Quad Day and Building Your Pre-Law Resume

Quad Day is coming! Sunday, August 25 from noon to 4 pm, the Quad will be hopping with hundreds of Registered Student Organizations (RSOs).

Pre-law students often ask: What is the best RSO for law school? Here are some considerations for how to use your free time in a productive, fun, and useful way with an eye toward law school in the future.

What are law schools looking for?

Law schools like applicants who are well-rounded (not one dimensional), productive (manage their time well), and interested in contributing to their communities or committed to certain issues (like the environment) or populations (like children or the elderly).

You can use your RSO experiences to highlight: transferable skills (like working with money or managing teams), time management skills, commitment to causes or populations in need, working with different kinds of people, and leadership experience.

  • How many? Think quality over quantity here. That’s why we recommend 2-3 meaningful activities. It’s just not possible to be president of 15 organizations and work and volunteer and carry a full course load and retain your health and sanity. Law schools do not expect that, and trying to achieve that much can lead to crashing and burning.
  • What is meaningful? By meaningful, we mean:
    • You actually find it interesting and productive (or fun) OR you’re working for the income or the skills
    • Ongoing engagement (over multiple semesters, not just one and done or one evening each semester)
    • It provides some benefit to you–learning a new skill, networking, improving academics, or even a health or social benefit

What kind of RSOs are “best” for pre-law students?

There is no one magical RSO that will guarantee your admission to law school. Think about how many different kinds of law there are–from environmental to corporate to healthcare. Those lawyers have different skills, interests, and backgrounds, and that’s okay. With that in mind, here are some considerations…and keep in mind that these are only suggestions.

A reasonable approach to student activities is: One professional, academic, or volunteering organization and one “fun” organization. (Add more if and when you have time and interest).

Professional/Academic organizations include: Professional, networking, or skills-based clubs and fraternities, clubs within your major, honor societies (if you’re actually involved and not just inducted and done).

Pre-law organizations can be a great way to meet other pre-law students (with whom you can prep for the LSAT and commiserate), network with the legal community, and explore the profession. There are many, from the Pre-Law Club, Pre-Law Honors Society, Minority Association of Future Attorneys, Illinois Trial Team, and many others. (Visit this website to explore all RSOs at Illinois.)

Social organizations can add fun and help you build community and look like a well-rounded student. Illinois has countless options including Greek life and clubs for all sorts of fun hobbies from music to skiing.

Volunteering is also a great way to network, build community, and explore a particular topic or population. It shows a law school that you are a concerned citizen willing to contribute your time to important causes. As lawyers we are expected to contribute pro bono (free) legal services to people or causes in need, so law schools like to see that you are already someone who understands the importance of helping.

Volunteering is especially helpful to prepare for a career in a particular legal area. For example, if you think you’re interested in environmental law, join an environmental organization. If you think you’re interested in family law, volunteer with children.

Do I have to be a member of any certain RSO in order to be a successful law school applicant? 

NO. Law schools are not looking for cookie cutter applicants who all have the same resume and experiences. Take advantage of this by pursuing RSOs that actually interest you! Whether you are interested in the environment, animals, immigration, or entrepreneurship, pursue your interests.

 

 

 

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Register now for Oct & Nov LSATs

Important Fall LSAT Update: We are hearing that there are wait lists for many October and November LSAT locations already. If you plan to take either of those tests, then it is strongly suggested that you register ASAP to get a seat! Upcoming LSAT options are: Mon, Oct. 28, Mon, Nov. 25, and Mon, Jan. 13 (2020). You can search for available test sites near you for each upcoming LSAT here.

The LSAC is advising that you add yourself to a waitlist for your preferred location for the October or November exam, and they will try to place you at that location or nearby. (Note that wait lists do not guarantee that you will get a seat.)

Registration is open for all LSATs through April of 2020 on the LSAC website here. For a thorough discussion of all the pros and cons of each upcoming LSAT revisit our blog here–despite the title, that blog post is not just for July LSAT takers!

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5 Things To Do After the July LSAT

The July LSAT is over!  Whether you’re applying to law school this fall or in future years, here are your next steps.

