UGL 101: Printing from a laptop

Fellow UGL’ers, we hope that these past three weeks have been great. Hopefully, you noticed the new changes at the UGL. Did you know that, not only can you print from our computers, but you can print from your very own laptop? Now you won’t have to move seats. The format form last year has changed just a bit. For your convenience, here is a UGL 101 on laptop printing. First things first, make sure you are connected to IllinoisNet. You must be logged in from this network in order to print from your laptop.

Connect to IllinoisNet from your laptop image

Connect to IllinoisNet from your laptop

After you’re connected, go to this site to continue: http://go.library.illinois.edu/webprinting

It should take you to the PaperCut system that the library uses for printing.

PaperCut is the system that the library uses for printing

PaperCut is the system that the library uses for printing

Log in with your Netid and Password. Once you’re logged in, on the left hand side, there should be a couple of options. Click on “Web Print.”

Click on

Click on “Web Print” to continue the process

After you click on “Web print”, on the right-hand side, click on “Submit a job.” This will let you select the printer and also upload your document.

Click on

Click on “Submit a Job”

Once you have clicked on “Submit a job”, it will take you to a page where you can select which printer you would like to use. The UGL has black and white printing (10 cents per page) and color printing (30 cents per page).

select a printer

Select which printer you would like to use. Black and white and color printing are available.

When you select the printer you would like to use, the next step will be to select how many copies you would like to print out.

copies image

Select how many copies you would like

Have you chosen how many copies you would like to print out? Great, to continue, you will now upload your document. Remember that it can take a couple of seconds for your document to load.

upload your doc image

Upload your document

Once you have uploaded your document and submitted the print job, a page will appear. It will show you the document you have uploaded along with what printer it will come from. The status of the print job will also be shown. The status will say “Held in a Queue”. This means that the document is ready to be printed.

print job status

This page will you the status of your print job.

To complete this print job, locate a printing station at the UGL. Once you are at the station, log in with your net id and password. Once you log in, your print job should appear. Press “Print”. Your student account will be charged and voila! You are done. So, there you have it folks. As usual, if you need any assistance, let us know and we’ll be happy to help you.

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Reader’s Advisory: DIY and New Hobbies

Hopefully you are enjoying the return to UIUC. You can keep things interesting by picking up a fun new skill or hobby. Set a goal for yourself to pick up a new skill or hobby by the end of the semester. In order to help you, the UGL has a few suggestions to help you get started.

Wired Beautiful: 30+ jewelry projects to hammer, coil, spiral, and twist by Heidi Boyd

Wired Beautiful by Heidi Boyd

Wired Beautiful by Heidi Boyd

Ever wanted to make jewelry that did not involve plastic beads and string that falls apart at a touch? Now is your chance to make your own jewelry, and hey, while you’re at it, make a nice necklace for your mom, sister, or brother.

How to Draw 1 (E-book) by Walter Foster

How to Draw 1 by Walter Foster

How to Draw 1 by Walter Foster

It’s time to sit down and finally learn how to do a decent drawing. Your fabulous stick figures do not count. Begin by learning the basic drawing techniques, step-by-step instructions, and demonstrations. Grab a pen and/or pencil and begin your journey from beginner, to Da Vinci status.

The Art of French Pastry by Jacquy Pfeiffer

The Art of French Pastry by Jacquy Pfeiffer

The Art of French Pastry by Jacquy Pfeiffer

Some of us have not been lucky to have been blessed with culinary skills. No matter what skill level, we can all agree that the good ole’ macarons, croissants, and eclairs are fabulous treats that we wish we could have at a moments notice. Here is your excuse to go to the grocery store and get everything you need for your own mini French bakery.

Podcasting: The Do-it-Yourself Guide by Todd Cochrane

Podcasting: The Do-it-Yourself Guide by Todd Cochrane

Podcasting: The Do-it-Yourself Guide by Todd Cochrane

We all have our favorite podcasts that we like to listen to daily. Sometimes, you might want to create your own thing. With this book, learn how to use podcasting software and if you’re up for it, how to create a professional studio for recording. It also addresses issues with copyright and music ownership. All the important things for creating a well made podcast from the ground up, but having fun while you do it.

Graphic Design: The New Basics by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips

Graphic Design: The New Basics by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips

Graphic Design: The New Basics by Ellen Lupton and Jennifer Cole Phillips

If you’re looking for something new that will help get a step ahead of everyone else, why not learn a little about graphic design? Computer skills + graphic design= useful and fun ability. Those employers will be impressed and you’ll have learned a new talent.

