Mark Your Calendars — Week of November 16

PLAS Announcements

October LSAT Takers – We Want Your Feedback! If you sat for the October LSAT, we ask that you take a few minutes to let us know what study method you used and how helpful you thought it was in preparing for the LSAT. We have prepared a short questionnaire for you to complete, which can be found here.

Law School Opportunities for Undergrads

University of Chicago Law School invites Illinois students and alumni to attend their Open House on Monday, November 23 (during our Fall Break) from 9 am – 1 pm. The Open House will include a class and a tour of the school. You will also get to meet with the offices of Admissions and Financial Aid. To register, visit their website here.

Free Midwest Law School Virtual Fair–Meet over 20 different law schools without leaving the house at the free Midwest Law School Virtual Fair on Tuesday, November 17. Talk to admissions reps in live chat sessions online, get immediate answers to application or school related questions, and learn more about law schools around the midwest. Registration is free; click here to register and find out more details.

Pre-Law students are invited to the following free event at the University of Illinois College of Law. 

Interested in criminal law? The College of Law also invites pre-law students to attend Meet the Exoneree on Tuesday, November 17 at noon in the College of Law Auditorium, featuring Kristine Bunch. Ms. Bunch was wrongfully convicted and freed with the help of the Criminal Law Program and the Illinois Innocence Project after serving 17 years in prison. Hear from Ms. Bunch and learn more about the Illinois Innocence Project. Lunch will be served for free for attendees.

Scholarship/Fellowship Opportunities!

Carlson Caspers Inclusion and Diversity Scholarship Program – University of Illinois STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) students are especially invited to apply for this opportunity.

This scholarship program is for current undergrads who will enter law school in Fall, 2016, and intend to practice intellectual property law in the Twin Cities area upon graduation. Deadline is March 1, 2016      Visit their website for more information and to apply: http://carlsoncaspers.com/Firm/InclusionAndDiversity/1LDiversityScholarshipProgram

Boren Undergraduate Scholarships for Study Abroad 

Studying a less-commonly-taught language? Seeking linguistic and cultural immersion? Boren Undergraduate Scholarships provide unique funding opportunities for freshman through seniors to study language and culture in non-Western regions critical to US interests. Applicants must be U.S. citizens.

The strongest candidates have a solid academic record and the potential to succeed in their proposed study abroad experience, as well as clear plans for how they will use the target language in their future academic and professional endeavors. Boren Scholars commit to working in the federal government for at least 1 year after graduation.

The maximum awards are:
• $10,000 for a semester
• $20,000 for an academic year
• For STEM students only: $8,000 for a summer program (8 weeks minimum)

ROTC participants: see the special Boren-ROTC Initiative

The campus deadline is January 19, 2016. Please learn more about the campus process here. For complete information on Boren Awards preferred languages and countries, click here.

Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship

This fellowship is available to both graduate and undergraduate students.  Awards will be given for the summer and the academic year.  The awards are for study in modern foreign languages in combination with area studies, area aspects of professional studies or international studies.  The awards include tuition/fee payments and a generous stipend!

Info sessions: Thursday, December 3 and Friday, December 4, 126 GLSIS, 4-5pm.  For more information, visit http://publish.illinois.edu/illinoisflas/aboutflas. 

Have a great week!

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Your Opportunity to Meet Legal Professionals

On November 9, Pre-Law Advising Services and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute present a special opportunity for pre-law students to engage with legal professionals. The following lawyers, who represent a variety of legal practice specialties, will be here at 5:00 in 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building. Network with these lawyers, find out what the legal profession is really like, and learn about the skills you can be building now to make yourself a great advocate. Join us! This is a great opportunity to gain insight into the entire spectrum of professional legal life.

These lawyers will be joining us for the event:

Jim Kearns is currently an adjunct professor at the College of Law, teaching Pretrial Litigation. In 2010, after practicing for 35 years with Heyl, Royster, Voelker & Allen, the last 29 as managing partner of the Urbana office, Jim formally retired from active practice; he continues to handle select cases for the firm in an “of counsel” capacity.

Jim’s practice with the Heyl firm was devoted to civil litigation, with emphasis for most of his career on trial of catastrophic injury cases in a wide variety of areas, including medical malpractice and products liability, as well as railroad, airline and trucking accidents. Jim has been involved in employment law and civil rights cases as well. During his active practice, Jim was a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, and was regularly chosen by his peers as both a Leading Lawyer and a “Super Lawyer” in the area of civil litigation, designations limited to 5% of Illinois attorneys.

Jim graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 1966, and, following a stint in the United States Army, from the University of Illinois College of Law in 1975.

Marilyn B. Resch was in the private practice of law for 39 years, most of that time representing clients in family and marital issues.  She retired from the active practice of law in December 2012.

Prior to opening Resch Siemer Law Office, LLC in Effingham in September 2008 with Martin W. Siemer, Marilyn was a partner with the Effingham law firm of Siemer, Austin, Resch, Fuhr & Totten from 1976 to 2008.  Before coming to Effingham in 1976, Marilyn worked for the National Labor Relations Board in Peoria and for the Illinois Attorney General’s Office in Springfield in the Environmental Division.

