2022 – 2023 Year In Review

The 2022 – 2023 academic year was busy and filled with many successes! To our UIUC pre-law students and alumni, congratulations on a successful academic year and application cycle! Our thanks to our UIUC pre-law student & alumni leaders, law expert volunteers, and all those who helped support our over 1500 prelaw Illini this academic year!

Read below for some highlights from this year!

Advising Appointments

PLAS held over 800 advising appointments (and counting) this year! Individual advising appointments are a great way to explore your individual goals and plans including determining if a legal education and career is the right choice for you! Advising sessions afford the opportunity to receive expert guidance on the pre-law undergraduate experience, ways to prepare for law school, internship & post-graduation opportunities, and the law admissions process. We welcome the opportunity to support you in a successful journey to law school. We loved meeting with all of you!

Workshops & Events

This academic year, PLAS hosted over 50 student workshops and events, including Pre-Law 101, Pre-Law for Parents, Drafting Your Application, Application Roadmap, Selecting a Law School, Strategies for Spring Application Success, and more! Workshops & events are a perfect way to gain invaluable expert insights and specialized topics in a very efficient way. For those contemplating applying during the 2023-2024 admission cycle – be sure to check the events calendar for the summer editions of Application Roadmap & Drafting Your Application! Note – PLAS programming is open to all UIUC current students and alumni!

New Programs

This year, PLAS created four new initiatives: the Pre-Law Advisory Council, APPtitude Certificate Program, and LSAT Jumpstart workshop series, and the I Am Ready: Law Admission Readiness Program co-hosted with the University of Illinois College of Law! Each of these initiatives expanding on existing PLAS resources and services, creating more unique support and opportunities for our UIUC pre-law students and alumni! Thanks to all who participated in the inaugural year for these programs!

Law School Fair & Law Dean Panel

This past Fall, admissions representatives from 85 law schools from across the country visited campus to engage with nearly 400 students in central Illinois. The 2023 Law School Fair was held in-person, on campus for the first time since 2019 and was hosted as part of the annual Midwest Association of Pre-Law Advisors (MAPLA) Caravan. We also featured a law school panel the night before at the Law Building!

Save the Date for the 2023 Law School Fair on October 5!

Pre-Law Pop-Ups

This April, PLAS hosted 4 separate pop-ups to engage with students around campus. We met with students at Grainger Engineering, Gies Success Lab, Ikenberry, and at IUB to answer questions about the pre-law path and share information about our office resources! We look forward to seeing you around campus again next year!

Blog Posts

We uploaded over 40 articles to our blog this year that covered insights from attorneys, helpful tips & resources regarding the pre-law path, monthly events, and more! We will continue to create content for the blog this summer so be sure to stay tuned and check back for updates!

Legal Expert Volunteers

A huge thank you to the attorneys, law professors, and other law experts who volunteered their time to engage with students through programming and 1:1 meetings this year, including our featured panelists and the 10+ alumni featured on the Alumni Attorney Talks blog series!

Thank you to all our pre-law students, alumni, and law expert volunteers for making it a great year!

Law School Insider: Favorite Specialized Law School Courses

Welcome to Law School Insider! In this multi-part blog series, you will hear directly from current law students about their favorite courses, law school myths, best tips, and more!

In this second post of the series, you will hear about all-time favorite specialized and upper-level (2L – 3L year) law school classes and why your fellow Illini chose them.

Antitrust

“Antitrust law was my favorite law school class. I was an economics major in undergrad, and antitrust allowed me to apply what I learned in undergrad to a legal setting. Antitrust law is one of the most quantitative and policy-focused areas of the law in my opinion, which is a welcome break from most law school classes.”

-Ben T. | University of California Berkley School of Law

Aviation Law

“I loved my Aviation Law class because I am interested in all things aerospace and defense, and it was a unique class that covered a lot of different topic areas in aviation. It was co-taught by two professors who both have extensive experience practicing law in this field (one is even a pilot) and they were both fascinating — it was an honor to learn from them.”

-Erica H. | George Washington University School of Law

Corporate Compliance

“Corporate Compliance. It is funny to see how businesses try and manipulate legal terms.”

-Nick S. | University of Illinois College of Law

Criminal Procedure

“Criminal (Procedure) Adjudications because it tracks a logical timeline from arrest to sentence.”

-Sanjiv S. | University of Illinois College of Law

“Criminal Procedure I (Investigation). Great Professor and interesting constitutional issues that align with my personal interests. It’s a great course for applying very arguable legal principles to diverse facts.”

-Noah S. | William & Mary Law School

“Constitutional Criminal Procedure. I went into law school interested in criminal justice reform, and so learning more about the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments in-depth has been intellectually fulfilling and applicable to my future practice.”

-Tara S. | Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

“Criminal procedure, because there are so many nuances about criminal procedure that everyday citizens may not know about, so knowing some of those things, is not only applicable to representing clients but your personal conduct with police.”

-Maciek C. | University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School

Critical Race Theory

“My favorite law school class is Critical Race Theory. Learning how the law is deeply invested in and reinforces inequitable power structures is essential to my understanding of what kind of advocate I want to be and how I intend to approach the legal field to uplift marginalized communities.”

-Karen C. | UC Davis School of Law

Deposition Advocacy

“Deposition Advocacy. It was a very practical class. I learned a lot and the workload was very reasonable.”

-Vanessa A. | Loyola University Chicago School of Law

First Amendment Law

“First Amendment Law is my favorite! My professor is engaging, knowledgeable, and does a great job facilitating class discussion. It’s really important to try taking classes with good professors if you can help it. The material of the class is really interesting, and I have developed a much deeper understanding of the theory and practicality of the First Amendment from this course!”

-Skylar R. | Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Information Privacy

“Information Privacy because it incorporates a lot of legal disciplines and is very timely.”

-Alberto V. | University of Chicago Law School

International Law

“I’m taking international law as my 1L elective, which is by far my favorite class. I’m interested in international environmental law, and it’s been wonderful to have an opportunity to study that subject while still in my first year. I definitely recommend taking an elective 1L year, being able to study something you’re passionate about can be a nice break from the required 1L doctrinal courses that you may not feel as personally invested in.”

-Amanda W. | Duke University School of Law

Professional Sports Law

“Professional Sports Law, it is ultimately what I came to school for and gives me real-world insight into the intersection of sports and law.”