  1. Consider LSAT retake options. This is the only LSAT administration that will allow you to see your score, cancel it, and sign up for a free retake.  For a full consideration of ALL upcoming LSAT options–including timing for this fall’s applicants–revisit this post. Even though you don’t yet have results, now is a good time to consider your retake options so that you are ready to register as soon as scores are released.
  2. Get your letters of recommendation lined up. Have you already contacted your LOR writers and asked them to submit a letter for you? If not, do that now, because giving your writer all summer to write the letter is smart. Recent grads: Go ahead and approach your professors now, even if you don’t plan to apply for another year or two…having them submit their letter while they still remember you (and work here) is smart. Don’t wait until a super busy time for them–or come back to find that they’re retired, on medical leave, etc.–to ask. Here are some tips on getting great recommendations.
  3. Register for the Credential Assembly Service if you haven’t already. This is the account where your recommenders will send your letter–and they can’t write your letter until you set this up.  Click here for more information.
  4. Order your transcript(s) now if you aren’t taking summer classes. If you are taking summer classes, put a reminder on your calendar to order your transcript after August 12 (or Aug. 27 if you are a summer 2019 graduate). Note: You will need to order a transcript from every undergraduate institution where you took courses–even summer courses–so now is a good time to reach out to the registrar of any community colleges or schools from which you transferred. Here is where you order your UIUC transcript.
  5. Research law schools. The very first thing to consider is: What are your top 3 priorities in a legal education? (Location, employment, affordability, and admissibility are common priorities.) You’ll want to develop a list of 8-10 law schools that meet those priorities. You can find LSAT/GPA data, employment information, tuition, and more by using a resource like the American Bar Association’s Required Disclosure reports. On this website you will find these reports:
    1. 509 Required Disclosures = Previous year’s incoming class data such as GPA, LSAT, ethnicity, number of applicants + admits, etc., plus you can find tuition, number and amount of scholarships awarded, and transfer data.
    2. Employment Outcomes = Law schools are required to report the employment status of graduates 10 months after graduation. Here you will see how many of the law schools’s most recent grads are employed, and in what sectors.
    3. Bar Passage Outcomes = Law schools must report bar passage data about a year out. This report will show which state bar exam this school’s grads take, how many pass, and comparisons to the general state pass rate.

If you’re finished with the LSAT (not retaking it), then now is a good time to work on drafting a personal statement. We’ll post more about that in a future blog, or you can take a look at our Pre-Law Handbook (click on the Applying to Law School tab, then Personal Statements) for details.

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Free Digital Practice LSAT for Illini This Month!

Announcing…a great opportunity for pre-law Illini!

Taking the LSAT in the future? University of Illinois students and alumni have a unique opportunity to take a free digital tablet-based practice LSAT on campus on July 23!

Through a partnership between Pre-Law Advising Services and the Law School Admission Council, this digital practice LSAT will use the LSAC’s tablets on which the test is now given.

Details:

  • The LSAC’s tablet and stylus will be provided for test takers. No need to bring your own tablet.
  • The test will be administered in a realistic, proctored, timed campus environment.
  • Get a baseline score, or use it as practice for an upcoming LSAT.

Any interested Illinois student or alum may register.

  • Not currently LSAT prepping? Taking the practice LSAT cold will provide a baseline score.
  • Currently prepping for a fall (September, October, or November) LSAT? This realistic practice test on the LSAT tablet will be especially helpful.

Registration is required and seating is limited. Click this link for more details and to register. Location and other details will be provided to registrants prior to the exam.

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July LSAT Resource Extravaganza

The LSAC has released this handy one-page Friendly Reminders for July LSAT takers. Can’t view the picture above? Access the pdf here:

https://www.lsac.org/sites/default/files/media/LSAT-July_Test-Day_One-Pager.pdf

ICYMI: We’ve also posted these blogs below just for July LSAT takers.

5 Things To Know & Do for the July LSAT

July LSAT takers: A Guide to All of Your Free LSAT Retake Options

 

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5 Things To Do After the June LSAT

June LSAT scores are out!  Whether you’re applying to law school this fall or in future years, here are your next steps.