When Marilyn came to private practice in 1976 she was one of the first female attorneys in the area.  She soon developed an active family law practice, covering cases in at least eleven counties in Central Illinois.  She handled numerous contested custody and property division divorce cases, post-divorce modification cases, including child support and visitation modifications, orders of protection proceedings, and paternity disputes. For more than 15 years Marilyn was also the City Attorney for the City of Casey. Marilyn was rated AV by Martindale Hubbell and for a number of years she was recommended by her peers for the Leading Lawyers Network.

Timothy O. Smith, a 1970 (History) and 1973 (Law) graduate of the University of Illinois, practiced law in Danville, Illinois from 1977 until his retirement in 2010. During the last 13 years he was a sole practitioner.  Prior to his arrival in Danville, Tim severed in the U S Navy’s Judge Advocate Generals Corps, first as Base Defense Counsel at NAS Oceana, Virginia Beach, Virginia, and then on the staff of the Judge Advocate General in Washington, D.C.. His Danville practice began as a general practice and over the years narrowed to banking, commercial transactions, business entities, estates, trusts, and complex creditor representation in bankruptcy.

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Mark Your Calendars — Week of October 5

There is a lot going on this week, beginning with the 2015 Law School Fair, which is TOMORROW.  Make sure you scroll all the way to the bottom to learn about a paid position, scholarship opportunities and more!

PLAS Events

2015 Law School Fair – TOMORROW, October 6, 2015 – Illini Union Rooms A, B, C

Our biggest event of the year is almost here! Join us for the 2015 Law School Fair TOMORROW, Tuesday, October 6 from 10:00-2:00 at the Illini Union! Over 100 law schools will be here to visit with ALL students. Dress is business casual. It is not necessary to bring a résumé, but you may bring business cards. Most schools will have a sign-in sheet for you to provide your contact information if you wish. Bring your questions about the schools and their programs. Find out about joint degree programs. Ask about scholarships. Talk with admissions reps about what law schools are looking for. Ask questions, collect some freebies and fee waivers, and learn about law school admissions from the experts. For more details like who’s coming and what to expect, check out our website. See you there!

Perfecting Your Personal Statement & Resume for Law School: Thursday, October 8, 12:30 – 1:30 pm in IUB 514.

The personal statement and resume are a law school applicant’s opportunity to tell a school all about yourself and why you will make a great addition to their class. Students consistently tell us that this is the hardest part of the application, so we have developed this workshop to provide some insight. We will cover: What the personal statement is; how to begin writing it; what to include and exclude; writing separate addenda; how the personal statement and resume should work together; and an overview of the law school resume. Bring your questions because there will be plenty of time to ask them. Please register here.

Campus Events and Opportunities

LAS Student Success Workshop: Argumentation and Analysis in Academic Essays, 3:00-4:50 pm Tuesday, Oct. 6 in 1 Foreign Language Building. This workshop is designed to provide strategy and guidelines about writing assignments such as understanding the nature of the assignment, creating a format, conducting scholarly research and putting ideas in the paper in a coherent manner to help students succeed. The primary focus is on making fact-based arguments and writing straight-forward papers using current academic knowledge, general knowledge/observations and research skills.

English Department Alumni Career Panel – Wednesday, October 7, 5:00-6:30 p.m. Gregory Hall 213

Curious about what you can do with your undergraduate degree? This is your chance to hear from English and Creative Writing alumni with experience in law, education, politics, entrepreneurship, publishing, fundraising, communication, PR, and web design. We’ll have refreshments and plenty of time for Q&A. We welcome students in all majors to one of our most popular annual events! RSVP at https://illinois.edu/fb/sec/7170247. We hope to see you there!

Critical Language Scholarship Information Session – Thursday, October 8, 3:30-4:30pm, Room 514 Illini Union Bookstore (807 S. Wright St, entrance near Coble Hall)

The Critical Language Scholarship (CLS), from the U.S. Department of State, is a fully-funded, intensive overseas language and cultural immersion program for American undergraduate and graduate students in ALL fields. The CLS institutes cover one academic year of university-level language coursework in 8 to 10 weeks over the summer, and include cultural programming, local language partners, and excursions. Participants receive academic credit at their U.S. institutions. Applicants must be U.S. citizens at least 18 years of age and enrolled in a degree-granting program at the undergraduate or graduate level.

Our advisors, who have served as national-level CLS reviewers, will provide an overview of the program and give you helpful guidance on how to put together a competitive application. You will also hear from Illinois CLS alumni who spent summer 2015 in overseas language institutes on the scholarship.

Languages Offered
No previous study required: Azerbaijani, Bangla, Hindi, Indonesian, Korean, Punjabi, Swahili, Turkish, Urdu
1 year of study required: Arabic, Persian
2 years of study required: Chinese, Japanese, Russian

For more information, please visit: http://www.clscholarship.org/.

Apply to Become an I-Connect Facilitator — Apply BEFORE October 9!

Are You Passionate About Diversity and Inclusion? Will you like to help make change on your campus? Become an I-Connect Facilitator!!! Diversity and Social Justice Education is looking for undergraduate students to facilitate I-Connect Diversity and Inclusion Workshops starting in Spring 2016.

