Why Are Conspiracy Theories So Compelling?

In my last post, I described the first phase of my research, in which I am attempting to develop an empirically informed definition of ‘conspiracy theory’. In this post, I want to discuss the second focus of my research: why it is that conspiracy theories are so compelling for so many people. Although the specifics […]

Announcing Topic Modeling – Theory & Practice Workshops

We’re happy to announce that Scholarly Commons intern Matt Pitchford is teaching a series of two Savvy Researcher Workshops on Topic Modeling. You may be following Matt’s posts on Studying Rhetorical Responses to Terrorism on Twitter or Preparing Your Data for Topic Modeling on Commons Knowledge, and now is your chance to learn the basics […]

What is a Conspiracy Theory?

Part of my internship at the Scholarly Commons will be a series of blog posts to describe my research and the different tools that I’ll be using to pursue it. In this first post, I’ll begin to give an account of my overall research project. Future posts will deal with other parts of the research […]

Topic Modeling and the Future of Ebooks

This semester I’ve had the pleasure of taking a course on Issues in Scholarly Communication with Dr. Maria Bonn at the University of Illinois iSchool. While we’ve touched on a number of fascinating issues in this course, I’ve been particularly interested in JSTOR Labs’ Reimagining the Monograph Project. This project was inspired by the observation […]