Woodcarving: Get started in a new craft and with easy-to follow projects for beginners by Peter Berry

Woodcarving : get started in a new craft with easy-to-follow projects for beginners

Woodcarving : get started in a new craft with easy-to-follow projects for beginners by Peter Berry

Why take up woodcarving? because it’s awesome. But, seriously, it’s good to learn a skill where you can use your hands, wood, and something sharp. After all, who doesn’t want to learn how to carve a cute owl? Plus, you’ll get to impress all your friends and family.

What are some hobbies or new things that you’ve wanted to learn? Do you have any new places  or new literature that you’d like to explore? Share them with us in the comments below!

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Labor Day – Reader’s Advisory

The UGL hopes everyone is enjoying their Labor Day.  To celebrate, we decided to take a look at women’s labor movement.  There are great books in our collection that describe various occupations and how women’s roles in them have changed through the years.  These are more than just the traditional “Rosie the Riveter” themes. So, scroll down and take a look at how women and their roles in society have changed.

 

The XX Factor by Alison Wolf

Ever wonder if the current social roles of women are the ones expected by the trail blazing feminists of the early 60s? In Wolf’s book, she discusses the way women’s life choices have evolved and changed from a few, such as in the home, to as varied as any choices men have. However, Wolf argues that while there has been evolution in women’s education and employment, this is still not the society many envisioned.  Read The XX Factor to learn about Wolf’s vision for equality.

Not June Cleaver edited by Joanne Meyerowitz

What comes to mind when you think 1950s housewife? Do you think of Donna Reed? In this book, Meyerowitz has gathered together different essays that attempt to revise this standard picture of 1950s women and postwar U.S. women’s history. Why is it that this white, blonde, middle class woman is the first image that comes to mind? Read this book to start changing your own mental image of women and what they’ve achieved.

 

Beyond the Typewriter by Sharon Hartman Strom

Now we are examining a more specific genre of women in labor; those that were once known as secretaries.  This book examines how women were first introduced into the world of the “office”, and how that was seen as the pinnacle of achievement. It continues through women’s growing realizations and struggles to become more than just secretaries. If you like Mad Men, and have watched Peggy and Joan struggle with these same issues, then this book’s for you.

 

A Mouthful of Rivets by Nancy Baker Wise and Christy Wise

We all know the iconic image of Rosie the Riveter, the symbol of the women’s labor movement during World War II. But what about the real women who stepped up and took on these traditionally masculine roles? What types of experiences did they face and what was their attitude about going back to the home once the war was over?  This book is full of interviews of the women who lived the life depicted by the image. If you want to know the real Rosie’s, you can start here!

 

American Women and World War II by Doris Weatherford

Instead of focusing on one possible career of women during WW II, Weatherford provides a glimpse into many professions: nurse, military, industrial and home front.  The various depictions of these women in films about WW II do not do them the justice they deserve. These women were faced with problems the likes of which they’d never encountered.  How they stepped into the breach and did more than just pick up the slack is described in this book. So, if you want to know how these real women dealt with the new and varied upheavals in their lives during this tumultuous time, pick this book up from the UGL!

Enjoy your Labor Day and celebrate by looking for these books about women in the labor movement, available in our collection here at the UGL.

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Welcome Back UIUC!

Welcome back fellow UGL’ers! Here at the UGL, we hope that you had a great summer filled with sunshine and spending time with friends and family. As you come back to UIUC, whether you are a returning student or a freshman, you’ll see some changes around campus. The UGL got a makeover over the summer, and we hope you like our new and improved look. Let’s take a tour – first, we have the brand new hard-wood floor and carpet on the upper-level.

The newly renovated UGL. Photo Courtesy of the UGL Media Commons

The newly renovated UGL. Photo Courtesy of the UGL Media Commons

Next, the tables on the upper level now have power hubs on top. This way, you’ll have no problem connecting all your devices. They even have usb ports to help charge your phones.

The new power outlets at the tables. Photo Courtesy of the UGL Media Commons

The new power outlets at the tables. Photo Courtesy of the UGL Media Commons

The carpet has been replaced and our large tables are ready for students and all their homework and project needs.

The newly renovated carpet at the UGL. Photo courtesy of Q. Barrientos

The newly renovated carpet at the UGL. Photo courtesy of Q. Barrientos

Be sure to check out the UGL’s Loanable Technology Desk. Students can check out Chromebooks, calculators, digital cameras, and much more for your class and group project needs. Be sure and browse our list of items available.