The I-Connect Diversity and Inclusion Workshop is an initiative of the Office of Inclusion and Intercultural Relations, and the Division of Student Affairs. Students of color, LGBTQ students and allies, international students, and students with disabilities are highly encouraged to apply.

Students of diverse backgrounds will be able to use their to use their positionality and their unique perspectives to guide new students to understand and accept diversity and inclusion not only on the University of Illinois campus, but in their personal and professional lives as well. Experience facilitating difficult conversations is a must! The position is paid, and interviews will be held in mid-October.

Apply BEFORE October 9th at the link: https://illinois.edu/fb/sec/409195.  For more information, contact: diversityed@illinois.edu or 217-244-1814

Freshman Scholarship

The Kevin T. Early Memorial Scholarship ($2,000) is open to freshman students who demonstrate an aptitude for writing poetry. To apply, submit 5 poems by Oct. 30 to Jennifer Price, Department of English, jajones6@illinois.edu. Include your name, address, phone number, email, and UIN on a title sheet with your submission. Do not include a name on the poems themselves.

Career Center Workshops – Unless otherwise indicated, all workshops are held at the Career Center, 715 S. Wright Street. For more information or to register for an event, click here.

  • Career Fair Prep: Maximizing Your Experience Tues, Oct 6, 4-5pm.
  • Strategic Use of Linked In for International Students Tues, Oct. 6, 4-5:30pm

    The Interview Suite, 616 E. Green (enter Kaplan building next to McDonald’s and head to 2nd floor)
  • Finding an Internship Wed, Oct 7, 4-5pm
  • Creating Powerful Resumes and Cover Letters Wed, Oct. 7, 5-6pm

College of Law Events

This Wednesday, Oct. 7 from 10:30-12:30, watch the Illinois Fourth District Appellate Court hear oral arguments for both a criminal and a civil case at the College of Law (Rowe Auditorium).

Illinois Supreme Court Justice Anne M. Burke will speak at the College of Law on Fri, Oct. 9, from 12-1 pm. This event is free and open to the public, and lunch will be provided. Click here for more details. 

Have a great week!

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Mark Your Calendars — Week of September 14

PLAS Events

Perfecting Your Personal Statement & Resume for Law School: Next Monday, September 21, 4:00 – 5:00 pm in IUB 514.

The personal statement and resume are a law school applicant’s opportunity to tell a school all about yourself and why you will make a great addition to their class. Students consistently tell us that this is the hardest part of the application, so we have developed this workshop to provide some insight. We will cover: what the personal statement is; how to begin writing it; what to include and exclude; writing separate addenda; how the personal statement and resume should work together; and an overview of the law school resume. Bring your questions because there will be plenty of time to ask them. Please register here.

Campus Events

Pre-Law Club/Pre-Law Honors Society Informational Meeting

Interested in learning more about joining either Pre-Law Club or Pre-Law Honors Society?  The clubs will be having a joint information session this Wednesday, September 16, at 7pm in Wohlers Hall, classroom TBD. Please RSVP by clicking on the following link by midnight tomorrow, September 15 https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1AXqUinyYBVK5i1tjDmrgJip1VPAemh6wbXlxKm7Br8M/viewform?usp=send_form.

Career Center

Career Center Workshops – Unless otherwise indicated, all workshops are held at the Career Center, 715 S. Wright Street. For more information or to register for an event, click here.

  • Career Fair Prep: Maximize Your Experience, TODAY, September 14, 5-6 p.m
  • Getting the Job – Interviewing Tips Tuesday, September 15, 4-5pm
  • Creating Powerful Resumes & Cover Letters, Tuesday, September 15, 5-6pm
  • Internships and CPT for International Students, Tuesday, September 15, 4-5pm The Interview Suite 213, 616 E. Green (enter Kaplan building next to McDonald’s and head to 2nd floor)
  • Business Career Fair, Wednesday, September 16, 2-7pm, and Thursday, September 17, 2-7pm, Activities and Recreational Center (ARC)
  • Pizza and A Professional “Interning at Research Park”, Friday, September 18,
    12:00 PM1:00 PM
    The Interview Suite 213, 616 E. Green (enter Kaplan building next to McDonald’s and head to 2nd floor)

History Careers Night –  Thursday, September 17, 2015,  5 PM-7PM, 1002 Lincoln Hall

Come hear what four successful entrepreneurs did with their History degrees! All majors are welcome! Refreshments provided! Sponsored by the Department of History.

PANELISTS:

Anne Lukeman, Coordinator of Video Production, Office of Public Affairs, UIUC
Scott Mayer, Account Manager, Gamma Partners LLC
Steven Schulwolf, Principal Attorney/Managing Partner, Law Firm of Michaels, Schulwolf & Salerno, P.C.
Frank Valadez, Executive Director, Chicago Metro History Education Center (CMHEC)

Illinois Leadership Center

Petullo Insight on September 19th, 2015, 8:30am

What do you need to learn about yourself to become an effective leader? What are your unique strengths and weaknesses as a leader? The Petullo Insight Leadership program is designed to help students focus on the personal knowledge required for effective leadership in a complex, changing world.  Discover your strengths, values, social identities, and explore your intrinsic leadership styles. Enroll for Insight now! http://www.illinoisleadership.illinois.edu/_auth/login.asp.
All of the Illinois Leadership Center’s services are at no additional cost to students. These programs have attendance from students across campus so freshman, sophomores, juniors, seniors and graduate students are welcome!