-Austin M. | Marquette University Law School

Sovereign Debt & Financial Stability

“Sovereign Debt & Financial Stability. It has been a practical and timely look into lawyers’ roles in preventing and resolving financial crises.”

-Sydney S. | Georgetown University Law Center

Trial Advocacy

“Trial advocacy. It teaches you how to operate in the courtroom and is the first experiential class you can take in law school.”

-Mallory M. | University of Illinois College of Law

DID YOU MISS PART ONE?

Click here to read what current law students are saying are their favorite first-year courses!

April Snapshot

April 1: 2023-2024 Pre-Law Advisory Council Applications Now OpenFor more information and to apply, click here.

April 3: Apply for CLEO’s ASAP (Achieving Success in the Application Process)Applications are now open! Select from multiple dates. For more information and to apply, click here.

April 1: DEADLINE! Sidney B. Williams, Jr. Scholar Program | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 1: DEADLINE! Davis-Putter Scholarship Fund | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 1: DEADLINE! John S. Manos, Esq., Memorial Graduate Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 1: 2023 Illinois Latino Law Student Association Forum | 8:00 am – 4:00 pm25 E Jackson Blvd Chicago, IL 60604. For more information, click here.

April 3: Apply for “Explore Law” FREE with Penn State Law! | June 12-15 on Zoom. Registration closes April 30. For more information and to apply, click here.

April 4: DEADLINE! First Generation College Student Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 4: University Library Academic Success Series: Imposter Syndrome | 1:00 pm Main Library 106. For more information, click here.

April 4: FREE Killer Games Workshop presented by TestMasters | 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm. For more information and to register, click here.

April 4: Diving into Neurodiversity: A Guide for Staying Well in a Neurotypical World | 7:00 pm in Education Building 323. For more information, click here.

April 5: Fulbright Scholarship Information Session | 8:30 am ONLINE. For more information, click here.

April 5: Washington & Lee Law Group General Information Session | 12:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 5: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series | 12:00 pm in Education Building 242. For more information, click here.

April 5: Pre-Law Pop-Up! | 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm at Grainger Engineering. For more information, click here.

April 5: AccessLex Webinar – Law Student Panel: The Inside Scoop | 7:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 6: Pre-Law Advisory Council Information Session | 12:30 pm Via Zoom. To learn more, click here.

April 6: DEADLINE! Law School Opportunity Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 6: AccessLex Webinar — Choosing a Law School | 3:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 6: Counseling Center’s Perfectionism Series | 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm in Lincoln Hall 2043. For more information and to register, click here.

April 6: Application Roadmap | 4:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here. Registration closes on April 5 at 11:59 pm.

April 10: DEADLINE! Last day to apply to be an I-STAR for Undergraduate Admissions! | For information and to apply, click here.

April 10: Sign-up for CLEO’s Pre-Law Summer Institute! | Applications close May 1st. For more information and to register, click here.

April 10: Join MAFA and Apply to be on the Executive Board! | Member registration closes June 1 and Executive Board applications close April 21st. To register, click here. To apply for executive board, click here.

April 10: Pre-Law Advisory Council Information Session | 4:00 pm Via Zoom. To learn more, click here.

April 10: Liberals, Conservatives, and the Climate of Fear: How Campus Free Speech is Failing and How it Can be Saved | 12:00 pm in Room C at UIUC College of Law. For more information, click here.

April 11: Pre-Law 101 Session One | 4:00 pm at TBD. For more information and to register, click here. Registration closes on April 10 at 11:59 pm.

April 11: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series | 5:30 pm in Everitt Lab 1302. For more information, click here.

April 11: AccessLex Webinar — Applying to Law School | 7:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 11: It’s Not You, It’s Us: Supporting a Friend in Distress | 7:00 pm in Education Building 4G. For more information, click here.

April 12: Washington & Lee Law Virtual Admissions Wednesdays| 9:30 am – 2:30 pm. Take the opportunity to speak with an admission representative, a current student, or join a thematic group session every Wednesday. For more information, click here.

April 12: Pre-Law Pop-Up! | 11:00 am – 1:00 pm at Ikenberry. For more information, click here.

April 12: Fulbright Scholarship Information Session | 12:00 pm ONLINE. For more information, click here.

April 12: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series | 12:00 pm in Education Building 242. For more information, click here.

April 12: Virtual Tours with the University of Miami Law | 12:30 – 1:30 pm every Wednesday. For more information and to register, click here.

April 13: AccessLex Webinar — Applying to Law School: A Strategic Approach to Underrepresented Students | 11:00 am ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 13: Counseling Center’s Perfectionism Series | 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm in Lincoln Hall 2043. For more information and to register, click here.

April 13: Fulbright Scholarship Information Session | 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm in Lincoln Hall 1002. For more information, click here.

April 13: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series | 6:00 pm in ISR Seminar Room A. For more information, click here.

April 13: AccessLex Webinar – Law Student Panel: The Inside Scoop | 7:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 14-15: April LSAT – Good luck to everyone taking the LSAT this weekend!

April 15: DEADLINE! Federal Circuit Bar Association Board Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 15: DEADLINE! Federal Circuit Bar Association Need-Based Scholarships | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 15: DEADLINE! Giles Sutherland Rich Memorial Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 15: DEADLINE! Helen W. Nies Memorial Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 15: DEADLINE! Howard T. Markey Memorial Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 15: Diverse Lawyer Pipeline Initiative Bridging the Gap: Making the Dream of Law School a Reality | 10:00 am – 2:30 pm on Zoom. For more information and registration, click here.

April 17: LAST DAY to Apply for the 2023-2024 Pre-Law Advisory Council | For more information, click here.

April 18: Fulbright Personal Statement Workshop | 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm ONLINE. For more information, click here.

April 18: Pre-Law 101 Session Two | 4:00 pm at TBD. For more information and to register, click here. Registration closes April 17 at 11:59 pm.

April 18: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series | 5:30 pm in Everitt Lab 1302. For more information, click here.

April 18: AccessLex Webinar — Paying for Law School | 1:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 18: Counseling Center’s Test Anxiety Program | 4:00 pm in Lincoln Hall 2043. For more information, click here.

April 18: #BeReal: Navigating Authenticity and Social Media | 7:00 pm Huff Hall 114. For more information, click here.

April 19: Pre-Law Pop-Up! | 4:00 pm at Gies for Gies students. For more information, click here.