One of our student workers at the Loanable Technology Desk. Photo Courtesy of Janelle Sander.

One of our student workers at the Loanable Technology Desk. Photo Courtesy of Janelle Sander.

Are you in the mood for a movie marathon or binge watching of your favorite TV show? The UGL’s lower level has a media collection for all your watching needs. All you need is your I-Card to check them out.

The changes at the UGL have not only been physical, but there have also been changes with the hours.  Also note that library hours will vary for the first 2 weeks of classes:

-August 25-28th, Open 8 AM to midnight.
-August 29th, Open from 8AM to 10PM
-August 30th, Open from 10 AM to 10PM
-August 31st, Open from 10AM to midnight
-Closed September 1st. (Labor Day)
-September 2nd-4th, Open 8AM to midnight
-September 5th, Open 8AM-10PM
-September 6th, Open 10AM to 10PM

And finally, starting September 7th, the UGL will be open at 8AM for regular semester hours and be open 24 hours a day until Friday at midnight. on Saturdays, the UGL will be open from 10AM to midnight.

Be on the lookout for upcoming posts about the services and items the UGL has to offer. Come visit us and remember that if you have any questions, let us know. We are here to help you.

 

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Dystopian Worlds: Reader’s Advisory

August is just beginning here on campus. It’s hot, humid and, oh yes, HOT! For those of us wishing we were elsewhere, have you ever wondered what the future is going to be like? Or how the present would be different by the changing of a past outcome? There’s a whole genre of books that deal with these types of ideas and thoughts, they’re called Dystopian Worlds.

 

We here at the UGL wanted to recommend some of our favorite, lesser known books that give human past, present and future a different spin.

 

The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde

The Eyre Affair is heaven for those loving puns, books and adventure. A literary cornucopia of inside jokes for readers of any classic literature, Jasper Fforde gives us Great Britain, circa 1985. In this version of 1985, time travel is routine, cloning is a reality (dodos are the resurrected pet of choice), and literature is taken very, very seriously. England is a virtual police state where an aunt can get lost (literally) in a Wordsworth poem and forging Byronic verse is a punishable offense. All this is business as usual for Thursday Next, renowned Special Operative in literary detection. But when someone begins kidnapping characters from works of literature and plucks Jane Eyre from the pages of Brontë’s novel, Thursday is faced with the challenge of her career.

 

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

What if the Puritan lifestyle hadn’t faded away? What would the consequences of this be for both men and women? Atwood gives us just such a world, creating an extreme of the gender hierarchy in today’s society. In the novel, certain women are nothing more than brood mares, and signs are all pictures because women are no longer allowed to read.  Filled with scathing satire and dire warning, The Handmaid’s Tale is a book for those who question the need for continued feminism in society.

 

Red Rising by Pierce Brown

Fans of the Hunger Games rejoice! Here is a book that can fill the void. In this world, society is coded by color, with Gold being the highest caste in society and Red being the lowliest. Yet even young Gold’s are challenged amongst themselves for dominance. If you’ve ever thought of which Greek god you’d have an affinity with, how you’d fare in a Lord of the Flies type situation, or the lengths you’d go to in order to end societal imbalance, then read the story of Darrow, a Red in a Gold’s body, and how he faces these challenges and more.

 

When She Woke by Hillary Jordan

If you’ve ever felt ostracized by society and had your values questioned, you might relate to the story of Hannah. In a not-too-distant America, Roe v. Wade is no more, and the lines between church and state have been eradicated. Here, prisoners are not kept in cells, but thrown out into society with markers showing all the world their crimes. There are interesting parallels to Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter in both the heroine and subject matter explored. When She Woke reads like a thriller, but puts a spotlight on the politicizing of the church and how that affects society.

 

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

This book looks toward the next step in role playing technology and adventure. In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts (his name has alliteration due to the influence of Stan Lee) really feels alive is when he’s plugged into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines—puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. But when Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize.

 

These are just the tip of the dystopian world iceberg, so go ahead and feel free to search our catalog for other books with a subject search using the word dystopia to see what all is available in our collection. Dystopian worlds fill the imagination with questions such as “what might have been” or “how will this affect society”, if you’re a curious soul, take one out for a spin before it’s time to buckle down for the fall semester.  See you in the alternate reality!