College of Law Opportunities and Events

Volunteer Opportunities at the College of Law

Interested in getting an inside view of law school as law students learn trial skills?

Volunteer witnesses are needed for three hours the evening of Sept. 29 and/or Sept. 30 (Tues. or Wed.).  Witnesses would get some basic training, a script and exposure to being on the witness stand.  No knowledge required.  It is all in the information.  Witnesses are needed to testify on fingerprint, DNA, medical evidence and cause of death.  Contact Julie Campbell jjhill@illinois. edu or 333-5842 to sign up.

Volunteer jurors are needed to hear opening statements from College of Law students enrolled in the Trial Advocacy Program from 6:30-9:00pm October 13 and 14 at the Champaign County Courthouse. You may volunteer for one night or more.  Opening statements are from a homicide and a serious personal injury case.  Contact Julie Campbell, jjhill@illinois.edu or 333-5842 to sign up.

Events at the College of Law

Adam Liptak will deliver “The Roberts Court at Ten: A Reporter’s Reflections” for the fall 2015 Paul M. Van Arsdell, Jr. Memorial Lecture on Litigation and the Legal Profession on Tuesday, September 15, at Noon, in the Max L. Rowe Auditorium at the College of Law, 504 East Pennsylvania Avenue. Liptak is the Supreme Court correspondent of The New York Times. Lunch will be provided for lecture attendees. The lecture is free and open to the public.

The COL will host a Constitution Day Panel: The Roberts Court Turns Ten on Sept. 17 at 12:00 pm in the Rowe Auditorium of the Law Building. College of Law Dean Vikram David Amar and Professors Eric Johnson, Kurt Lash, Jason Mazzone, and Robin Fretwell Wilson will discuss the decisions of the Supreme Court over the past decade and where the Court is headed in the future. Lunch will be provided for lecture attendees.

Check the College of Law’s website for additional events that are open to public: http://law.illinois.edu/.

More Pre-Law Opportunities

Michigan State University College of Law Webinars

Michigan State University College of Law will host a variety of FREE webinars this fall for college students and graduates who are exploring or planning for law school. As noted below, webinars will focus on LSAT preparation, preparing a personal statement, financing law school, and legal careers.

Webinar presenters are highly experienced content-area experts (including pre-law advisors; the former director of Harvard Law School admissions; the former dean of admissions at the University of Virginia Law School; and legal career consultants and professionals). There is no cost to participate and webinar attendees will have the opportunity to interact with presenters during the 15-minute Q and A segment.

• Sept. 22: Strategies for Success on the LSAT
• Oct. 14: Crafting a Winning Law School Personal Statement
• Oct. 21: Preparing for Success in Law School: Expert Advice for Undergraduates
• Oct. 27: Expert Advice for Assembling a Competitive Law School Application
• Nov. 3: Career Options and Market Outlook for Attorneys
• Nov 17: Developing a Financial Plan for Law School
• Dec. 1: Tips for Assembling a Competitive Law School Application

To learn more about these webinars and to register, click here!

Stayed tuned for more excellent pre-law programming and have a great week!

 

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June LSAT Test Takers Checklist

The June LSAT is Monday, June 8, which is only five and a half weeks away.  What should you be doing both now and on the day of the exam?  The Law School Admission Council (LSAC) provides the following checklist.  As always, if you have any questions about LSAC’s requirements contact them directly at (215) 968-1001 or by completing an online form which can be found here.

Now or as soon as possible:
  1. Check your ID –
    • Is it an acceptable government-issued ID as stipulated at LSAC.org and on the LSAT Candidate Information Sheet (pages 3-5)?
    • Is it current (or has it expired within 90 days of your test)?
    • Does it contain a recent, recognizable photo?
    • Does it contain your date of birth?
    • Do your first and last names match the names on your LSAT Admission Ticket and your ID exactly? Corrections must be submitted no later than 5:00 PM (ET) on the Friday before the test.
  2. Obtain a passport-type photo (no larger than 2×2 inches or 5×5 cm and no smaller  than 1×1 inch or 3×3 cm). The photo must be a different photograph than the one on your government-issued ID. You will not be admitted if the photo on the admission ticket is the same as the photo on your ID.

One week before the test:

  1. Obtain a clear, plastic ziplock bag (maximum size 1 gallon/3.79 liters) to contain the allowable items.  Go here for LSAC’s list of allowable items.
  2. Update your email and mailing addresses if necessary at LSAC.org.
 The day before your scheduled test:
  1. Print an updated LSAT Admission Ticket from your online account to ensure that you  have the final and correct reporting address for the test center.
  2. Check the school’s website and print directions and a campus map.
  3. Review the list of items allowed in the ziplock bag. Read pages 3–5 of the LSAT  Candidate Information Sheet and read the Test Center Regulations at LSAC.org.
Test day:
  1. Report to the test center no later than the reporting time indicated on your LSAT Admission Ticket. Take only page 1 of the Admission Ticket to the test center. Leave this checklist and pages 3–5 at home.
  2. Do not take any prohibited items or electronic devices (including cell phones) to the test center. Possession and/or use of such items is grounds for immediate dismissal from the test.
  3. For more information or a copy of this LSAC-crafted checklist, go here:  http://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/jd-docs/lsat-checklist.pdf
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Paralegal Certificates: A Path to Law School?

