Random Facts: Copyright Edition

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. Just in case “Copyright” is one of the categories when you finally make it on Jeopardy! Facts aren’t copyrightable Generally, unless there is some creativity in the expression associated with them, facts aren’t copyrightable. Even if you were the first person […]

Open Access and… Animals?

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. The modern research landscape is an asset for biologists, zoologists, conservationists, etc. They can track animals, check up on them, figure out what is helping or harming their environment, and report or adjust accordingly. They tag animals and create twitter handles […]

Public Domain and Creativity

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication & Publishing Graduate Assistant Nicole Moriah Rhodes. The first American copyright law protected works for fourteen years after they were published and gave the copyright owner the opportunity to renew the copyright for another fourteen years. Few did, and works passed quickly into the public domain. The […]

Copyright as a Tool for Censorship

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication & Publishing Graduate Assistant Nicole Moriah Rhodes. Copyright should be used to encourage speech and not to silence it. The stories below demonstrate that copyright can be used to limit the rights of technology users and censor criticism. First, an introduction to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act […]

Closed Doors or Open Access?: Envisioning the Future of the United States Copyright Office

It’s Copyright Week! For today’s theme of “transparency”, Copyright Librarian Sara Benson discusses her thoughts on the Copyright Office activities to review Section 108. In 2005, the Copyright Office, under the guidance of the Register of Copyrights at the time, Mary Beth Peters, called for a Study Group to convene and review possible amendments to […]

(Baseball) Bibliometrics: The Final Inning

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. This is the third part of a three-part series. Read Part 1 and Part 2. We’re almost there! We’ve just got to go over some of the newest ways of measuring impact, and then we can all go home with that […]

(Baseball) Bibliometrics: Calculating the Scoreboard

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. This is the second part of a three-part series. Read Part 1 here. In our last post, we discussed what makes a journal the best team for a scholarly player (sort of). Today, we are looking at scores that are used to […]

(Baseball) Bibliometrics Broken Down: A Series

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. This is the first part of a three-part series. No matter what game, everyone wants to be the best. Play for the best team, have the highest score, whatever. The game of research is no different. Now, I don’t mean to […]

Open Access Button v. Unpaywall: Is there a Winner?

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. A few months back, the Commons Knowledge blog featured a post about a new feature from Impactstory called “Unpaywall.” Read that article here. This is still a relatively new tool that aims to find open access versions of articles if they […]

Where Does Sci-Hub Fit In?

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. Open access is not as simple as it may seem. In addition to conflicting definitions of open access itself, there are many different kinds, which may or may not follow the definitions previously put forth. There are three basic types that […]