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Summer Music Festivals: Reader’s Advisory

Summer music festivals have been around for over half a century here in the United States, and they’re currently more popular than ever. Seemingly every city has some form of music festival these days, whether it be a commercial behemoth like Lollapalooza or one like Champaign-Urbana’s more modest, yet still excellent, Pygmalion Festival. If you’d like to learn more about the history of music festivals, get some insights into some of the biggest festival draws playing today, or would just like to enjoy some music festivals on DVD without having to brave the heat and crowds, look no further than this carefully curated list of DVDs and books from the UGL’s popular music collection.

Monterey Pop

The Complete Monterey Pop Festival (DVD)

directed by D. A. Pennebaker

One of the first rock festivals in the United States, Monterey Pop took place in 1967 in California. Masterfully shot and recorded, this concert film shows how vibrant rock music, and the accompanying hippie subculture was in its early years. Notable moments include The Who demolishing their instruments, one of Janis Joplin’s first major performances, Jimi Hendrix lighting his guitar on fire, and soul legend Otis Redding tearing down the house. If you’re a Dylan fan, you may also be interested in Don’t Look Back, Pennebaker’s documentary of Dylan’s 1965 tour of the UK.

Gimme Shelter

Gimme Shelter (DVD)

directed by David and Albert Maysles

This film covers The Rolling Stones’ 1969 tour of the United States which culminated with a free concert festival at the Altamont Speedway in California. This concert is often considered the moment when the idyllic dream of the 1960’s began to sour (particularly in contrast to the Woodstock Festival which took place four months earlier), with several people dying, including an 18 year-old girl who was stabbed to death. Gimme Shelter depicts a great rock band at the peak of its powers, and the culture that is beginning to fray around it.

Living with The Dead

Living With The Dead: Twenty Years on the Bus with Garcia and the Grateful Dead (Book)

by Rock Scully with David Dalton

One of the most acclaimed touring bands in rock, The Grateful Dead were notorious for their long, improvisational performances and their insanely devoted fanbase (known as Deadheads) who would follow the band across the country from festival to festival.  The band’s manager, Rock Scully, recalls his wild time on the road with the band in this memoir.

you don't know me

You Don’t Know Me but You Don’t Like Me: Phish, Insane Clown Posse, and My Misadventures with Two of Music’s Most Maligned Tribes (Book)

by Nathan Rabin

In this book former AV Club writer Nathan Rabin explores two subcultures of modern music fandom; Phish fans and Juggalos. Although Rabin was not a fan of either group before beginning work on this book, he attempts to understand their cult appeal by following the bands on the road. Throughout his journey (during which he is diagnosed as bipolar), Rabin discovers that these critically reviled bands provide the deep-rooted human need for community. An excerpt of the book is available from NPR.

Mo' Meta Blues

Mo’ Meta Blues: The World According to Questlove (Book)

by Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson and Ben Greenman

Although it’s too late to catch The Roots Picnic in Philadelphia this year (there’s always next year!), you can still get a feel for the eclectic brilliance of hip-hop drummer Questlove in this memoir of his career and musical passions. Questlove is both an incisive music critic, cultural commentator (check his Vulture column on hip-hop), and an unabashed fan, making this book a must-read for hip-hop, soul, and R&B fans.

There are tons of other books on music in the UGL’s collection (you’ll want to look for the section beginning with ML), if you want to delve further into the stories of popular music. If you’re a fan of live music, you may also want to visit Smile Politely, a Champaign-Urbana culture website that provides coverage of the local music scene, including upcoming concerts. Pitchfork also has a handy guide to 2014 Music Festivals if you’re still looking to attend one. Stay cool and keep rockin’!

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The UGL Gets a Makeover

It’s almost summer! Here at the UGL, we just wrapped up a busy weekend providing you with 24 hours access to the library space and resources. We hope you also had a productive weekend studying for your finals and finishing any last papers or projects!

Undergraduate Library courtyard

The UGL is about to get a big makeover!

While you’re at home, on vacation, working at an internship, or traveling the world this summer, there are going to be some big changes going on at the UGL. Starting on Monday, May 19th, the main floor of the UGL will be closed off until August 1st due to new carpet installation on the entire floor. When you get back to school this fall, come check out the UGL’s new look!

