Privilege Doesn’t Have to Stay Taboo

Privilege Doesn’t Have to Stay Taboo

      I chose these 6 words based on the amount of ignorance I see from very privileged people. I believe that the reason these people deny their ignorance and genuinely think they’re not saying anything wrong is because their privilege is not talked about. In order to be more accepting, try to understand others’ experiences, and be more open-minded, we need to discuss about our own privilege so we can move closer to learning about people different than us. I have witnessed this subtle ignorance in my own rhetoric classroom. While we were watching “In Whose Honor”, I noticed one of my classmates laughing at the Native American woman crying while explaining how she’s been affected by Chief Illiniwek, misunderstanding why she would be so upset over something that seemed so insignificant in the long run. Watching someone discard another experience just because they were not affected directly shows the privilege, and its lack of acknowledgment. If we talked more about social identities and our differences, especially around race, we would feel much more open, accepting, and passionate about learning how our differences make the world so interesting and special.

After reading “The Invisible Knapsack”, I realized how privilege does affect my everyday life. I can go about my normal day without having to acknowledge or be questioned because of my race. I don’t have to worry about being discriminated against or think about how others may view my actions just based on the color of my skin. This article reminds me so much of my EOL 199 class, which is highly based around social justice and identities. We learn that talking about race and listening about others’ experiences help privileged people have a better idea of what people of non-dominant identities go through on a daily basis.