April 19: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series | 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information, click here.

April 19: Roosevelt University Paralegal Studies Program Information Session | 6:30 pm ONLINE. For more information and to register, click here.

April 20: Counseling Center’s Perfectionism Series | 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm in Lincoln Hall 2043. For more information and to register, click here.

April 20: Fulbright Personal Statement Workshop | 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm in IUB 514. For more information, click here.

April 20: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series | 6:00 pm in ISR Seminar Room A. For more information, click here.

April 21: DEADLINE! Last day to apply for MAFA Executive Board! | To apply, click here.

April 24: Application Roadmap| 4:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here. Registration closes April 23 at 11:59 pm.

April 25: DEADLINE! Last day to register for the June LSAT! | To sign-up, click here.

April 25: Fulbright Scholarship ETA Workshop | 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm ONLINE. For more information, click here.

April 25: There Is Always Light if You’re Brave Enough to See it: Building Hope and Resilience | 7:00 pm on Zoom. For more information, click here.

April 26: Pre-Law Pop-Up! | 12:00 pm – 2:00 pm in 514 IUB. For more information, click here.

April 26: AccessLex Webinar – Building Your Law School Budget | 5:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 26: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series | 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 27: Access Lex Webinar – Your Law School Investment | 7:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

April 28: DEADLINE! National Council on International Trade Development (NCITD) Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 28: Yellow Peril Redux speech series – “The Yellow Peril and the Law” | 2:30 pm on Zoom. For more information, click here.

April 28: Fulbright Scholarship ETA Workshop | 3:00 pm ONLINE. For more information, click here.

April 30: DEADLINE! Living with a Sense of Purpose Scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

April 30: DEADLINE! Last day to apply for “Explore Law” FREE with Penn State Law! | June 12-15 on Zoom. For more information and to apply, click here.

Law School Insider: Favorite First-Year Law School Courses

Welcome to Law School Insider! In this multi-part blog series, you will hear directly from current law students about their favorite courses, law school myths, best tips, and more!

In this first post of the series, you will hear about all-time favorite first-year law school classes and why your fellow Illini chose them.

First-Year Courses

Although each law school will have unique features to their curriculum, all law schools have a required set of first-year courses in the foundational subjects for legal studies. In addition to courses in legal research and writing, these first-year subjects include Civil Procedure, Constitutional Law, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property, and Torts. In addition, some schools offer first-year students the option to take an elective course(s) in addition to their required coursework. Keep reading to learn more!

Civil Procedure

“Civil Procedure! I loved getting deep into the weeds of rules and technicalities and learning how to use them strategically in litigation. And you’ll learn a lot of fun legal jargon like pro hac vice and certiorari!”

-Haydn L. | University of Michigan Law School

“Civil Procedure because it allowed me to learn about the process of civil cases and how cases eventually make it to court. My professor was also a great teacher.”

-Jillian W. | New England Law Boston

“Civil Procedure because it is a rule-based class.”

-Taylor H. | University of Illinois College of Law

“Civ Pro. Enthusiastic professor using basketball analogy for rules in FRCP. Felt like trying a new sport instead of learning a complicated matter in law school.”

-Randy X. | Chicago-Kent College of Law

Contracts

“It’s technical, but it also makes a lot of logical/reasonable sense to someone with no legal background. We’ve been making contracts with one another since we were 4 years old (“I’ll trade you my snack for yours”). All of that comes down to basic contract law.”

-Michael B. | University of Illinois Chicago School of Law

“I really enjoyed contracts. I was an accounting major and spent over 4 years in consulting, so I think it played to my business background and strengths.”

-Grant L. | UCLA

“Contracts – it teaches you how to ensure you don’t get taken advantage of.”

-Matthew M. | UNLV William S. Boyd School of Law

“My favorite doctrinal class was contract law. I enjoyed learning about a type of law that is different than criminal law that you might have seen on tv before law school.”

-Darius C. | Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

“I enjoyed contract law because I found it to be both interesting and practical. The rules governing contracts are clear and well-defined, which provides a level of certainty and predictability that is often lacking in other classes. I have also found that it has come up most frequently in my upper-level classes and internships compared to any other first-year class.”

-Ashley T. | George Washington University School of Law

“My favorite class was Contracts because it was a slow burn to come to a point of understanding in the class. The cold calls were the most terrifying, but I admire the way that legal and business interests come to a head in contracts.”

-Margaret B. |DePaul University College of Law

Criminal Law

“Criminal Law is a very interesting and engaging class.”

-Kayla C. | DePaul University College of Law

“I really enjoy Criminal Law. I have no interest in prosecution or criminal defense, but the material is very interesting.”

-Stella G. | IU Maurer School of Law

Property

“I loved property law because it was very straightforward and to the point. Although there were exceptions to the default rules, it seemed very rule-based and straightforward.”

-Cierra M. | University of Illinois College of Law

“So far, property. The class was taught by an extremely engaging professor and it truly makes you see the world in a different view.”

-Justin M. | Loyola Law School, Los Angeles

“Property. Lots of interesting historical and theoretical background.”

-Khalil R. | University of Chicago Law School

Torts

“Torts is sort of like a puzzle that you try to see if the facts can fit into the rule. It was challenging, but rewarding when you come to the correct answer.”

– Joseph A. | University of Illinois Chicago School of Law

“Torts has been my favorite class so far. My professor was really great and was able to simplify the most difficult topics. In addition, I really liked the textbook in the course because it gave only the information that we needed. I felt like the course gave me a great overview of Torts, and my internship this summer will be focused on civil litigation.”

-Mackenzie M. | University of Illinois College of Law

“I love torts because the reasoning is very straightforward and rule-based.”

– Clara T. | Southern Illinois University School of Law

First-Year Electives

Some law schools allow first-year law students to select an elective course. See below for some favorites!

First Amendment Law

“First Amendment Law is my favorite! My professor is engaging, knowledgeable, and does a great job facilitating class discussion. It’s really important to try taking classes with good professors if you can help it. The material of the class is really interesting, and I have developed a much deeper understanding of the theory and practicality of the First Amendment from this course!”

-Skylar R. | Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

International Law

“I’m taking international law as my 1L elective, which is by far my favorite class. I’m interested in international environmental law, and it’s been wonderful to have an opportunity to study that subject while still in my first year. I definitely recommend taking an elective 1L year, being able to study something you’re passionate about can be a nice break from the required 1L doctrinal courses that you may not feel as personally invested in.”

