Why is building good credit important?

Building good credit is important especially if you want to finance any large purchases like your home, car, education, etc. Maintaining good credit will show creditors or lenders, whom you are borrowing money from, that you are responsible and have the ability to pay back the money that you borrow in a timely fashion. Creditors use your credit history to determine how much interest that you would have to pay on a loan. If you are considered to have good credit, you are more likely to get a lower interest rate because you are of less risk of not being able to pay back the money that you owe.

Some employers also check your credit score before hiring. An employer that is checking for credit scores during the hiring process might be looking for someone that is responsible and reliable. If you are not responsible and reliable with your money, how would you fare in a workplace where your coworkers and company will rely on you.

Maintaining good credit will show that you are financially responsible and on the right track. The economy runs on credit and if you need to borrow money, you must maintain a good credit history.

Written by: Tony Li, Financial Wellness Peer Educator, University of Illinois Extension, 2018.

Reviewed by Kathy Sweedler, Consumer Economics Educator, University of Illinois Extension.

What happens to the interest on my federal loans while I’m in school?

All federal student loans have a variable or fixed interest rate that is set by Congress. The interest rate will vary depending on the type of loan you borrow and when the loan disburses. In most cases, if you have borrowed a loan since 2007, your loan will have a fixed interest rate. This means the interest rate will remain the same for the life of the loan or until it is completely repaid.

The amount of interest that accrues (accumulates) on your loan from month to month is determined by a simple daily interest formula. This formula consists of multiplying your loan balance by the number of days since the last payment times the interest rate factor. The interest rate factor is determined by dividing your loan’s interest rate by the number of days in the year. (Federal Student Aid)

Simple daily interest formula:

Outstanding principal balance
X number of days since last payment
X interest rate factor
= interest amount

Interest will accrue while you are enrolled in school. However, if you have a Federal Direct Subsidized Loan, the government will pay the interest that accrues while you are in school as long as you are enrolled at least half-time.

If you borrow a Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan or Federal Direct Grad PLUS Loan you will be responsible for paying the interest that accrues while you are enrolled in school. Students enrolled half-time or more do have the right to receive an in-school deferment from their loan servicer. Students are still responsible for repaying the interest that accrues, but the payments are not due during the deferment period. Interest that accrues during a student’s deferment will capitalize (be added to principal amount borrowed). Capitalization occurs at the time you enter repayment and results in a higher amount to be repaid.

Written by Josh Keen, Office of Student Financial Aid

Staying on Good Terms: Credit & Debt (Recorded Webinar)

According to a 2012 Sallie Mae report, “How America Pays,” 35% of students borrowed education loans to pay for college and, although credit card ownership has decreased recently, 35% of undergraduates have a credit card. Credit is an important financial tool that students need to learn how to manage wisely. Learn how credit card debt can affect you now as well as in the future through this webinar.

University of Illinois Extension, along with the University of Illinois’ Student Money Management Center, hosted the webinar “Staying on Good Terms: Credit & Debt” on October 21, 2014. The FREE webinar focused on understanding credit, comparing costs of credit, and managing debt effectively. Watch it below!

Borrowing badgeThis is a Borrowing Badge eligible program, so make sure to take the quiz after watching to get credit!

“Staying on Good Terms: Credit & Debt” is part of the Get $avvy: Grow Your Green Stuff webinar series.

 

Written by Andrea Pellegrini, University of Illinois USFSCO Student Money Management Center

What information should I consider before borrowing a student loan?

Student loans are a common and convenient source of funding used by more than half of the students at the University of Illinois to help pay for their education. Many students do need to borrow and consider this a wise investment in their future. Before borrowing a student loan, consider this important information:

  • Borrow only what you need and can reasonably repay.
  • Develop a realistic budget and consider ways to lower your costs.
  • Research the average pay of your chosen field to know if your projected earnings will be enough to repay your student loans.
  • Keep track of your loan debt (principal and any accrued interest) so you will know the amount you will have to repay.
  • Know that repaying your student loan on time can help establish and maintain an excellent credit history.
  • Be aware that student loans are in your name and affect your credit history, so you should know and understand the obligations.
  • Unlike other forms of consumer debt, student loans cannot be discharged through bankruptcy except under extraordinary circumstances.
  • If you fail to make a payment on your student loan for an extended period, your loans may be placed into default.
  • A default on a federal student loan will require payment of additional costs, including collection costs, attorney’s fees, court costs, and additional interest. These costs may substantially increase the amount owed on your student loan.
  • No statutes of limitation apply to the collection of federal student loan debt. This means that your student loan debt may be collected many years, or decades, into the future.
  • The IRS may seize your tax refunds to repay a defaulted federal student loan.
  • Your future wages may be garnished to repay a defaulted federal student loan.
  • Your Social Security benefits may be garnished to repay a defaulted federal student loan.
  • Any disability benefits you receive may be garnished to repay a defaulted federal student loan.
  • A default on a federal student loan may result in the denial or revocation of a professional license, such as a license to practice medicine or law.

Written by Josh Keen, Office of Student Financial Aid

Is there a limit to how much I can borrow in subsidized or unsubsidized loans?

Undergraduate and graduate students that borrow Federal Direct Student Loans (subsidized and/or unsubsidized) need to be aware there are maximum allowable loan limits. There is an annual maximum loan limit which restricts the total amount a student can borrow for an academic year (fall, spring, and summer). Also, there are aggregate maximum loan limits which restrict the amount a student can borrow over their college career.

Maximum Loan LimitsWritten by Josh Keen, Office of Student Financial Aid