WMC Wish List

One of the ways you can aid the Wildlife Medical Clinic is to donate some of the items used everyday for the treatment and care of the patients. The clinic is run solely by donations and fundraisers, so help from the community is crucial. For a list of items on our wish list, click here. Donations can be dropped off at the Small Animal Clinic during normal business hours. The patients and the students greatly appreciate your contribution.

 

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WMC Student Volunteers Rescue Hawk Found on Campus

URBANA — There’s a hawk on the University of Illinois campus, but he’s not there to play hockey. It’s actually a young red-tailed hawk. A University of Illinois officer found it on Tuesday night. Police say it was on the road by the power station on Oak Street. And investigators say it didn’t fly away when they got closer. Workers at the university’s wildlife clinic say that kind of behavior is usually a good clue something’s wrong.

“If they see people, they’ll want to fly away and not want to be around them, but since this guy was feeling so down and out, he was letting people come close to him because he didn’t have the energy to fly away and protect himself like a normal hawk would,” said Kelly Rockwell, who is the Wildlife Medical Clinic co-manager.

Workers say the bird was dehydrated and hadn’t been eating much either. They put an IV in one of his legs so he can get fluids. They say he’s in stable condition and say he should get better. Police say this is the first time they can remember seeing a hawk stranded on campus.

For the full story and news coverage, Click Here

 

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Wine for Wildlife Fundraiser 5/30, 12-4PM

Join us at SunSinger Wine and Spirits for a special event next weekend!

Sun Singer will partner with Duckhorn Wine Company to host a Ducktails wine tasting fundraiser for the Wildlife Medical Clinic at Illinois, which accepts ill, injured or orphaned native wild animals, with the exception of skunks and bats, twenty-four hours per day, seven days per week.

Animal lovers and wine lovers alike can spend the afternoon sampling wines for a great cause! The event will feature a silent auction with art prints, special Duckhorn wines and a Sun Singer gift basket. The Wildlife Medical Clinic will showcase their resident birds.

Join us for an afternoon with Paula Widmaier of Duckhorn Wine Company. Paula, the company’s Midwest District Sales Manager, will be on site pouring samples of several wines from the Duckhorn portfolio, including the new Duckhorn Chardonnay, and answering any questions you may have.

Sun Singer will be donating 10% from the sales of the wines sampled!

See you there! For more information, see the Facebook Event

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Nokomis: Remembering a Local Legend

by Zach Kline, VM2015

Last Saturday the Wildlife Medical Clinic held a ceremonial “release” for the ashes of the Resident birds who had passed away in recent years. I was upset when obligations regarding my clinical rotation prevented me from returning in time for the ceremony, so I wanted to make sure I paid my respects to one of those birds who made a big impact in my life while I was working for the WMC.

An incredible animal who was truly one in a million, Nokomis’s tame personality and inability to interact normally with other Great-Horned owls made him the perfect ambassador for his species and wild birds as a whole. Gentle, calm, and curious, Nokomis handily endured educational talks in front of large groups of people for almost thirteen years with the WMC. Over that time he (along with the other resident birds) touched the lives of thousands of adults and children in Central Illinois and was certainly considered the face of the Wildlife Medical Clinic.

I spent hundreds of hours working alone during late nights, holidays, breaks, and summers during my time as WMC manager. Occasionally those days could get rather lonely or frustrating, and Nokomis’s presence was always enough to cheer me up! As evidenced by the following photos, the two of us were bent on walking the path to stardom by means of various photo shoots, newscasts, and Public Relations talks. Though he was still a wild animal who was probably just tolerating my presence, every opportunity I got to have him on glove was beyond cool. I will certainly miss our time together.

During long days between patient treatments, I would have the “big boys” out to wander about the treatment room. Nokomis and Odin spent many collective hours exploring every nook and cranny the clinic had to offer.

Here, Nokomis is seen atop his very favorite perch.

I always likened Nokomis’s behavior to that of a very curious cat. Seen in front of him is a bin full of owl pellets that the clinic would sell to elementary schools. The tupperware on top was placed to dissuade that doofy owl from his habit of eating and/or knocking the pellets off of the refrigerator.

 

An intimidating visage, but a genuinely benign bird. Typically, Great-Horned Owl behavior is characterized by extreme threat displays and unbridled aggression. As a human, I feel fortunate that the only angry part of THIS owl is his face.

Photo shoot for the Veterinary Medicine Website. Nokomis spent 90% of this shoot being distracted by things going on behind him, so I’m surprised we got ANY of him facing the camera.

Nokomis was greatly admired by veterinary students throughout the school, as news of his passing clearly affected WMC members and non-members alike. While still upsetting to think about, I hope that these photos convey the respect I feel for this animal for all that his presence has done for the WMC and Wildlife Conservation in General.

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Wildlife Baby Shower Featured on WCIA Local News

To view the news clip, Click Here

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS — Spring means time for more newborn wild animals. That means people will bring them to the UI’s Wildlife Medical Clinic if they think they’re orphans, like these baby squirrels. Workers will treat the animals but say sometimes they don’t always need our help.

There’s a chance they weren’t even abandoned. To learn more, the clinic is holding a Wildlife Baby Shower. They’ll explain what to do when you find an orphaned animal. The workshop is free and open to the public.

Wildlife Baby Shower
Prairieland Feeds, Savoy
Saturday, April 4
11 am & 1 pm
Free workshop

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Great Horned Owl Release 3/18/15

A great horned owl was released yesterday after WMC volunteers treated a corneal ulcer in his left eye. Raptors rely on sight and sound to hunt, making vision in both eyes extremely important. Thankfully this owl made a full recovery and was able to take flight once again! See the release video below:

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