The Undergraduate Library Announces the UGL 50th Anniversary Design Competition!

The Undergraduate Library 50th anniversary flyer for the Graphic Design Competition. Create the official UGL @50 design! 1st place receives 100 dollars. 2nd place receives 50 dollars. 3rd place receives 25 dollars. Submission deadline is April 10, 2019. Text is on a yellowish orange block on a white background.

The UGL@50 Design Contest!

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Undergraduate Library at the University of Illinois! As we prepare to turn as golden as the corn in the Morrow Plots, we’re eagerly planning for an awesome celebration in Fall of 2019.  No UGL celebration would be complete without incorporating student creative voices, though, so we’re launching a special competition for aspiring graphic designers.  The UGL is inviting submissions for a commemorative graphic design which represents the look and theme for the UGL@50 celebration, and encapsulates the many roles the library serves in students’ lives.

Prizes will be awarded to the designers of the top three designs. The first-place design will become an enduring part of the UGL’s digital identity and it will be printed on multiple forms of commemorative items including t-shirts, mugs, and other swag! In addition, the first-place logo designer will receive $100, free UGL swag with their design printed on it, and a special invitation to the 50th anniversary celebration taking place in Fall 2019. The second and third-place designs will receive $50 and $25 prizes.

All submissions should reflect a relevant representation of the University of Illinois undergraduate student body, and should embody what the UGL experience means to you and your classmates. The design should celebrate elements from the past, present, and/or future of the UGL, should there be a future UGL. Designers should ask themselves how the UGL has affected their student experience and provide a design representative of their personal association with the library. Most of all, we want you to celebrate the longstanding of our underground gem!

Here are the contest guidelines:

  • The deadline for all submissions is April 10, 2019. Winners will be notified by April 20th.
  • Only current undergraduate students are eligible to compete.
  • Any design shape is permitted, but should scale easily for a variety of formats – including print, digital, and physical items like t-shirt and coffee cups.
  • Designers wishing to incorporate the official University of Illinois colors or ‘Block I’ into their design should refer to the University of Illinois brand guidelines.
  • Only one submission permitted per artist.
  • All entries must be submitted as PDF, PNG, TIFF, or JPEG images with high resolution. Designers are highly encouraged to save the original format.
  • Submitting your artwork will provide the UGL with the right to use your work in promotional materials. You will receive credit and ownership as the content creator. For full contest and ownership details, see the content submission form.
  • Read the full list of contest rules.

Need help getting started? Check out the following resources for some information and inspiration!

Please contact undergrad@library.illinois.edu with any questions.

Written by Annabel

Edited by Zander

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Illinois students’ artwork brings creative flair to the UGL’s Student Art Gallery

The first display case of The Undergraduate Library Student Art Gallery with the current set of artwork.

The Student Art Gallery’s first display case

For the past couple of months, artwork created by a handful of Illinois’ creative undergraduate students have filled the UGL’s Student Art Gallery after a call for student submissions during the Fall semester. The artistic works, ranging from collages to photography and paintings, have drawn the eyes of thousands of students, faculty and staff, community members, and all who visit the UGL.

Undergraduate Library graduate assistant, Stephen, was able to ask the artists a few questions about what inspired their featured work, their creativity in general, where we can see more of their work, and more.

Stephen: What was the inspiration behind your featured art? What inspires your art in general?

Yi Zhuang: Life is hard in college and will become even harder after graduation. I want to convey a sense of hope and light to encourage myself—maybe other people as well, if that’s possible. Some inexpressible words can be blended into a painting.

Taylor Chism: My inspiration for the pieces I put in the show and for much of the work I create is thinking about how much technology, media, big data, etc. is advancing and how we all interact with it on a daily basis. Much of technology we use today was nonexistent 30, 50 years ago, and it now influences our lives in huge ways. I also think about my work as another perspective of reality—in the way that the majority of society live their lives online—and seeing that as like its own digital world hidden within reality. I find it all fascinating, so I express this through my form of art. #DigitalChaos

A painting that references images of the a ride home on the 130s Silver Bus.

Grace Han’s “MTD Ride Home”

Stephen: What was the process like creating your submission?

Sammy Al-Asmar: Both of these were made on Photoshop. For the first one, I really had to push what I knew about my own design. I nearly made the green one look just like another artwork of mine and I got really sad. But I found out a way to make it different from something I have ever made before. For the second one, that came about as I was making a different graphic. I was taking a break because I was not enjoying it, and I then started to look at this photograph I took over the summer and just pushed it until I was tired of it. That was a good experience for me as it took me a short time to work on it, but I still knew how to exhaust myself in a shorter time to make something fulfilling for me rather than working a whole week straight and doubting myself.

A green background with Mais printed three times. Over the top is a black quarter with gold outlined text and rims with the heads side showing. The eyes are X'd out and 3 red lines go down from the eyes.

Sammy Al-Asmar’s “Beggars in Buenos Aires”

Sammy Al-Asmar’s “Beggars in Buenos Aires”

Ji Hyun Han: My paintings that are displayed in the Student Art Gallery were works from my painting classes. They vary work time from 2 to 3 weeks. For my 130 Silver bus painting, I used oil paint and for my “Battlefields” painting, I used acrylic to paint and other medium to make the surface three-dimensional. My bus painting was made with a reference photograph that I took myself. I carried a DSLR camera and walked around campus trying to capture some photographs for this project. On my way back home on the 130S Silver bus, I tried taking shots at random things like the pole with the stop button or the trash can. I was doing what I had to do, but everyone on that bus probably thought of me weirdly.

Stephen: Is there anything you’d want students and all of the U of I community to know about your featured art?

Emma Sielaff: I don’t really know… My art doesn’t really have a purpose—nor do I think most art does. I make art because it’s what I want to do, and because it’s what I feel is fun. I may be selfish in that way, but all art is.

