TiddlyWiki Review

Here at Commons Knowledge we like to talk about all of the various options out there for personal and information management tools, so today we’re talking about TiddlyWiki! “It’s like a hypertext card index system from the future” -Jeremy Ruston, in the TiddlyWiki intro video To summarize: this is a British, somewhat tricky to use, free […]

Writing the next great American novel, or realistically, finding the “write” tools to finish your thesis

The Scholarly Commons is a great place to write the next great American novel; in fact, I’m surprised it has not happened yet (no pressure dear patrons — we understand that you have a lot on your plates). We’re open Monday-Friday from 9-6 and enjoy a well-lit, fairly quiet, and overall ideal working space, with […]

Use Sifter for Twitter Research

For many academics, Twitter is an increasingly important source. Whether you love it or hate it, Twitter dominates information dissemination and discourse, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. However, actually sorting through Twitter — especially for large-scale projects — can be deceptively difficult, and a deterrent for would-be Twitter scholars. That is […]

Topic Modeling and the Future of Ebooks

This semester I’ve had the pleasure of taking a course on Issues in Scholarly Communication with Dr. Maria Bonn at the University of Illinois iSchool. While we’ve touched on a number of fascinating issues in this course, I’ve been particularly interested in JSTOR Labs’ Reimagining the Monograph Project. This project was inspired by the observation […]

Meet Eleanor Dickson, the Visiting HathiTrust Digital Humanities Specialist

This latest installment in our series of interviews with Scholarly Commons experts and affiliates features Eleanor Dickson, the Visiting HathiTrust Research Center Digital Humanities Specialist. What is your background education and work experience? What led you to this field? I have a B.A. in English and History with a minor in Italian studies. As an […]

HackCulture: A Hackathon for the Humanities, Spring 2017

We live in a data-filled world. Over 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created every day—everything from election polls to Pokémon Go collects and uses big data—and the number of data collecting services around the world only grows. Working with and understanding data is a valuable skill for many students and scholars, from art historians […]

Scholarly Smackdown: StoryMap JS vs. Story Maps

In today’s very spatial Scholarly Smackdown post we are covering two popular mapping visualization products, Story Maps and StoryMap JS.Yes they both have “story” and “map” in the name and they both let you create interactive multimedia maps without needing a server. However, they are different products! StoryMap JS StoryMap JS, from the Knight Lab […]

Text Analysis Basics – See Your Words in Voyant!

Interested in doing basic text analysis but have no or limited programming experience? Do you feel intimidated by the command line? One way to get started with text analysis, visualization, and uncovering patterns in large amounts of text is with browser-based programs! And today we have a mega blockbuster blog post extravaganza about Voyant Tools! […]

Review: The Infographic History of the World by Valentina D’Efilippo and James Ball

The Infographic History of the World, created by Valentina D’Efilippo and James Ball, consists of various infographics with accompanying commentaries. You can find this book and read it at Scholarly Commons, near our other infographic and visualization books! You can also check it out from a nearby library! Overall, this book is a compelling read […]

Review: Paperpile Citation Manager

Are you addicted to Google Docs and are looking for a citation manager, PDF reader, or research workflow system? Do you wish you could just cite while you write in Google docs like you do with Zotero or Mendeley in Word? Do you have an extra $36 a year to spare? Then you might want […]