A paralegal position can be helpful because it will allow you to “get your feet wet” and learn some tangible, transferable skills.  Such a position will also allow you to see the practice of law first-hand before deciding whether the field is the right fit for you. Moreover, law school admission departments and hiring partners at law firms will see the experience as a positive aspect of your resume.  Working as a paralegal (or anything else) prior to law school will not make up for poor grades or low LSAT scores, but it may offer a better chance at admission in some cases.  Some schools, such as Harvard and Northwestern, view work experience as nearly a prerequisite to admission.

Deciding whether to pursue a paralegal certificate prior to law school is an additional decision that requires serious contemplation.  A certification in paralegal studies can cost thousands of dollars in tuition as well as months of additional schooling.  The debt accrued in terms of time and money may not be worth the investment for someone who is not considering a paralegal position as a possible career path in itself.  Moreover, the costs associated with a paralegal certificate may not be necessary because some law firms are willing to hire job-seekers for paralegal positions without a certification.

Going straight from undergraduate to a paralegal position without any law firm experience can prove difficult, but that is not the only available option.  One non-conventional path to becoming a paralegal is to take a job at a law firm as either an assistant or another similar administrative role.  This will allow you to learn how the firm works and what is required of its paralegals.  During your time at the firm you can speak with current paralegals about their responsibilities and make clear your intentions to join their ranks.  With such knowledge and experience in hand, you can apply for a paralegal position within the firm or elsewhere.  The issue with this path is time.  Often a transition of this type may take at least a couple of years.  If you foresee yourself applying to law school within a year of graduation, the paralegal route may not be the best option.

Becoming a paralegal can have many advantages in terms of learning the legal industry, developing tangible skills and becoming more attractive to certain law schools.  Additionally, if you are on the fence about applying to law school, working as a paralegal will give you first-hand knowledge of the field, while also allowing you to save up for tuition expenses.  Working prior to law school can be a valuable asset for your career, but it is not required at all law schools.  If you are not sure whether to work for a period of time prior to law school, speak with friends and family or check with schools you are interested in to see how highly they value work experience.

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Mark Your Calendars – Week of March 16th  

PLAS Events

Financing Your Legal Education: An Access Group Webinar: Friday, April 3, 2015, 1:00 – 2:00 PM (online). How will you finance your legal education? This workshop features Joni Bradley-Scott from Access Group, a nonprofit providing excellent resources in support of financial education for graduate students. Joni will provide an overview of law school financial aid including how it works and what students can do to maximize aid. She will share many helpful resources students can use to effectively finance their legal education. Registration is limited to the first 25 students. To register, go here.

The Path to Practicing Law in the US: An International Law Student Panel & Discussion: Wednesday, April 5, 2015, 4:30 – 5:30 PM in IUB Room 514. Are you an international student considering attending law school in the U.S.? Join us as we host a panel of international law students from China and Brazil. PLAS welcomes four current College of Law international students, Ning Ning, Andre Reis, Zhiqi Wu and Xi Zhou, to answer questions and discuss their experiences studying law in the U.S. After the panel, students will get to talk to the speakers in small groups. Bring your questions! For more information on the event and the panelists, go here. Food will be served. No registration necessary.

For more info about these and other PLAS Events, go here.

 

June LSAT Update

Are you planning on taking the LSAT this June?  Registration is open and spots are beginning to fill. LSAC tells us that one Chicago LSAT Test Center, Loyola-Chicago, is already full.  Consequently, if you know you are taking the June LSAT but haven’t registered yet, you should do that ASAP.  For more information and to register, go here.

 

Campus Events

Career Center Workshops

Unless otherwise indicated, all workshops are held at the Career Center, 715 S. Wright Street. For more information or to register, go here.

Creating Powerful Resumes and Cover Letters, Monday, March 16, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Career Fair Prep: Maximize Your Experience, Monday, March 16, 5:00 – 6:00 PM or Tuesday, March 17, 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Diversity & Inclusion Networking Exchange, Tuesday, March 17, 5:30 – 7:30 PM, held in the Illini Union Ballroom

Coffee Chat at the Career Center, Wednesday, March 18, 4:30 – 5:30 PM

Getting the Job: Interviewing Tips, Wednesday, March 18, 6:00 – 7:00 PM

Strategic Use of LinkedIn for International Students, Thursday, March 19, 4:00 – 5:30 PM, held in The Interview Suite, 616 E. Green

 

 Remember — the All Campus Career Fair is this Wednesday, March 18, 12-4pm, at the ARC!

 

Illinois in Washington – Spend Fall Interning and Taking Classes in Washington, DC!

Fall is the best time to come to Washington – lovely weather and less competition for internships. Plus you can apply for internships over summer instead of during the school year!

Illinois in Washington is an academic internship program open to all Illinois undergraduates. Students live in Washington, DC, for a semester, intern 4 days a week and take U of I classes. Students intern in a range of positions from nonprofits and government agencies to think tanks and consulting firms.