  1. Make some LSAT retake decisions. The July LSAT registration is closed, so September is your next LSAT retake option and registration is already open here. October and November are also options, but these are on Mondays and are not offered on our campus (if that is important to you). For a full consideration of upcoming LSAT options–including timing for this fall’s applicants–revisit this post. You’ll also want to start re-prepping with digital LSAT resources like these, since every LSAT Sept and later will be on a tablet.
  2. Get your letters of recommendation lined up. Have you already contacted your LOR writers and asked them to submit a letter for you? If not, do that now, because giving your writer all summer to write the letter is smart. Recent grads: Go ahead and approach your professors now, even if you don’t plan to apply for another year or two…having them submit their letter while they still remember you (and work here) is smart. Don’t wait until a super busy time for them–or come back to find that they’re retired, on medical leave, etc.–to ask. Here are some tips on getting great recommendations.
  3. Register for the Credential Assembly Service if you haven’t already. This is the account where your recommenders will send your letter–and they can’t write your letter until you set this up.  Click here for more information.
  4. Order your transcript(s) now if you aren’t taking summer classes. If you are taking summer classes, put a reminder on your calendar to order your transcript after August 12 (or Aug. 27 if you are a summer 2019 graduate). Note: You will need to order a transcript from every undergraduate institution where you took courses–even summer courses–so now is a good time to reach out to the registrar of any community colleges or schools from which you transferred. Here is where you order your UIUC transcript.
  5. Research law schools. The very first thing to consider is: What are your top 3 priorities in a legal education? (Location, employment, affordability, and admissibility are common priorities.) You’ll want to develop a list of 8-10 law schools that meet those priorities. You can find LSAT/GPA data, employment information, tuition, and more by using a resource like the American Bar Association’s Required Disclosure reports. On this website you will find these reports:
    1. 509 Required Disclosures = Previous year’s incoming class data such as GPA, LSAT, ethnicity, number of applicants + admits, etc., plus you can find tuition, number and amount of scholarships awarded, and transfer data.
    2. Employment Outcomes = Law schools are required to report the employment status of graduates 10 months after graduation. Here you will see how many of the law schools’s most recent grads are employed, and in what sectors.
    3. Bar Passage Outcomes = Law schools must report bar passage data about a year out. This report will show which state bar exam this school’s grads take, how many pass, and comparisons to the general state pass rate.

If you’re finished with the LSAT (not retaking it), then now is a good time to work on drafting a personal statement. We’ll post more about that in a future blog, or you can take a look at our Pre-Law Handbook (click on the Applying to Law School tab, then Personal Statements) for details.

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July LSAT takers: A Guide to All of Your Free LSAT Retake Options

July test takers: As you know, this is the big “transition to digital” exam, and ONLY for this exam, takers will be able to see your score, cancel if you choose, and retake for free until April 2020. It’s smart to think through your retake options now, especially if you intend to apply to law school this cycle (to enter law school in Fall 2020).

Tip: Before reading this, you may want to read our earlier blog post on 5 Things to Know & Do For the July LSAT

Let’s talk about 2 important details for considering any LSAT retake options.

  1. July LSAT scores will be released on August 28, and takers will have until September 4 to cancel that score. Given that information, let’s consider all of your LSAT retake options.
  2. The July LSAT is nondisclosed, meaning that takers will not receive a full report of questions you got correct and incorrect. Takers will only receive a score, nothing more, to study from for a retake.

Let’s consider all of the free LSAT retake options for July takers. 

September 21, 2019 LSAT. Registration is currently open here and closes on August 1.

    • July scores will be released long after the September 2019 LSAT registration deadline (August 1), so this will not be a realistic free retake option. Also, takers would have less than 1 month after July score release to prep for a retake, and that’s not a realistic time frame to see improvement.
    • This LSAT is offered on our campus. It is also the last LSAT of 2019 to be offered on a Saturday.
    • IF you really want this option because pushing to a later LSAT won’t work, then you may want to go ahead and pay to register for the September LSAT prior to August 1. You won’t get the advantage of the FREE retake, but you will still have the advantage of cancelling your July score if you aren’t satisfied with it.
    • Those who take this route would be wise to keep up with the LSAT studying until your July score is released (so that you don’t lose ground if you decide to retake), knowing that if you like your July score, you can just cancel your Sept registration and be done.
    • This LSAT is disclosed, meaning that test takers will get a full report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

October 28, 2019 LSAT. Registration for this LSAT is currently open here and closes on September 10.

