Spotlight on DiRT Directory: Digital Research Tools

The DiRT logo.

As a researcher, it can sometimes be frustrating knowing¬†that someone out there has created a useful tool that will help you with what you’re working on, but being unable to find it. Google searches prove fruitless, and your network of friends don’t necessarily know what you’re talking about. In that moment of panic and frustration, you may just need to get a little DiRT-y.

DiRT Directory: Digital Research Tools is a directory of research tools for scholarly use. Using TaDiRAH (the Taxonomy of Digital Research Activities in the Humanities), DiRT breaks down the stages of a research project, and groups tools that are relevant to each stage: Capture, Creation, Enrichment, Analysis, Interpretation, Storage, and Dissemination. Users can either search for tools using these categories — broken down into subcategories whose specificity helps to narrow down the many tools found in the DiRT Directory — through a search box or by tag. Personally, I feel that searching through the TaDiRAH categories allows you to find relevant tools, but also allows you to explore options that you may not have previously thought of as being available, making it the most fruitful way to browse tools.

One nice aspect of DiRT is its search platform. After you choose your category, you have the option to search within the category for these criteria: Platform, Cost, Exclude, License, and Research Objects, as well as sort order. For researchers concerned with cost, this tool is especially useful, as you can limit your search to what is in your budget.

After you complete your search, you are offered a list of different tools. Tools range from well-known sources, like Google Docs, to things you have probably never heard of before. Each source includes a description, outlining what kind of tool it is — online, software, etc. — what its capabilities are, and in many cases, a note on its past or future development. Each entry also includes a link to the tool’s website, their license, and the date of DiRT’s most recent update on the source information.

An example tool entry on DiRT for Scrivener writing software.

An example tool entry on DiRT for Scrivener writing software on the search page.

Finally, each tool has its own page that you can access from the search function. This page holds a wealth of information, including an expanded description that outlines the nitty gritty aspects of the tool — from platforms to cost bracket to tags. It also includes screenshots of the tool in action, a list of recent edits to the page, and a comments section. However, not all tools have the same level of detail in their pages.

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Scrivener’s page, which includes a description, screenshots, a list of contributors, and a comments section.

While the selection presented on DiRT can be almost overwhelming, digging through DiRT can help you find the perfect tools for your project.

If you still can’t find what you want in DiRT Directory, or need some guidance in what to search for in the first place, stop by the Scholarly Commons, located in Main Library Room 306, open from 9am-6pm on weekdays. Or, email us! We are always happy to help you with your research needs.

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