What’s Changing for the Summer

Things will be moving around a lot, but most UGL resources will still be available.
If you have a question about finding or using something in the UGL, head downstairs to the lower level. We’re moving our circulation desk down there, and that’s where we can answer any questions you have. Here’s a brief summary of what the setup will be:

  • Books and movies are staying downstairs and are still available, but you’ll check them out downstairs at our relocated circ desk inside the media collection.
  • Media reserves, new books and magazines, and some of our loanable technology are moving to the lower level. If you have a question about what loanable tech will be available, call us and ask!
  • Textbooks on reserve will be at the Main Library Circulation Desk. There will be signs to direct you and plenty of staff members waiting to help.
  • Group study rooms will not be available. If you’d like to find a study room in another library on campus, visit our group reserve system to book a room.
  • The CITES computer lab on the upper level will not be available. For more information about other CITES computer labs across campus, visit their website. If you’re looking for a specific software, you can find a directory of software available in libraries and figure out where that software is available on campus.
  • The lower level won’t be a quiet zone this summer. Quiet study spaces can be found in many other libraries on campus.
  • The Writer’s Workshop, gaming zone, and video production studio will not be available due to the re-carpeting.
  • Media commons resouces will be available, with limitations. If you need to use the Media Commons resources, such as the audio booth or digital media software, please contact the Media Commons staff at mediacommons@illinois.edu. They will be able to help you with any questions about what specific resources will be available over the summer.

If you have any questions about what services are being provided or where a resource is located, just ask! We’ll be happy to answer any of your questions.

Summer Hours

To prepare for all these big changes (and to take a break for graduation!), the Undergraduate Library will close on Friday, May 16th, at 7pm. We’ll stay closed all weekend, and open again on Monday, May 19th, at 8:30am. We will be open during Summer I for the following hours:
Monday – Thursday: 8:30am-6pm;
Friday: 8:30am-5pm
Saturday – Sunday: 1pm-5pm.
If you want to visit another library on campus this summer, check out the whole library schedule.

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An Evening of Carnatic Violin Music

Happy Spring ya’ll! We know that finals are almost here and you are rushing to turn in last minute papers and projects. Why not take some time to relax from all the craziness? Come  to the International and Area Studies Library (located on the third floor of the Main Library building) for an evening of relaxing Carnatic violin music, along with some yummy Indian snacks and pastries!

An Evening of Carnatic Violin, April 27th, 5-7 PM, in 321 Library

An Evening of Carnatic Violin. Photo courtesy of the International and Area Studies Library

For the event, performers include veena player Saraswathi Ranganathan, mridangam player Patri Satish Kumar and Ganapathi Ranganathan on the kanjira.

So, what exactly is carnatic violin music? It is defined as the “system of music commonly associated with the southern part of the Indian subcontinent” and “It is one of two main sub-genres of Indian classical music that evolved from ancient Hindu traditions.” Want to learn more? Well, lucky for us, there is a subject guide about that! (you see, there are helpful subject guides for everything!). Be sure to take a study break and check it out!

If you would like to hear more about carnatic violin, here are some more resources like books and audio recordings from the library catalog. Be sure to arrive to the event early! It’s sure to be a full house.

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April is National Poetry Month!

Fellow UGL’ers, it’s April and spring is finally here! That means—it is also National Poetry Month! In honor of all that is poetic, the UGL’s own graduate assistants will share their favorite poet, poem, or collection of poems.

Cover Art of "Annabel Lee" by Edgar Allan Poe

“Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe

“Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe © All Rights Reserved
“This poem was the very first one that caught my attention in elementary school and it’s been on my favorite ever since.” -Quetzalli

I was a child and she was a child,
In this kingdom by the sea,
But we loved with a love that was more than love—
I and my Annabel Lee—
With a love that the wingèd seraphs of Heaven
Coveted her and me.”

Looking for more works by Edgar Allan Poe? Click here!

“Reflections on Ice-Breaking” by Ogden Nash ©  All Rights Reserved
“My favorite poem is Ogden Nash’s ‘Reflections on Ice-Breaking.’ Known for his pithy and witty poems, Nash uses wordplay to create comedy with some innate truth to it.” – Zoe

“Candy
is dandy
But liquor
is quicker.”

For other works by Ogden Nash, be sure to check out the library catalog.

Cover art of A Light in the Attic

A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein

“Overdues” by Shel Silverstein © All Rights Reserved
“I’m not really a poetry person, but I do loves me some Shel Silverstein. Here is an excerpt from A Light in the Attic.” -Angeline

“What do I do?
What do I do?
This library book is 42
Years overdue.
I admit that it’s mine
But I can’t pay the fine-
Should I turn it in
Or hide it again?
What do I do?
What do I do?”

Like what you see? Check out the whole book, A Light in the Attic.