    • This is the most realistic next LSAT for July retakers. (Demand will probably be high for that reason.) July takers will have 2 full months after July scores roll to prepare for October, which is a more realistic time frame to see improvement.
    • Note that this exam is on a Monday, which may mean making arrangements to miss class or work.
    • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
    • IF you plan to apply Early Decision, then this may be the latest LSAT accepted. It depends on the law school. Check the application of the law school where you plan to apply Early Decision to see whether they will accept November scores…many will not.
    • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

November 25, 2019. Registration is currently open here for this LSAT and closes on October 10.

    • IF you are planning to apply to law school this cycle (to enter in Fall 2020), then this is the latest LSAT we advise taking. (Why? The next LSAT isn’t until January 2020, which is getting late in the cycle due to rolling admissions.) This LSAT may also be too late to apply Early Decision–see the note above.
    • This exam is on a Monday, but it’s also during our Fall Break, so current students won’t have to miss class. It may be necessary to miss work.
    • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
    • For current students–This exam is very close to finals, and LSAT prep will need to be carefully balanced with academic performance throughout the fall semester.
    • This exam is disclosed, meaning that test takers will receive a full report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

January 13, 2020 LSAT. Registration is currently open here for this LSAT and closes on December 3.

    • This exam is possible for those who want to enter law school in fall of 2020, but it is getting late. Remember that in a rolling admission cycle, law schools begin accepting people–and awarding their scholarships–in September.
    • LSAT takers who are applying to law school this cycle would be wise to complete all other elements of the application as soon as this exam is over in order to apply ASAP once scores are released.
    • This exam is on a Monday, but it falls during our Winter Break, so current students will not have to miss class. It may be necessary to miss work.
    • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
    • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

February 22, 2020 LSAT. Registration for this LSAT is currently open here and closes on January 7.

    • This exam is very late in the cycle for those who are applying to law school to enter in Fall 2020. Applicants may even miss some law school application deadlines by the time February scores are released; check the deadlines of law schools you’re applying to if considering this option.
    • This may be a great option for those who aren’t applying to law school this cycle. Current students will have all of winter break to focus on LSAT prep. And, you’d be done with the LSAT before midterms–always a plus. You can spend the rest of the semester focused on your classwork.
    • This exam is on a Saturday, so current students don’t need to miss class. Alumni may not need to miss work, either.
    • This exam IS offered on our campus. Current students and local alumni can avoid travel costs and logistics.
    • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

March 30, 2020 LSAT. Registration for this LSAT is currently open here and closes on February 11.

  • This exam is not a realistic option for those who are applying to law school to enter in Fall 2020. Applicants will miss many law school  application deadlines, and many scholarships will already be awarded.
  • This may be a great option for those who aren’t applying to law school this cycle. Current students will have all of winter break AND spring break to study. And, you’d be done with the LSAT before finals. However, balancing of LSAT prep and classwork would be necessary throughout most of spring semester.
  • This exam is on a Monday (and does NOT fall during our spring break), so current students would need to miss class, and alumni may need to miss work.
  • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
  • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

April 25, 2020. This is the final FREE LSAT retake option for July 2019 LSAT takers. Registration is currently open here and closes on March 10.

  • This exam is not an option for those who are applying to law school to enter in Fall 2020. It is well past most law school application deadlines.
  • This may be a great option for those who aren’t applying to law school this cycle. Current students will have all of winter break AND spring break to study. However, this LSAT is so late in the spring that it requires balancing LSAT prep and classwork essentially the entire semester. And it’s close to finals, which is not ideal.
  • This exam is on a Saturday, so current students don’t need to miss class. Alumni may not need to miss work, either.
  • This LSAT IS offered on our campus. Current students and local alumni can avoid travel costs and logistics.
  • This exam is nondisclosed, meaning that test takers will only receive a score and will not receive a report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.
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5 Things To Know & Do for the July LSAT

July LSAT takers, this post is for you. And there are a lot of you…the LSAC reports record demand for this administration.

