Spotlight: Postach.io Blogging Platform

Many people use Evernote to keep their research (and life) organized. This notebook-based note-taking platform has grown in popularity so much, that the creators of Evernote created Postach.io, a blogging platform that connects with Evernote, and uses Evernote notes as the content of blog posts. Basically, you can take the notes you’ve created in Evernote and directly publish them for anyone to see!

If you’re someone who is already familiar with, and using Evernote, Postach.io may be a great, free platform for you to get your research out there. While it doesn’t have the same kind of customization options that you can have on WordPress or Tumblr, nor the built-in audiences of those sites, its simplified style and integration with Evernote makes it a useful tool, especially since Postach.io is free, and only requires that you have/create an Evernote account.

To start, you must link up your Evernote account with Postach.io. After submitting your contact information, the site will automatically transfer you to Evernote.

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The first step to creating a Postach.io site is to give your name, email address, and password.
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The Evernote page that Postach.io links you to.

Evernote will then ask whether you’d like to create a new notebook for your Postach.io site, or link to a notebook already in use. Note that linking to an already-created notebook does not automatically make your notes public. Each note on the site must have a ‘published’ tag attached to it to in order to be public. I’ll have more on that in a little bit.

You can also choose the length of time Postach.io will have access to your notebook. Lengths range from a minimum of one day to a maximum of one year. After that period, Postach.io will either lose access to that notebook, or you will have to reauthorize it.

After you authorize your account, you will have the opportunity to create an Evernote note that will serve as your initial Postach.io post. The most important part of this process is tagging the post as “Published.” A note that lacks this tag will not be put on your Postach.io site, even if it’s in your authorized notebook.

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Me adding my “published” tag to ensure that my post is added to my Postach.io site.

Once you finish and tag your post, your Postach.io account is officially up and running.

As far as the site itself, your options are somewhat limited. This is what your site will look like immediately after you publish your first post:

A very generic theme.
A very generic theme.

You do have the option to change your avatar and background image, as well as choose from a little over a dozen themes to work with. These themes, however, are all incredibly basic, with few customization options outside of the basic appearance. In order to access the source code for your site or to create a custom theme, you will need to upgrade your account to a paid account.

A paid account will let you access that source code, as stated above, as well as create multiple sites. With a free account, you can only have one site at a time. $5/month gets you five sites, $15/month will get you twenty sites, and $25/month will give you fifty. If you pay for an entire year in advance, you’ll get two months out of the year free. In my opinion, you’re better off using a free platform like Tumblr or WordPress and transferring your Evernote data than opting for a paid account.

Overall, Postach.io is a simple way to get work that you’ve already started in Evernote published and readable by the world.

Do you think you’ll use Postach.io? What blogging platforms do you use? Let us know in the comments, or Tweet us at @scholcommons!

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