“Having a Coke with You” by Frank O’Hara ©  All Rights Reserved
“This poem is a frank and clear exploration of the giddiness of being in love (especially with someone new) and the ways that every little aspect of a person can take on a grandiose shining light in the wash of love.” – Tad

“Having a Coke with You
is even more fun than going to San Sebastian, Irún, Hendaye, Biarritz, Bayonne
or being sick to my stomach on the Travesera de Gracia in Barcelona”

Check out the author, Frank O’Hara, reading this poem here.

Cover art of Loose Woman

Loose Woman by Sandra Cisneros

Loose Woman by Sandra Cisneros © All Rights Reserved
“An American writer, she is also the author of The House on Mango Street. She is just great!”- Christina

You bring out the Mexican in me.
The hunkered thick dark spiral.
The core of a heart howl.
The bitter bile.
The tequila lagrimas on Saturday all
through next weekend Sunday.

Check out other works by Sandra Cisneros in our catalog.

“Brown Penny” by William Butler Yeats © All Rights Reserved
“The major symbol in this poem is the ‘brown penny.’  To find out whether or not he is in love, the man flips a penny. He takes a chance. As with flipping a penny, the young man doesn’t know how it will land or what the future holds. But he risks it for love.” – Linsy

I whispered, ‘I am too young,’
And then, ‘I am old enough';
Wherefore I threw a penny
To find out if I might love.

Explore more of William Butler Yeats in our library catalog.

“Self-Portrait at 28″ by David Berman © All Rights Reserved
“David Berman is probably best known as the gravel voiced songwriter behind the (now-defunct) band Silver Jews, but he’s also a damn good poet on paper. His excellent book of poetry, Actual Air, contains one of my favorite poems, ‘Self-Portrait at 28.’ The last couple stanzas get me every time.” – Ira

“You see,
his mind can only hold one thought at a time
and when he finally hears me call his name
he looks up and cocks his head
and for a single moment
my voice is everything:
Self-portrait at 28.”

There you have it, folks! All of these wonderful poems are available through the library catalog. Happy Poetry Month!

 

Note: These works are not owned by the library

© All Rights Reserved

 

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St. Patty’s is here!

Hello UGLers, as you can tell by the seas of green today, it is St. Patrick’s Day! Are we all wearing our green today? You bet we are! There are many ways to celebrate St. Patrick’s day, so here at the UGL we decided to find all things Irish for your celebration.

The Green River in Chicago

The Green River in Chicago. Photo courtesy of bhenak via Flickr

You can start off your day by heading over to Crane Alley for some Irish-inspired food. They are having that especially for today! Located in downtown Urbana, Crane Alley is a great restaurant to share a meal with your friends.

If you’re feeling like staying in tonight, why not make a night of it with a movie (or movie marathon) and some friends. The UGL has their media collection in the lower level and we have found some titles that will be sure to give you different perspectives on Ireland without having to leave your comfy couch.

First, we have “Angela’s Ashes.” A movie that was based off the memoirs of Irish writer, Frank McCourt. It is the story of his family’s struggles with poverty and his childhood in Ireland and New York.

Angela’s Ashes

If this is not your style, fear not! we have other suggestions. Such as “P.S I Love You.” OK, we admit, this is not related to St. Patrick’s day, but you cannot beat the Irish scenery in this movie. Also, Hillary Swank and Gerard Butler are in it, so you pretty much have to watch it.

P.S I love you movie

P.S I love You

Other movies that you might find interesting are “Leap Year” and “The Commitments.”

Sometimes, you just want to stay in with a good book, so of course, the UGL has recommendations for those as well! Our first recommendation is a cookbook! because there is no better way to spend the holiday than to cook up some great Irish food with some friends. How about “The Irish Heritage Cookbook” or “Rachel’s Irish Family Food: 120 classic recipes from my home to yours.” Gather your friends, turn on some Celtic music, and try your hand at these recipes.

Rachel's Irish Family Food cooking book

Rachel’s Irish Family Food

Want to travel to Ireland without having to pay all that airfare? Try “Travelers’ Trails in Ireland.” Read about 20 trails that will guide you on a tour of all the culture and beautiful scenery that Ireland has to offer! Other titles to check out might be “Silver Linings: Travels around Northern Ireland“, and “Memory Ireland.”

Travellers' Travels in Ireland  book

Travellers’ Travels in Ireland

The UGL and the other libraries on campus have tons of more books for you, so, what are you waiting for? Check it out and have a great St. Patrick’s Day!

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