-Amanda W. | Duke University School of Law

STAY TUNED!

Stay tuned for the next edition of Law School Insider: Favorite Law Courses Part II where will hear from current law students about their favorite upper-level courses!

Summer and Fall Recommended Course Charts

Recommended Course Lists

It is that time of the year again! Registration for Summer and Fall 2023 is just around the corner!  Law schools do not require any particular major or coursework. Students in ANY major can attend law school, and there are NO specifically required courses for pre-law undergrads. However, given an interest in law, we have compiled a list of suggested summer and fall courses that pre-law students may find helpful and interesting.

In general, students interested in going to law school should take classes that focus on analytical and critical thinking, communication, research and writing, and when possible – legal topics of interest. The recommended course list includes classes from many different disciplines that might serve one, or more, of these goals.  Take a look at the chart to find courses that are both interesting to you and will help build the necessary skills for law school.

Please keep in mind that these lists should not be viewed as exhaustive as there are many beneficial courses offered each semester.  These lists should be used to highlight courses of particular interest and give a broad overview of options. 

Want to learn more?

See what fellow Illini say are some of their favorite pre-law related courses at Illinois…

Ben Mulaomerovic

Ben is currently the Class of 2025 Representative of the PLAS Advisory Council Ben is studying Finance and Accounting. He shared the following perspectives on his favorite pre-law related courses…

  • FIN 241 – Fundamentals of Real Estate – Introduction to Real Estate Transactions, Property Rights & Regulation. Currently taught by practicing lawyer Scott E. Perkins who provides unique insight into the daily life of a practicing real estate lawyer and applicable real-life examples. Great foundational class for those with an initial interest in property/real estate transaction law and finance. 
  • BADM 300 – The Legal Environment of Business – Although currently a mandatory aspect course of the business curriculum, BADM 300 is truly a fantastic introduction to corporate law and its many implications for current events, M&A, shareholder defense and so much more! The class is taught by Professor Warnick, who invests in students both inside and outside the classroom to ensure students with a particular interest in law have relevant insight into the life of a practicing corporate lawyer! 

Justin Davis

Justin is currently the Class of 2023 Representative of the PLAS Advisory Council and president of UIUC Accounting Club. He shared the following perspectives on his favorite pre-law related courses…

  • PHIL 102 – Logic and Reasoning – It was a great introduction to applying critical thinking to a text and then writing down your analysis.
  • BADM 300 – The Legal Environment of Business This was my first perspective on what laws apply to corporations. It also provided a glimpse into liability, constitutional law, and the hierarchy of federal vs state laws.

Jack McNabb

Jack is currently a pre-law student of the Class of 2023, studying Sociology and Business & Informatics. Here are his perspectives on his list of favorite pre-law related courses…

  • BADM 340 – Ethical Dilemmas of Business – I am currently taking this course and I have enjoyed it thus far. As the name states, this course explores some large ethical issues facing the current business world and could be valuable to students interested in business law.

Sruthi Navneetha

Sruthi is currently the At-large Representative of the PLAS Advisory Council, president of Phi Alpha Delta, and president and founder of Women In Law Pre-Law Society. She shared the following perspective on her favorite pre-law related course…

  • ECON 437 – Game Theory This can really help with other pre-law-related classes as topics in this class reappear in almost even Political Science class. It also helps people think critically, which is essential to scoring well on the LSAT.

Alex Nevarez

Alex is currently the Class of 2023 Representative of the PLAS Advisory Council, president of Pre-Law Honors Society, and vice-president of Kappa Alpha Pi. These are her favorite pre-law related courses…

  • PHIL 103 – Logic and Reasoning QR 2 – This is the most important course I have taken because it is directly applicable to the LSAT. In this course, you learn logic, symbolic logic, and essentially a new way of thinking. This new way of thinking is directly applicable to the LSAT as there are two logic sections. Because I had already taken this course when I started LSAT studying the logic sections came easy to me because my brain already had logical thinking background.
  • PHIL 104 – Intro to Ethics – In this course, it is logic, ethics, and writing combined. You cover three hot topics and read from philosophers coming from both sides and then you will write a paper on who you believe is right for each topic. The material is extremely in-depth and eye-opening and it aided me in helping me create good and sound arguments. I grew as a thinker and a writer.

Considering a minor?

Check out this informative video about the Legal Studies Minor, including a Q&A with Professor Jennifer Pahre: 

Visit the Legal Studies Minor website to learn more or email:  

law-undergrad@illinois.edu!

Still not sure what to take? 

Schedule a pre-law advising meeting to discuss course options!

Experiential Learning in Law School

An important part of a law school curriculum is the hands-on, applied, experiential learning opportunities that a prospective law school offers. Law schools offer many different types of experiential learning that allow students to “practice” and develop lawyering skills before graduation.  You can learn more about experiential learning from the ABA rules governing legal education. Here are a few of the common experiential learning opportunities present at law schools:

Actual/Real Client Experiential Courses

The following types of experiential courses provide students with the opportunity to work on legal matters for actual/real clients.  This work is conducted under the supervision of licensed attorneys.

Clinics

  • A law clinic is a type of experiential learning program in which law students provide legal services to clients under the supervision of licensed attorneys. Law clinics are typically operated by law schools “in-house” or in partnership with external legal service-providing institutions. They offer students the opportunity to gain practical experience in the law while providing valuable services to the community. Law clinics typically specialize in a specific area of law ranging from immigration to housing to civil rights to family to criminal to financial to veterans’ affairs. Clinics often provide legal assistance to underserved populations, such as low-income individuals or victims of domestic violence.

    Clinics are credit-earning courses that are managed by a faculty member, who is also typically the supervising attorney. Through clinics students typically attend a class session as well as conduct legal work. Students may engage in a variety of legal activities, such as conducting legal research, drafting legal documents, representing clients in court, and negotiating with opposing parties. In some states, law students enrolled in clinics may need to apply for a special student license with the Board of Bar Examiners. In Illinois, this is called a “711 License”.