5 Things to Know & Do for the July LSAT

  1. All July LSAT takers should take digital practice LSATs in case you are assigned that format. The LSAC has been adding to its digital LSAT prep, which now includes a familiarization tool and 3 full length digital LSATs–Prep Tests 71, 73, and 74–here. Tip: Avoid taking Prep Tests 71, 73, and 74 in their paper format before taking the digital version so that you get a realistic performance in a digital environment. The free Khan Academy LSAT Prep site also provides opportunities to practice LSAT questions in a digital environment.
  2. In addition to taking practice digital tests, review the digital LSAT FAQs here Know all of the details of the digital setup so that you can avoid spending precious time and brain energy figuring out this new format during the test.
  3. Remember to bring these items even though you may be taking the digital exam: Number 2 pencils (no mechanical pencils are allowed), eraser, and highlighter. Even those who are taking the digital format will receive scratch paper, so you will still need those items. You’ll also need your ID, admission ticket, snack, and other allowed items in a clear ziplock bag. Review this complete list of what is–and isn’t–allowed in the test room.
  4. Don’t forget to also take the separate LSAT Writing Sample after the test. You won’t be taking it during the test–instead, after the test you will log in to a secure website at home to write your sample and submit it. If you plan to apply to law school this year, then we suggest taking the writing part within 1 week of the LSAT so that you are completely done. Law school applications will NOT be complete without a writing sample submission. Tip: Put a reminder in your calendar to take the separate writing sample.
  5. Put these dates into your calendar: July LSAT scores will be released on August 28, and you’ll have until September 4 to cancel the score.  Note that Labor Day weekend is also during that time span, so if you will be on vacation, make sure you put multiple reminders in your calendar about the deadline to cancel. These dates also have important implications for LSAT retakes, which we will cover in the next blog posting…stay tuned!
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New LSAT Test Taking Limits

Breaking news…the LSAC has just announced new LSAT test taking limits. The LSAC indicates that more details will be announced soon but for now this information is not yet posted on the LSAC website.

Here are details from the bulletin we received from the LSAC:

Starting with the September 2019 test administration, test takers will be permitted to take the LSAT:

  • Three times in a single testing year (the testing year goes from June 1 to May 31).
  • Five times within the current and five past testing years (the period in which LSAC reports scores to law schools).
  • A total of seven times over a lifetime.
  • This policy is forward-looking, not retroactive. Tests taken prior to September 2019 will not count against these numerical limits.

In addition, test takers will not be permitted to retake the LSAT if they have already scored a 180 (perfect score) within the current and five past testing years, the period in which LSAC reports scores to law schools. This policy will be applied retroactively.

There will be an appeals process for test takers who have special circumstances and want to request an exception to this policy.

To summarize:

Starting in Sept 2019, LSAT maximums are: Three times within one year; five times within the current year + past five; seven total times in a lifetime.

–Those who score a 180 (or those who scored a 180 in the current or past five testing years) cannot retake.

The LSAC will be announcing more details and adding this information to their website in the weeks ahead.

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How to select majors, minors, and classes: A Guide for Pre-Law Students

I don't know (Good Luck Charlie) | I DON'T EVEN KNOW | image tagged in i don't know good luck charlie | made w/ Imgflip meme maker

The eternal question for both incoming and continuing pre-law students is: What major/minor/classes should I take? 

Students really can major in ANYTHING and be successful in law school, but you must be a strong student in whatever you choose. Law schools don’t require any particular undergraduate major, and the American Bar Association lists skills and values, rather than particular courses, that law schools are looking for in a candidate.

You really can major in anything–but you must create an academic record of success and you should build the skills recommended for law school. Read on for what that means.

BUILDING AN ACADEMIC RECORD OF SUCCESS

Law schools want to know that applicants have demonstrated success in the classroom so that they can predict your success as you transition to much harder work in law school. A record of academic success in general means that you’ve done well, taken challenging courses, are intellectually curious, and possess certain academic skills (more on that below).

Law schools vary considerably in what they consider a “strong” record of success. Check the median GPA of the law schools that interest you here…you’ll see that the median may be anywhere from a 3.3 to a 4.0 at any particular law school. To be a strong candidate for that school, ideally you would be at the GPA median or higher.