Taylor Chism: Just to view it with an open mind and almost reflect on yourself about how much you spend attached to your devices or to think about how much your life may be influenced by technology and media

A huge thanks to the artists for contributing to both this blog post and adding beauty and unique sparks of creativity to the UGL’s Student Art Gallery. A full list of all artists currently featured in the Student Art Gallery and where you can find more of their work is below.

The second display case of the Undergraduate Student Art Gallery.

The Student Art Gallery’s second display case

Taylor Chism (TV Head, Digital Bus). Find more of their work at their Instagram or Facebook @majestic_platypus.

Grace Han (Battlefield, MTD Ride Home). Find more of their work at www.jihyungracehan.com.

Sammy Al-Asmar (Born Slippy, Beggars in Buenos Aires). Sammy’s work will soon be featured on the cover of The Collective Magazine. Their work can also be seen on their Instagram (@ibn.said) or at www.sammyalasmar.com.

Allison Garetto (Alma).

Yi Zhuang (Untitled).

Holly Situ (Untitled).

Emma Sielaff (In Wonderland, In Wonderland Part 2, & Land, Sky and Space).

Interview and blog post conducted and written by Stephen-Margelony-Lajoie

Edited by Zander

 

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She Changed Comics

Comics has a long and fraught history with censorship, which brought the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund into existence. A non-profit determined to protect the First Amendment rights of comics as a whole, their work takes them beyond the courtroom. They created She Changed Comics as a series of tumblr posts to educate people on female comic authors and artists during Women’s History Month before it became a book helmed by Betsy Gomez. It made the Amelia Bloomer Book List this year, an awards list for feminist literature.

Comic Book Legal Defense Fund Logo

Comic Book Legal Defense Fund

The UGL is excited to host She Changed Comics panelists in the Media Commons on Monday April 24th at 4pm! Our panelists will talk about the influence women have had on comics and how they built the format into the diverse and empowering storytelling medium it is today.

Betsy Gomez will be joining cartoonist Nina Paley, comic historian Carol Tilley, and international librarian Mara Thacker on Monday to talk feminism, censorship, and intersectionality in the comic industry around the world.

Interested in reading more feminist comics before our event? The UGL’s got you covered. Not only do we have the book She Changed Comics, but we have intersectional comics to recommend!

She Changed Comics: The Untold Story of the Women Who Changed Free Expression in Comics

She Changed Comics: The Untold Story of the Women Who Changed Free Expression in Comics

She Changed Comics: The Untold Story of the Women Who Changed Free Expression in Comics. Presented by Comic Book Legal Defense Fund; edited by Betsy Gomez 

Undergrad: PN6710 .S34 2016

She Changed Comics celebrates the women who changed free expression in comics, with profiles of more than sixty groundbreaking female professionals and interviews with the women who are changing today’s medium, including Raina Telgemeier, Noelle Stevenson, G. Willow Wilson, and more! She Changed Comics also examines the plights of women imprisoned and threatened for making comics and explores the work of women whose work is being banned here in the United States.

Lumberjanes, Vol. 1

Lumberjanes, Vol. 1

Lumberjanes, Vol. 1: Beware the Kitten Holy by Noelle Stevenson and Grace Ellis

Undergrad: PN6720.L863 L863 2015

Friendship to the max! Jo, April, Mal, Molly and Ripley are five best pals determined to have an awesome summer together…and they’re not gonna let any insane quest or an array of supernatural critters get in their way! It’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer meets Gravity Falls and features five butt-kicking, rad teenage girls wailing on monsters and solving a mystery with the whole world at stake.

Bitch Planet, Vol 1: Extraordinary Machine

Bitch Planet, Vol 1: Extraordinary Machine

Bitch Planet, Vol 1: Extraordinary Machine by Kelly Sue DeConnick and Valentine De Landro

Undergrad: PN6720.B5834 B5834 2015 v.1

In a future just a few years down the road in the wrong direction, a woman’s failure to comply with her patriarchal overlords will result in exile to the meanest penal planet in the galaxy. When the newest crop of fresh femmes arrive, can they work together to stay alive or will hidden agendas, crooked guards, and the deadliest sport on (or off!) Earth take them to their maker?

Monstress, Vol 1: Awakening

Monstress, Vol 1: Awakening

Monstress, Vol 1: Awakening by Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda

Illinois Street Residence Hall: 741.5 L7405mo

Set in an alternate matriarchal 1900’s Asia, in a richly imagined world of art deco-inflected steam punk, Monstress tells the story of a teenage girl who is struggling to survive the trauma of war, and who shares a mysterious psychic link with a monster of tremendous power, a connection that will transform them both and make them the target of both human and otherworldly powers.

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, Vol 1: Squirrel Power

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, Vol 1: Squirrel Power

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl, Vol 1: Squirrel Power by Ryan North and Erica Henderson

Undergrad: PN6720.S695 S695 2015 v.1

Doctor Doom, Deadpool, even Thanos: There’s one hero who’s beaten them all — and now she’s starring in her own series! That’s right, it’s SQUIRREL GIRL! The nuttiest and most upbeat super hero in the world is starting college! And as if meeting her new roommate and getting to class on time isn’t hard enough, now she has to deal with Kraven the Hunter, too? At least her squirrel friend Tippy-Toe is on hand to help out. But what can one girl, and one squirrel, do when a hungry Galactus heads toward Earth? You’d be surprised! With time running out and Iron Man lending a helping hand (sort of), who will win in the battle between the Power Cosmic and the Power Chestnut?

Have thoughts on She Changed Comics?  Let us know on our Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram pages, and don’t forget to attend the She Changed Comics panel in the Media Commons on Monday April 24th at 4pm!

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