Field Placements

  • Field placement is an experiential opportunity where law students have the opportunity to earn credit while also participating in actual client legal work.  Field placements may be very similar to clinics, however, they are often taught by an adjunct faculty member who is not a full-time member of the law school faculty and may only be offered during certain semesters. Field placements are typically partnerships with existing government or legal aid offices already providing legal services within the community. In addition to the legal work conducted by students under the supervision of a licensed attorney, there is also a course component that may include lectures or regular assignments. One of the most common types of field placement courses is an externship – read more on those below!
Externships

  • A legal externship is an experiential learning opportunity in which law students work with practicing attorneys or judges to gain practical experience in the legal profession.  Legal externships are basically credit-earning “internships”.  In a legal externship, students secure a position with an organization such as a government agency or nonprofit legal aid organization working under the supervision of a licensed attorney or judge.

    During the externship, students may engage in legal research, draft legal documents, attend court proceedings, participate in client meetings, and do other legal activities. Externships are credit earning and are typically unpaid, although some may be paid depending on the externship program and specific placement.


    Legal externships are available in a variety of legal practice areas, including civil rights, criminal defense, corporate law, environmental law, intellectual property law, and more. Participating in a legal externship can be a valuable experience for law students, as it enables them to gain practical skills, make professional connections, earn credit hours toward their degree, and gain insight into the legal profession.  Externships are very popular activities for students during the summer between 1L and 2L year, and some students will also participate in externships during the academic year.

Simulated Learning

Simulated experiential courses provide students the opportunity to develop skills necessary to practice law by recreating real-life legal scenarios and procedures. These courses do not provide include actual client work.

Trial Advocacy

  • Trial courts are courts of first review for legal issues where issues of evidence and facts are determined.

    For example, in a criminal trial for murder, a prosecutor will attempt to present sufficient evidence to support a guilty verdict, asking the jury to determine if there is enough evidence (facts) to prove the defendant committed the crime of murder as the law defines murder.

    Trial advocacy courses in law school are designed to teach law students the practical skills necessary to be effective advocates in a trial setting including oral advocacy, courtroom strategy, motion practice, and evidence presentation.

    In trial advocacy courses, students are taught to master the art of persuasion and to develop techniques for communicating complex legal concepts to juries in a compelling and understandable manner. The curriculum also includes instruction on the principles of evidence, the rules of courtroom procedure, and the strategies and tactics of trial advocacy.

    Trial advocacy courses usually include simulated trials where students are required to present opening statements, conduct direct and cross-examinations of witnesses, introduce evidence, and present closing arguments. In addition to simulations, trial advocacy courses often involve lectures, workshops, and seminars.
Moot Court

  • Moot court is a curricular offering in law schools that simulates appellate court proceedings. Appellate courts consider cases in which a trial court has previously issued a judgment.

    For example: If a defendant was convicted of murder by a trial court, defense attorneys may choose to appeal that verdict to an appellate court.

    Appellate courts consider issues of law and therefore require different procedures. Moot court allows students the opportunity to enhance legal writing, advocacy skills, legal analysis, and oral argument abilities.

    Moot court involves a hypothetical case that is typically based on real legal issues. Students are provided a packet of information that simulates a trial court record and judgment. Students will research legal issues presented in the “trial court packet” and then draft a “legal brief”. Students will work in teams and consider 2-4 legal issues which they will argue in their brief supported by existing case law. Once briefs are completed, students will prepare an oral argument to present to a panel of “judges” typically comprised of law professors, practicing attorneys, or judges who represent an appellate court. Oral arguments are typically timed as in real court proceedings, and students are expected to argue convincingly, persuasively, and professionally.

    Moot court classes often include an internal law school competition, however, there are many moot court competitions hosted annually each year across the country. Students may compete in these external annual competitions for credit after advancing from the internal moot court competition or having been selected through tryouts. Some students may compete in such competitions as an extracurricular activity if their law school does not have a credit-earning team.

    Moot court provides law students with a valuable opportunity to develop essential advocacy skills, such as legal writing, critical thinking, legal research, public speaking, and persuasion.

Additional Simulated Courses

Law schools offer simulated courses in many different aspects of legal practice. Some common types of additional simulated courses are listed below:

Negotiation Courses

  • Negotiation courses teach law students the skills and techniques necessary to effectively negotiate in legal settings through hypothetical scenarios. These courses also provide students with a strong foundation in the theory and practice of negotiation, emphasizing the importance of preparation, communication, and problem-solving through regular lectures.

    Negotiation courses often emphasize the importance of communication skills in negotiation, including active listening, effective questioning, and persuasive speaking. Students learn to develop and deliver persuasive arguments, build rapport with their negotiating partners, and manage emotions and conflicts that may arise during negotiations.

    Negotiation courses are important as these are essential skills and knowledge for any legal practice.
Client Counseling

  • Client counseling is a course offered in law school that focuses on developing skills in communication, problem-solving, and relationship-building with clients. The goal of the course is to help law students become more effective in working with clients in a variety of legal contexts, such as litigation, transactional law, or alternative dispute resolution.

    In client counseling courses, students learn techniques for effective communication with clients, such as active listening, empathetic response, and effective questioning. They also learn strategies for problem-solving and decision-making with clients, such as identifying the client’s goals, assessing legal risks, and evaluating potential outcomes. Client counseling courses may also cover ethical considerations in working with clients, such as confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and informed consent.
Arbitration

  • Arbitration is a form of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) in which parties agree to resolve their disputes outside of court through a neutral third party, called an arbitrator. Arbitration courses in law school focus on the principles and practices of arbitration, including the law and ethics surrounding arbitration, the process and procedures involved in arbitration, and the role of the arbitrator.

    In arbitration courses, students learn the legal framework that governs arbitration, such as the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA) and state arbitration laws. They also learn the ethical considerations involved in serving as an arbitrator, such as avoiding conflicts of interest, maintaining impartiality, and ensuring procedural fairness.

    Students are also taught the procedures involved in arbitration, including the selection of arbitrators, the submission of evidence, the presentation of arguments, and the issuance of awards. They may also learn about specialized types of arbitration, such as labor arbitration or international arbitration.

Attorney + Social Justice – What does it really mean?

Social justice is at the forefront of many things, and with good reason. In fact, more and more law school admission professionals have indicated an increase in student applications reflecting interest in pursuing a law career to become social justice advocates.

But what does it mean to be a social justice advocate? And, more specifically, what does social justice mean in the legal context? How can you, as a future attorney, gather the skills and information necessary to become the social justice advocate you desire to be?

This post explores what it looks like to be a social justice advocate and a practicing attorney.