But a GPA isn’t the whole story. Law schools also want to see that you’ve challenged yourself by taking upper level classes when appropriate, taking a rigorous (but not crazy) courseload, and taking a variety of coursework.

Balance academic challenge with success. Law schools want to see students who demonstrate academic success while taking a challenging courseload. Ideally, pre-law students would take an academic course load that is challenging both in terms of rigor and credits while still doing performing well. What does this mean, and how can you achieve it?

  • A challenging but not overwhelming course load suggestion is 15-17 credit hours. (This can vary due to individual factors, and is only a general guideline, not a mandate. Think carefully about the right course load for you.)
  • Be strategic in your course selection. Don’t take your 5 hardest classes in the same semester to get them out of the way. Work with your major advisor to determine how you can distribute those courses throughout your remaining semesters. Likewise, don’t take your 5 easiest classes at the same time–use those to give you some relief from the harder classes each semester.
  • For juniors and seniors–Move up from 1 and 200 level courses to 3 and 400 levels in order to demonstrate an appropriate level of challenge. A good general rule is no more than one 1 or 200 level course per semester for juniors and seniors (unless you must do so to graduate on time). Taking easier classes to pad a GPA is obvious to law school admissions, who know what a challenging semester looks like.

Use your major(s) and minor(s) to complement each other. If you have a major that does not necessarily demonstrate lots of writing or research skills, then selecting a minor or secondary major that does is a smart balance. Unusual combinations of majors/minors can also show a law school someone who is intellectually curious and able to succeed in a wide variety of coursework. (Example: History and Chemistry represent two different skill sets. As long as the overall GPA is still strong.)

Consider changing majors, especially if you are not able to achieve mostly As and some Bs in your coursework. Getting Cs (or below) is a sign of concern that should make a pre-law student carefully consider their choices.

Do not make course selections for these reasons:

  • I heard from a friend/roommate/sibling/the internet that this class was easy;
  • I only wanted classes on Tues/Thurs so I just picked what I could get into on those days;
  • I only wanted afternoon classes so I didn’t even consider anything in the morning;
  • I wanted to hurry up and graduate so I took a very demanding overload each semester.

What, then, are good reasons to take a course?

  • It demonstrates the skills that law schools prefer to see;
  • I like the topic and find it interesting or it is required for my major/minor;
  • It fits in well with my remaining coursework in terms of balancing rigor and the ability to do well; and
  • I talked with my academic advisor who agreed it is a good fit for me.

You must prioritize academics if law school is your goal. Don’t get distracted from your goal of law school admission. If being president of a social organization or volunteering too much affects your grades, it’s time to dial back your extracurriculars and rededicate yourself to your role as a student. Law schools will not care that the reason your grades suffered is because you were planning a big fundraiser…that shows them a lack of prioritizing and time management skills. If you must work a lot to support your education, then do your absolute best to perfect your time management skills, which will set you up well for law school and practicing law! And definitely tell law schools how much you were working during undergrad in your application so that they appreciate your balancing skills.

BUILDING ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL SKILLS FOR LAW SCHOOL

What academic skills should you build? Pre-law students must demonstrate strong research, writing, reading, and speaking skills, which can be accomplished both in and out of the classroom. These are the core skills that law schools truly care about, so take a look at your DARS and ask yourself: How many courses have you taken that develop and reflect these skills? Take courses that demonstrate those skills–they can be in any discipline. Popular options include English, History, Political Science, Philosophy, or Communication courses, but don’t feel limited to only those.

Build important personal and study skills. Right now you are building skills and habits which you will rely on when you transition to law school, where the work is much harder and infinitely more time consuming than your undergraduate studies. Now is the time to master discipline (not procrastinating), effective note taking, reading comprehension and speed, attention to detail in your writing, citing your work appropriately, giving an effective speech, and managing your time. All of these are skills that you will be expected to bring with you into your law school classroom. Utilize campus resources like tutoring, the Writers Workshop, the Counseling Center, and the many workshops and programs about building these skills. Not sure where to look? Ask your academic advisor.

Remember that grade replacement will not help for law school (click here for a refresher), so take the time to carefully consider your best course options and seek help when you need it.

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