For more information on IIW and our application, see our website and check out ourFacebook page. For views from students, visit our blog If you have any questions, please email Susan Halebsky Dimock, PhD, Interim Director, Illinois in Washington, at sdimock@illinois.edu. We look forward to your applications. Fall 2015 Application Deadline: April 1.

 

Off Campus Event

Chicagoland Law Fair: Thursday, March 26, 6-8:30pm

Harold Washington Library, Multipurpose Rooms A & B

Lower Level, 400 South State Street, Chicago

Hosted by Chicagoland Law Schools:

This event is sponsored by the Chicagoland law schools.  It is designed to help prospective law students assess whether law school is the right choice for them.  The program presenters will provide information about the legal market and the application process.  The structure is similar to large regional law fairs but the intent is that with a smaller group of law schools, participants in the program will enjoy a more intimate setting.

Schedule of Events

6:00 – 6:30 p.m. The Future of the Chicago Legal Market
6:30 – 7:00 p.m. Hot Topics for Law School Applicants
7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Law School Fair: Meet with representatives from seven Chicagoland law schools

Registration is required – the deadline is TODAY, Monday, March 16, 2015.  For more information and to register, go here.

 

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Mark Your Calendars — Week of March 9

Scroll down for info about this week’s visit from Nicole Vilches, IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law Assistant Dean for Admissions, an update about the June LSAT, the Chicagoland Law Fair on March 26, Illinois in Washington and more!

PLAS Events and Information

Chicago-Kent College of Law presents: Building Relationships with Law Schools this Wednesday, March 11, from 5-6 pm in 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building

Whether students are meeting law admissions staff at a fair, visiting during an open house, or working with admissions offices to maximize their aid, building relationships with law admissions professionals is critical before, during, and after admission to law school. Nicole Vilches, Assistant Dean for Admissions at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law, will share the secrets to developing strong relationships with admissions professionals. Pre-law students at every level will gain valuable insight at this workshop.

June LSAT Update

Are you planning on taking the LSAT this June?  Registration is open and spots are beginning to fill. LSAC tells us that one Chicago LSAT Test Center, Loyola-Chicago, is already full.  Consequently, if you know you are taking the June LSAT but haven’t registered yet, you should do that ASAP.  For more information and to register, go here.

Campus Events and Information

The Illinois Leadership Center presents Ignite, a workshop to develop skill in leading change and understanding systems thinking, on March 14 from 10:00 am – 5:45 pm. For more information and to register, visit their website here.

Career Center Workshops

Unless otherwise indicated, all Career Center events will be held at the Career Center, 715 S. Wright Street. For more information or to register for any of these programs, go here.

  • Selling Your LAS Degree (Social Sciences) at the All-Campus Career Fair, March 9, 1022 Lincoln Hall, 6-7pm
  • Selling Your LAS Degree (Humanities) at the All-Campus Career Fair, March 10, 1022 Lincoln Hall, 6-7pm
  • Creating Powerful Cover Letters and Resumes, March 10, 5-6pm.
  • Selling Your LAS Degree (Sciences) at the All-Campus Career Fair, March 11, 1022 Lincoln Hall, 6-7pm
  • Utilizing Your Strengths to Plan Your Career, March 11 5:30-7pm, Illini Union 406
  • Finding an Internship, March 12, 6-7 pm.

 Remember — the All Campus Career Fair is next Wednesday, March 18, 12-4pm, at the ARC!

Illinois in Washington – Spend Fall Interning and Taking Classes in Washington, DC!

Fall is the best time to come to Washington – lovely weather and less competition for internships. Plus you can apply for internships over summer instead of during the school year!

Illinois in Washington is an academic internship program open to all Illinois undergraduates. Students live in Washington, DC, for a semester, intern 4 days a week and take U of I classes. Students intern in a range of positions from nonprofits and government agencies to think tanks and consulting firms.

For more information on IIW and our application, see our website and check out our Facebook page. For views from students, visit our blog If you have any questions, please email Susan Halebsky Dimock, PhD, Interim Director, Illinois in Washington, at sdimock@illinois.edu. We look forward to your applications. Fall 2015 Application Deadline: April 1.

Off Campus Event

Chicagoland Law Fair: Thursday, March 26, 6-8:30pm

Harold Washington Library, Multipurpose Rooms A & B

Lower Level, 400 South State Street, Chicago

Hosted by Chicagoland Law Schools:

This event is sponsored by the Chicagoland law schools.  It is designed to help prospective law students assess whether law school is the right choice for them.  The program presenters will provide information about the legal market and the application process.  The structure is similar to large regional law fairs but the intent is that with a smaller group of law schools, participants in the program will enjoy a more intimate setting.

Schedule of Events

6:00 – 6:30 p.m. The Future of the Chicago Legal Market
6:30 – 7:00 p.m. Hot Topics for Law School Applicants
7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Law School Fair: Meet with representatives from seven Chicagoland law schools

Registration is required on or before Monday, March 16, 2015.  For more information and to register, go here.

 

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Summer 2015 Pre-Law Programs

Still trying to figure out what to do this summer to either make yourself a better applicant or prepare for law school?  Several law schools have summer pre-law programs with deadlines approaching. We have provided information for some of these below. For more info about other summer pre-law programs, go to the PLAS Compass page and click on “Summer Pre-Law Programs.”