Defining Social Justice

Merriam-Webster defines social justice as “a state or doctrine of egalitarianism.” Britannica states that “social justice, in contemporary politics, social science, and political philosophy, the fair treatment and equitable status of all individuals and social groups within a state or society.” The term also is used to refer to social, political, and economic institutions, laws, or policies that collectively afford such fairness and equity and is commonly applied to movements that seek fairness, equity, inclusion, self-determination, or other goals for currently or historically oppressed, exploited, or marginalized populations.

The term appears (although not defined) in The Federalist Papers No. 7. You can also find elements of social justice in theories such as Critical Race Theory, Motivational Interviewing, and Baxter-Magolda’s Theory of Self-Authorship.

In the legal sense, the definition is similar: “Social justice is justice that follows the principle that all individuals and groups are entitled to fair and impartial treatment. Social justice attempts to prevent human rights abuses. Social justice is based on notions of equality and equal opportunity in society. It focuses on the full and equal participation of all citizens in economic, social, and political aspects of the nation. Social justice can also refer to advantages and disadvantages distributed in a society.” (emphasis added)

Social justice is focused on justice, fair and impartial treatment, equality, and equal opportunity, and preventing abuses based on social injustices.

Principles/Goals of Social Justice

As you continue to understand what social justice means to you, consider the following articulated principles/goals of social justice as presented by GenV and Kent State:

  • Human Rights
  • Access
  • Participation
  • Equity
  • Diversity

Do any of these principles stand out to you? How do you see yourself advancing social justice issues within these categories? How can a law degree and career as an attorney support your goals of social justice through some or all of these lenses?

Lawyers and Social Justice

Based on the definitions and principles listed above, you can see clear themes emerging around how an individual perceives social justice. Understanding what social justice means is important in figuring out how you want to contribute towards social justice causes through your law school and legal careers.

Here are some examples of social justice issues that intersect with the law highlighted by the advocacy organization Pachamama:

  • Voting Laws (i.e. redistricting and voter ID)
  • Policing Laws (i.e. search and seizure and drug scheduling)
  • Environmental Laws (i.e. clean water and air, industrial waste disposal)
  • Health Care Laws (i.e. insurance mandates and coverage eligibility)
  • Education Laws (i.e. public school segregation and integration)
  • Labor Laws (i.e. worker’s rights, occupational health and safety)

The reality is social justice efforts inform almost all aspects of society and the human experience ranging from Climate Justice to Healthcare to Racial Justice to LGBTQIA+ Oppression to Sizeism to Ageism to Hunger and Food Insecurity. You can explore these areas here: 10 Social Justice Issues of 2022. Understanding what the role of law and the legal system is within these causes is important to understanding if a law degree and legal career is right for you.


Social Justice and You

If social justice is a big reason why you want to attend law school and practice law, it will be important that you give the concept some thought; especially if you cite this in your personal statement. Review the definitions listed above and research your own. Use the examples provided to paint a picture in your mind about what being a social justice advocate means to you.

As you develop your goals, be sure to explore the ways in which attorneys work within the universe of social justice causes that are of most interest to you.  Are they helping to create policy?  Do they represent clients, who are these clients?  What type of legal matters or issues require attorney representation? Do you see yourself advocating for these causes through your full-time work or perhaps your pro bono work? How can you weave your passion for social justice into your life?

Law Schools + Social Justice:

Law Schools strive to educate future attorneys who are ready to work on the most pressing legal issues and challenges in our society. As a result, law schools are continually evolving, reflecting on their curriculums and missions to ensure they are offering opportunities to learn in areas most relevant for attorneys today. As legal education continues to evolve and adapt, many law schools have expanded to include curricular offers that specifically offer learning opportunities on social justice topics, including clinics! Be sure to learn about these opportunities at law schools you are interested in.

As you look to the future, continue to refine what social justice means to you and how you could use your skills and experiences to advance a social justice cause, through your legal career, in a way that is meaningful to you.

To help you get started, check out the article “Top Schools Schools for Racial Justice” found in the Fall 2022 Edition of PreLaw Magazine or stop by the PLAS office and pick up a copy of the full magazine.

Alumni Attorney Talks

Alumni Attorney Talks is a virtual series which aims to provide prospective law students with helpful insights about attending law school and pursuing a legal career. This series features interviews with University of Illinois alumni working in a variety of diverse settings within the legal profession.

BONITA B. HWANG CHO

OWNER & PARTNER, LAW OFFICES OF CHENG, CHO & YEE

SPECIALIZING IN IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY LAW

Learn more about the Law Offices of Cheng, Cho & Yee here.

QUICK FACTS ABOUT bonita b. hwang cho
  • Law School: Chicago-Kent College of Law
  • UIUC Undergraduate Major: Business Administration
  • Ms. Cho’s Three Words to Describe an Attorney:

Meaningful | Worthwhile Impactful

CHECK OUT THIS INSIGHTFUL INTERVIEW BELOW! 

October Snapshot

October is officially here and the busy application season is in full swing!  Below is a list of important dates, upcoming events, and reminders for this month. Be sure to check back regularly. The Snapshot is updated weekly with new events and deadlines.

October 1: DEADLINE! Los Angeles Immigration Lawyer Scholarship | For more information, click here.

October 1: DEADLINE! Buckfire & Buckfire P.C. Law School Disability Scholarship | For more information, click here.

October 2: DEADLINE! Last day to apply to become an I STAR Ambassador | For additional information and to apply, click here.

October 3: DEADLINE! Last day to apply for Fulbright scholarship | For additional information and to apply, click here.

October 3: DEADLINE! Campus deadline for Churchill scholarship |For more additional information and to apply, click here.

October 3: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 4:00 pm Wholers Hall. For more information, click here.

October 4: DEADLINE! Last day to apply for the Gilman scholarship | For more information and to apply, click here.

October 4: AccessLex Webinar – Applying to Law School |3:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to register, click here.

October 4: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 4:00 pm Lincoln Hall. For more information, click here.

October 4: The Suite Life on Campus: Managing Healthy Relationships and Conflict | 7:00 pm in 1041 BIF. For more information, click here.

October 5: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 7:00 pm ISR 94AB. For more information, click here.

October 6: In Focus Workshop | 1:00 pm at Psychology Building Room 11. For more information, click here.

October 6: Critical Language Scholarship Information Session | 3:30 pm at 514 IUB. For more information, click here.

