Understanding Creative Commons Licenses

It doesn’t matter if you’re a student, a scholar, or just someone with a blog: we all run into issues finding images that you’re allowed to use on your website, in your research, or in an advertisement. While copyright laws have avenues for use, it’s not guaranteed that you can use the image you want, and […]

Using an Art Museum’s Open Data

*Edits on original idea and original piece by C. Berman by Billy Tringali As a former art history student, I’m incredibly interested in the how the study of art history can be aided by the digital humanities. More and more museums have started allowing the public to access a portion of their data. When it […]

Edward Ayers: Twenty-Five Years in Digital History and Counting

We are so excited to be hosting a talk by Edward Ayers next week! We hope you’ll join us on March 29, 2018 from 4-6 PM in 220 Main Library. Edward Ayers has been named National Professor of the Year, received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama at the White House, won the Bancroft Prize and Beveridge […]

Random Facts: Copyright Edition

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. Just in case “Copyright” is one of the categories when you finally make it on Jeopardy! Facts aren’t copyrightable Generally, unless there is some creativity in the expression associated with them, facts aren’t copyrightable. Even if you were the first person […]

Open Access and… Animals?

This post was guest authored by Scholarly Communication and Publishing Graduate Assistant Paige Kuester. The modern research landscape is an asset for biologists, zoologists, conservationists, etc. They can track animals, check up on them, figure out what is helping or harming their environment, and report or adjust accordingly. They tag animals and create twitter handles […]

Introducing the Scholarly Commons Project Forum

The Scholarly Commons Project Forum is an hour-long bi-weekly meeting space for scholars who are interested in Digital Humanities questions regarding data and text. These meetings are an opportunity for informal, open-ended conversations about research where we will discuss conceptual, methodological, and workflow issues for projects. Those projects may be at any stage of development, […]

Endangered Data Week is Coming

Did you know that Endangered Data Week is happening from February 26-March 2? Endangered Data Week is a collaborative effort to help highlight on public datasets that are in danger of being deleted, repressed, mishandled, or lost. Inspired by recent events that have shown how fragile publicly administered data is, Endangered Data Week hopes to […]

Celebrating Frederick Douglass with Crowdsourced Transcriptions

On February 14, 2018, the world celebrated Frederick Douglass’ 200th birthday. Douglass, the famed Black social reformer, abolitionist, writer and statesman, did not know the date of his birth, and chose the date of Februar   y 14, 1818 to celebrate his birthday. This year, to celebrate the 200th anniversary of his birth, Colored Conventions, […]

New Scholarly Commons Space Coming

If you haven’t heard, the Scholarly Commons is in the process of creating a new, collaborative space with construction beginning in 2019. We have a few mock ups of the space as it is currently imagined, and would love for our patrons to tells us how they feel about them! Below are the mock ups, […]