Harvard/NYU Trials Program: Harvard Law School – June 28-August 7, 2015 Applications DUE NEXT FRIDAY, February 27, 2015

Trials is a unique partnership of NYU School of Law, Harvard Law School, and the Advantage Testing Foundation. It is a fully subsidized/full scholarship summer study program for students of modest means whose backgrounds are currently underrepresented at the nation’s top law schools. Students are not responsible for any tuition, fees, or related expenses. In addition, each Trials student also receives a $3,000 stipend to replace or supplement summer employment income.

In addition to the academic curriculum of the program, every Trials student will receive:

  • Transportation to and from the host university campus (Harvard Law School in 2015)
  • Campus housing for the duration of the five-week program
  • Three daily meals at the campus dining hall
  • Access to the host university’s library, computer centers, and gym

Each week, senior instructors from Advantage Testing prepare Trials students for the LSAT by deconstructing the test and presenting a step-by-step approach to each question type. Students maintain a rigorous practice testing schedule, frequently sitting for full-length official LSATs under simulated testing conditions. Working closely with their instructors, students learn to develop an individualized study plan, focus their preparation, and apply the core principles they master.

Trials students also attend lectures presented by prominent lawyers, public figures, and legal scholars, including distinguished faculty from both NYU Law and Harvard Law School. These lectures provide a wide-ranging introduction to the study and practice of the law while giving students the opportunity to ask specific questions related to their particular fields of interest.

Perhaps most important, Trials allows students to experience communities similar to those they will encounter in law school. Students form study groups to challenge, motivate, and inspire one another. In lunches with instructors and speakers, students can take part in informal discussions to learn more about the law, their peers, and themselves.

Finally, Trials is committed to taking full advantage of the resources of its host locations. Students enter the field in Boston and New York City to meet with and observe lawyers at work, garnering practical experience that complements the academic curriculum.  This year’s program will be held at Harvard Law School June 28- August 2, 2015.  Applications are due February 27, 2015. Click here for more information or to apply.

 

ITT Chicago-Kent College of Law PLUS Program: May 31-June 19, 2015.  Applications due March 2, 2015

The IIT Chicago-Kent Prelaw Undergraduate Scholars program (“PLUS”) offers a unique and unforgettable experience for college students who are interested in the legal profession. This rigorous three-week program is designed to provide students with a “taste” of the law school experience. The program is primarily directed at undergraduate college students from disadvantaged groups that are underrepresented in the legal profession.

The PLUS program is a three-week summer institute which will: (1) introduce participants to law school and the legal profession; (2) provide participants with substantive skills to strengthen their preparation for law school; and (3) educate and prepare participants for the law school application and admission process. Students must attend all classes and participate in all program activities to receive a stipend. Because this is a full-time commitment, students must agree not to have any outside commitments that would prevent them from giving the program their full attention.

The PLUS program targets college students who have just completed either their first, second or third year in college. All students are encouraged to apply who will not have received their bachelor degree by the start of the program, but preference will be given to those who will have completed their first and second years of college by the start of the program. Students who have already completed a bachelor degree are not eligible for the program. For additional information, please download the application packet or contact Theda Mickey, Administrative Director-PLUS Program, at plus@kentlaw.iit.edu if you have any questions. Applicants must submit a $30 application fee.  In addition, accepted applicants will be required to submit a $70 seat deposit.  Both of these fees are non-refundable. Download PLUS Application

Download PLUS Brochure

2014 PLUS Program Schedule

 

CLEO Achieving Success in the Application Process (ASAP) Prelaw Seminar:

John Marshall Law School, July 11-12, 2015

Applications Due: April 1, 2015

Goal: To prepare talented, motivated, yet under-represented students to successfully gain admission to and succeed in law school.

Overview: The ASAP program curriculum will focus on aspects of the law school application process that are commonly overlooked or undervalued by students when applying to law school.

The ASAP curriculum seminar includes the following sessions:

  • Selecting a law school
  • Drafting an effective personal statement
  • Choosing sources for letters of recommendations
  • Preparation strategies for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT)
  • The impact of LSAT scores and Grade Point Averages (GPA) in the selection process
  • The significance of the early application process offered by many law schools
  • Debt management and developing credit worthiness
  • Common errors committed by law school applicants

Advantages of being an ASAP participant include:

  • Provides a head start on the law school admissions process
  • Establishes mentoring relationships with CLEO students in law school
  • Nominal fee
  • Meals provided
  • Opportunity to network with Attitude Is Essential (AIE) participants from around the country
  • An opportunity you don’t want to miss

Targeted Students:

  • ASAP is open to college juniors and seniors, as well as post-graduates.

Click here to Register online for the ASAP program.

CLEO Attitude Is Essential Seminar

John Marshall Law School — July 11 & 12, 2015

The first year of law school is the most important year.  Employers hire second year law students primarily based on their first year GPA. If you want to hear them say “You’re Hired,” and you want to be more than a law school survivor, then you need the right attitude to take control of your legal education.