October 6: PLAS Workshop – Drafting Your Application | 5:30 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here.

October 7: Perfectionism Series | 1:00 pm in Lincoln Hall 1092. For more information and to register, click here.

October 7: Alumni Talk: The Peace Corps and the State Department: Great Career Moves | 2:00 pm in Coble Hall room 306. For more information, click here.

October 10: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 4:00 pm Wholers Hall. For more information, click here.

October 10: PLAS Workshop – Pre-Law 101 Session One | 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here.

October 11: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 4:00 pm Lincoln Hall. For more information, click here.

October 11: Acing your Interview | 5:00 pm in Career Center Conference Room 143. For more information, click here.

October 12: AccessLex Webinar – Applying to Law School: A Strategic Approach For Underrepresented Students |11:00 am ONLINE. For more information and to register, click here.

October 12: “Paying for Law School” Workshop (in Spanish) from AccessLex | 6:00 pm on Zoom. To register, click here.

October 12: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 7:00 pm ISR 94AB. For more information, click here.

October 13: AccessLex Webinar – Paying for Law School | 1:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to register, click here.

October 13: Goldwater Scholarship Information Session | 3:30 pm in 514 IUB. For more information, click here.

October 13: Creating a Powerful Resume | 5:00 pm Career Center Conference Room 143. For more information, click here.

October 13: “Reporting on Politics and Elections” Panel from The Frank Center for Leadership & Innovation in Media | 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm at Knight Auditorium at Spurlock Museum or join via Zoom. For more information and Zoom registration, click here.

October 14 – 15: October LSAT Best wishes to everyone taking the LSAT this weekend!

October 14: ONLINE Goldwater Scholarship Information Session | 9:00 am on Zoom. For more information, click here.

October 14: Special Event! College of Law Vacketta-DLA Piper Lecture on the Role of Government and the Law featuring Micheal Strautmanis, ’94 | 12:00 pm in the Max L. Rowe Auditorium, Law Building. For more information, click here.

October 14: UHLC Pre-Law Pipeline Program Info Session | 12:00 pm on Zoom | For more information, and to attend, click here.

October 14: Perfectionism Series | 1:00 pm in Lincoln Hall 1092. For more information and to register, click here.

October 14: Goldwater Scholarship Workshop | 3:00 pm at 514 IUB. For more information, click here.

October 14: DEADLINE! Champaign County Public Defender Internship | To apply, click here.

October 14: DEADLINE! Last day to apply for the Castillo Scholars Mentorship Program through Loyola Chicago Law School. For additional information and to apply, click here.

October 15: DEADLINE! Enjuris Scholarship Essay Contest | For more information, click here.

October 15: DEADLINE! Illinois Club Scholarships | For more information, click here.

October 17: PLAS Workshop – Pre-Law 101 Session Two | 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here.

October 17: Creating Your Powerful Cover Letter | 5:00 pm in Career Center Conference Room 143. For more information, click here.

October 17: IU Maurer: Law and Technology: Intellectual Property (including NIL Initiative)| 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here.

October 18: PLAS Workshop – Legal Studies Minor Info Session | 2:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to attend, click here.

October 18: Don’t Stop Believing in Yourself: Learning Self-Compassion | 7:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to attend, click here.

October 19: Graduate and Professional School Fair | 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm at the Illini Union. For more information, click here.

October 19: AccessLex Webinar – Your Law School Investment |4:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to register, click here.

October 19: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 5:00 pm BIF 1041. For more information, click here.

October 19: Finding an Internship | 5:00 pm Career Center Conference Room 143. For more information, click here.

October 20: Dean’s Public Engagement Lecture: Illinois Supreme Court Justice Robert Carter | 12:00 pm in Max L. Rowe Auditorium, Law Building. For more information, click here.

October 20: Boren Scholarship Information Session |3:30 pm at 514 IUB. For more information, click here.

October 20: AccessLex Webinar – Choosing a Law School | 5:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to register, click here.

October 20: IU Maurer: International Law| 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here.

October 21: ONLINE Boren Scholarship Information Session | 9:00 am on Zoom. For more information and to attend, click here.

October 21: Perfectionism Series | 1:00 pm in Lincoln Hall 1092. For more information and to register, click here.

October 21: Boren Scholarship Undergraduate Workshop | 3:00 pm in 514 IUB. For more information, click here.

October 22: October LSAC Digital Law School Forum | 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm ONLINE. For more information and to attend, click here.

October 24: Spring course recommendations out on the blog!

October 24: Spring LSAT Study Groups!  Interested students planning to sit for an upcoming 2023 LSAT exam (January-June) are invited to sign-up for a peer study group!  Click here for additional details and to sign-up!  Sign-ups end November 13.

October 24: IU Maurer: Name, Image Likeness Initiative | 6:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here.

October 25: A Fireside Chat with Illinois Supreme Court Justice Lisa Holder White | 12:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to attend, click here.

October 25: Test Anxiety Program | 1:00 pm Lincoln Hall 1027. For more information, click here.

October 25: Mental Health Fair | 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm in Illini Union. For more information, click here.

October 25: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information, click here.

October 25: Mirror, Mirror on the Wall: Addressing Body Image | 7:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to attend, click here.

October 26: Business Majors Only: Pre-Law Advising Information Session at the GIES Undergraduate Success Lab | 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm In Person – Business Instructional Facility 1401. For more information and to register, click here.

October 26: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 5:00 pm BIF 1041. For more information, click here.

October 27: DEADLINE! Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans | For more information, click here.

October 27: Beinecke Scholarship Information Session | 3:30 pm in 514 IUB. For more information, click here.

October 27: Recognition, Insight, and Openness (RIO) series“Feeling Overwhelmed and Looking to Get ‘Unstuck?'” | 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information, click here.

October 27: IU Maurer: Family Office Program| 5:00 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here.

October 27: Roosevelt University Paralegal Studies Program Information Session | 6 pm ONLINE. For more information, click here.

October 27: Atlanta’s John Marshall Virtual Open House | 6 pm on Zoom. For more information and to register, click here.

October 27: The World of Patent Law: A Panel Presentation | 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm Online. Sponsors: Council on Intellectual Property, NYC Bar Association and the Office of Preprofessional Advising, Berick Center for Student Advising, Columbia University. To learn more and register, click here.

October 27: APPtitude certificate program Information Session | 12:00 pm via Zoom. Pre-registration is not required, click here for additional information.  For students with anticipated graduation dates of December 2024, May 2025, or August 2025. 

