law school application process. Learn test-taking strategies for the LSAT, enhance your legal writing skills, and connect with student and professional mentors to explore law school options and legal career paths. The program will be held at Toledo Law January 13-17, 2020.

Students who complete the program and later apply to Toledo Law are eligible for a $1,000 scholarship upon acceptance to The University of Toledo College of Law. Go here for more information and to apply.

This program is open to highly-qualified undergraduates at no cost. Space is limited. Students from traditionally underserved populations are strongly encouraged to apply. Selected students will be notified on or before Nov. 8.

Internships and Jobs

ATLAS Internships for all LAS majors. ATLAS internships help students in the College of LAS gain hands-on learning with technology and provide real tech experience. No specific GPA or tech experience required. To apply or for more details visit their website here.

2020 Census Takers Needed

Looking for a way to make some extra money this year?  The U.S. Census Bureau is looking to hire individuals all across the United States to help collect data for the 2020 Census.  Hourly rates vary by location, with pay starting at $15 per hour in Champaign County and ranging from $18-$22 per hour in Cook County.  Go here for more information and to apply!

Office of Undergraduate Research

Proposal Writing in Undergraduate Research–Oct. 10, 3:00-4:30 pm. This workshop will discuss the fundamentals of proposal writing, guiding students to formulate successful research projects and explain their research in a concise and compelling manner that is understandable to a general audience. Students will leave the workshop with (1) basic knowledge about research proposals and their structure, (2) tactics and tools to write successful research statements, and (3) a list of resources for assistance in the writing process.Visit the Office of Undergraduate Research website to register.

Career Center https://www.careercenter.illinois.edu/

Handshake–Looking for internships, jobs, career fairs, networking receptions, or other professional opportunities? Handshake is where it’s at! All students, not just seniors, should set up an account and start checking in on a consistent basis to see what opportunities interest you. Set up your account here.

ALL students should utilize the Career Center’s services! They offer a variety of programs to help you identify career paths through workshops, career fairs and individual meetings. Click on the link above to view all of their offerings.

Here are some of their upcoming events:

      • Finding Your Internship Workshop — Wednesday, Oct. 9, 5-6:00pm, Career Center Conference Room 143
      • Resume, Cover Letter, and Linked In Reviews are offered almost every day. Check the website for times and locations.

 

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New Downloadable Pre-Law Calendar!!

Download the New Pre-Law Calendar!

Staying organized with school work and applying to law school can be a difficult challenge for many students. That is why we have created a Pre-Law Calendar for students to download that will remind you when to work on applying to law school! We have taken the stress off your shoulder and have offered answers to questions such as “when should I start my personal statement?” “when is the next LSAT exam?” and “when should I get my letter of recommendations?” All these answers and more will be available to you on the Pre-law Calendar.

The Pre-Law Calendar is available for ICal, Outlook, and Google Calendar. For students interested in using the google calendar format must follow the additional downloading steps below.

How to Convert ICal to Google Calendar

      1. On the left side go to “Other Calendars” and click on the drop down.
      2. Choose “Import calendar“.
      3. Click on “Choose file” and locate the .ics file on your computer.  A copy of the .ics file is below.  (https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/uiucprelaw%40gmail.com/public/basic.ics)     
      4. Click on “Import” and wait for Google to import your events.

Check out some snap shoots of  how the calendar works!

 

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Got pre-law questions? Start with the PLAS Pre-Law Handbook!

Although we love meeting students and alumni, we know that these meetings would be more useful and productive for all of you if potential applicants and aspiring lawyers would take the time to review the great information in our PLAS Pre-Law Handbook.  The user-friendly formatted Handbook covers a wide range of issues of interest to pre-law students.  You should take a look at all of them.  This post will highlight 5 really popular topics.

1. Exploring Your Interest in Law – This is for everyone new to pre-law, whether you are a freshman, sophomore, junior, senior or alum!  This section helps you evaluate your interest in the law and whether it might be a good fit.  Some of the areas covered/links provided include: What is a JD? What do lawyers do? What are some good online resources on the law? We have also included links to podcasts on these topics. Click here  and then select the “Exploring Your Interest in Law” tab for more info.  You should also check out our “Pre-Law Student/Applicant Checklist” tab for a list of “to-dos” that will help you get a general picture of what being pre-law entails. Note-the first suggestion in this section is that you attend a Pre-Law 101 session.

2. Preparing for Law School – So you’ve decided that you are interested in pursuing law school and a legal career.  This section helps you decide what you need to do now to prepare for law school. Some of the topics covered/links provided include: How do I select a major? What skills do the law schools value? What kind of extracurricular activities should you consider? How do law schools consider grade replacement, credit/no credit, or withdrawals?  Click here  and then select the “Preparing for Law School” tab for more info.

3. Financing Law School – Law school is expensive!  In fact, the cost of attendance/COA (tuition plus other expenses) at three well-known law schools recently topped $100,000 per year!  How do you plan to pay for it?  How do you put yourself in the best position to receive scholarships from law schools?  Click here  and then select the “Financing Law School” tab for more info.

4. Understanding Admissions Criteria – So what exactly are law school admissions people looking for in a candidate?  To be sure, a strong GPA coupled with a good LSAT score is important.  But what about: volunteer experiences; internships that expose applicants to the practice of law; letters of recommendation? These are just some of the topics covered in this section of the handbook.  Click here  and then select the “Understanding Admissions Criteria” tab for more info.

5. Applying to Law School – This section covers all topics related to the process of and requirements for applying to law school.  Some of the topics covered/links provided include: What is “rolling admissions”? What is the LSAT and how do I study for it?  What do the law schools require that applicants submit with their applications? How do I put together a law school resume? Click here  and then select the “Applying to Law School” tab for more info. Note: this particular section of the handbook has a LOT of “sub” tabs within the section addressing all aspects of the application process.  Aspiring law school applicants should review all of them!

The point is – the PLAS Pre-Law Handbook is an excellent resource.  It is intended to be a comprehensive overview of what it means to be “pre-law.”  It is also interactive, easy to use, and constantly updated.  As such, it is always a very good place to begin to find answers to your pre-law questions.

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