At the “Attitude is Essential” (AIE) seminar, you will:

  • Develop the skills you need to take control over your own law school learning process
  • Learn how to:
    • Read and brief opinions
    • Prepare for law school exams, including the best practices for memorizing all the law you need for your exams
    • Write exams using the IRAC form
    • Conquer your workload, time, and stress in law school
  • Experience the Socratic Method by participating in a Mock Law School Class
  • Write a contracts essay exam and debrief the experience
  • Discover the benefits of study groups and how to make sure your groups are productive and not dysfunctional
  • Begin to build a network of other successful law students

Who should attend? All students who intend to begin law school in the fall of 2015.

What is required?  Applicants must have been admitted to a law school, submit an online application, and pay a $200 registration fee.

Click here for more information or to register online for the AIE Seminar.

 

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The Law School Decision, Looking Back: Attorneys’ Reflections

As undergraduate students with a pre-law major or membership in a pre-law society, you no doubt have heard how critical it is for you to make a sober and reasoned decision about whether you want to go to law school, and, perhaps more importantly,  whether you want to be a lawyer. It is rightly framed as an important decision, but it is one that people handle in different ways.

Below, six attorneys from different legal fields discuss how they felt and what they thought when making the decision to go to law school. We ask them for one piece of advice they wished they had known, or heard, when they were younger and facing this monumental decision.

Participating Attorneys:

Tony Munter: A whistleblower and False Claims Act attorney in the DC-metropolitan area, who primarily handles qui tam actions fighting fraud against the government. For more information about Tony Munter and qui tam actions, click here.

Kaveh Miremadi: A federal criminal defense and OFAC sanctions attorney. He provides clients with compliance, requests for reconsideration, SDN list removal, risk assessment, and internal audits. To learn more about Kaveh Miremadi’s background and OFAC law, visit this page.

Edward Tayter: A Maryland criminal lawyer who focuses on traffic and drunk driving cases, including DUI, DWI, driving while suspended, and restricted licenses. Information about Edward Tayter is available here.

April Cockerham: An immigration attorney who works out of DC. She represents clients in deportation proceedings, family and humanitarian-based petitions for visas and asylum, and Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) applications for domestic abuse victims. More information about April’s background and practice is available here.

Peter Biberstein: A personal injury and medical malpractice lawyer who represents clients in Virginia and DC. He handles a variety of personal injury cases, dangerous product cases, and disability claims. Visit this page for more information on Mr. Biberstein.

Terry Eaton: A DC and federal criminal defense attorney who handles white collar and government investigation cases. He is a former Assistant U.S. Attorney, and he was also a commercial litigator. Learn more about Terry’s background and practice here.

What one piece of advice do you wish you had known, or heard, when you were younger and facing the monumental decision of whether to apply to law school?

Tony Munter: Unfortunately, I think it is a much more difficult environment for young people attempting to get a law degree now to make a career through the law than it was when I was younger.  Now law degrees cost much more than in the past, and the legal market is much more competitive. Therefore, an analysis of the costs and benefits makes sense.  It would be most helpful to know what area of law a young person wants to pursue and or what other skills or job experience a person can add to a law degree. One thing that is almost impossible to prepare for is the degree to which going to law school, any law school, will take over every aspect of life. It’s a major commitment.  So, think about what you will do with the degree when you finish. It may not work out the way you plan but even a bad plan has more chance of a serendipitous result than no plan.

Kaveh Miremadi: Be true to yourself and focus on an area of law that interests you.  Don’t let yourself be distracted by the people in law school who think there is only one path to success.  Identifying and then acting towards your true interests will help you succeed and find a satisfying career.

Edward Tayter: The best advice that I can give for deciding whether or not to go to law school is to really understand what the day-to-day work-life of an attorney is.  Very little of a lawyer’s work is correctly portrayed in popular media.  It’s extremely important to know what you are getting into, before committing three years of your life and tens of thousands of dollars of your money to a legal education.

April Cockerham: Do an internship or get a job in the legal field before you start and consider where you want to be after you graduate when choosing a law school. Often, the friends and connections you make while you’re a law student can be extremely important when you’re starting out as a new lawyer. If you’re really committed to ending up in a particular geographic region, it’s definitely something to take into consideration.

Peter Biberstein: Go work for a year or two before going back to school. Work experience will make you more a more marketable candidate, will give you a better perspective on life, and will provide a financial cushion for your future.

Terry Eaton: If I could go back and give my younger self some pre-law school advice it would be this: take your time, relax, breathe, and learn to smell the roses.  I spent way too much time in law school obsessing over grades and wondering if I was smart enough.  The zero sum game of cold calling on students in law school lectures and high stakes all-or-nothing final exams only breads the ultra-competitive law student behavior Scott Turrow famously characterized in his book One L.  It turns out that law school is not random and the people who study hard actually do make good grades.  I truly wish I had spent more time exercising, having a good diet, and spending time on the weekends with my family.  My law school grades were good and at graduation I had earned a federal clerkship followed by a job at a prestigious and big Washington, DC law firm.  Had I slowed down and enjoyed my experience more, I don’t think the outcome would have changed one bit. Mark Twain said it best: “I’ve been through some terrible things in life, some of which actually happened.”  My advice to future law students is to study hard, but take time out for yourself to enjoy life.  Believe me, you’ll be happy you did it.

Submitted by: Oliver Krischik

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