October 28: Application for TRIALS 2023, hosted by NYU School of Law opens | for more details, click here.

October 28: APPtitude certificate program Information Session (ENCORE) | 10:00 am via Zoom. Pre-registration is not required, click here for additional information. For students with anticipated graduation dates of December 2024, May 2025, or August 2025. 

October 28: ONLINE Beinecke Scholarship Information Session | 9:00 am on Zoom. For more information and to attend, click here.

October 28: AccessLex Webinar – Building Your Law School Budget | 11:00 am ONLINE. For more information and to register, click here.

October 28: Beinecke Scholarship Workshop | 3:00 pm in 514 IUB. For more information, click here.

October 29: Sophomore Super Saturdays | Hosted by CLEO and co-hosted by the University of Illinois Chicago School of Law and DePaul University College of Law. For more information and to register, click here.

October 29: Road to Law School | Hosted by CLEO and co-hosted by the University of Illinois Chicago School of Law and DePaul University College of Law. For more information and to register, click here.

October 29: Juniors Jumpstart the LSAT | Hosted by CLEO and co-hosted by the University of Illinois Chicago School of Law and DePaul University College of Law. For more information and to register, click here.

October 31: DEADLINE! Good Works Scholarship | For more information. click here.

October 31: Acing Your Interview | 5:00 pm in Career Center Conference Room 143. For more information, click here.

October 31: Internship with the Office of Congressman Sean Casten in Washington D.C. and Glen Ellyn, IL | Applications are due November 11, 2022. For more information and to apply, click here

October 31: UChicago Law Admissions On-Campus Visit | 12:15 pm – 4:00 pm – To learn more, click here.

September Snapshot

September 1: Application Deadline! Applications for the Pre-Law Advisory Council are due today! For more information and to apply, please click here.

September 1: DEADLINE! Last day to register for the October LSAT – please visit LSAC for more information.

September 1: Gilman Scholarship Information Session | 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm at 1065 Lincoln Hall. For more information, click here.

September 1: We CU Community-Engaged Scholars Information Session | 4pm on Zoom. To register, click here.

September 2: ONLINE Gilman Scholarship Information Session | 9:00 am – 10:00 am via Zoom. For more information, click here.

September 2: Gilman Scholarship Workshop Session | 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm at 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building. For more information, click here.

September 6: Career Preparation Workshop at the Career Center715 S. Wright Street from 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm. For additional information about this opportunity, click here.

September 6: Luce Scholarship Priority Deadline – For more information on this scholarship opportunity, click here.

September 7: Political Science & Economics Fall Kickoff | David Kinley Hall South Lawn, 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm. For more information, please contact the Economics or Political Science departments.

September 7: IU Maurer School of Law Admissions Info Session | Virtual | 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm CT. For more information and to register, click here.

September 7: Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP) Informational Meeting | Virtual |3:00pm – 4:00pm. Click here for more information and for the Zoom link.

September 8: Gates Scholarship Priority Deadline – For more information about this scholarship opportunity, click here.

September 9: Application Deadline! 2022-2023 Provost’s Undergraduate Student Advisory Board. For additional information about this opportunity, click here.

September 9: Churchill Scholarship Information Session | 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm at 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building. For more information, click here.

September 9: UHLC Pre-Law Pipeline Program Info Session | Virtual | 12:00pm CST. Click here to attend the session.

September 9 – 10: September LSAT Best wishes to everyone taking the LSAT this weekend!

September 12: Knight Hennessy Scholarship Priority Deadline – For more information about this scholarship opportunity, click here.

September 12: PLAS Workshop – Drafting Your Application at 4:00 pm. To learn more and register, click here.

September 12: Marquette Law Diversity Information Session | 3:30pm – 4:30pm in Eckstein Hall. To learn more and register, click here.

September 12: Application Deadline! Peer Advocate Program. For more information click here.

September 13: FREE LSAT Workshop | 6:00pm – 7:30pm. To register, click here.

September 13: Career Preparation Workshop at the Career Center715 S. Wright Street from 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm. For additional information about this opportunity, click here.

September 13: Reproductive Justice Collaborative Panel Discussion |4:00pm – 5:30pm at 300 Levis Faculty Center, 919 W. Illinois, Champaign. For more information, click here.

September 14: PLAS Workshop – Pre-Law 101| Session One at 5:00 pm. To learn more and register, click here.

September 15: Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP) Informational Meeting | 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm at 123 David Kinley Hall.

September 16: Apply for Illinois Club Scholarships! | Applications are due by October 15th. For more information click here.

September 16: Constitution Day 2022: Interpreting the Constitution | 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm at the Max L. Rowe Auditorium, Illinois College of Law. Also available to view via Livestream. For more information, click here.

September 16: Conversation Café & Friday Forum |12:00pm – 1:00pm at University YMCA. For more information, click here.

September 18: DEADLINE! Last day to sign up to volunteer at the 2022 Law School Fair – Sign up to volunteer at the Law School Fair! Various shifts are available. To sign up, click here.

September 20: Schwarzman Scholarship Deadline for US/Global Applicants | For more information about this scholarship opportunity, click here.

September 21: PLAS Workshop – Pre-Law 101| Session Two at 5:00 pm. To learn more and register, click here.

September 22: IU Maurer School of Law Admissions Info Session | In-Person|12:00 pm – 2:00 pm CT. For more information and to register, click here.

September 23: Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program (URAP) Informational Meeting | 3:00 – 4:00 pm at 1002 Lincoln Hall.

September 24: Chicago LSAC Law School Forum | 10:00 am to 5:00 pm at the Palmer House Hilton in Chicago. To learn more, click here.

September 28: LAW SCHOOL FAIR – Illini Union – 10:00 am to 2:00 pm. To learn more click here. No pre-registration is required. Free and open to all!

September 29: DEADLINE! Last day to register for the November LSAT– please visit LSAC for more information.

September 29: Truman Scholarship Information Session | 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm at 514 Illini Union Bookstore. For more information, click here.

September 30: ONLINE Truman Scholarship Information Session | 9:00 am – 10:00 am via Zoom. For more information, click here

September 30: Truman Scholarship Workshop Session | 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm at 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building. For more information, click here.

September 30: DEADLINE! Last day to apply for the Internship with Office of University Counsel | For more information, click here.