LSAT Update!

January, February, and April 2021 LSAT Exams will now be LSAT-Flex format…

Below, please see the details released today from LSAC regarding the January, February, and April 2021 LSAT Exams.

Given the continuing COVID-19 emergency, LSAC has made the decision to offer the online, remotely proctored LSAT-Flex for the last three test administrations in the current testing cycle, instead of the in-person tests previously scheduled. 

This means the January LSAT (U.S./Canada/International), the February LSAT (U.S./Canada only), and the April LSAT (U.S./Canada/International) will now be delivered in the LSAT-Flex format only. 

The LSAT-Flex gives candidates the opportunity to earn an LSAT score and continue their law school journeys despite COVID-19 restrictions on travel or public gatherings. Over the past six months, LSAC has taken an incremental approach to canceling the in-person LSATs one by one and replacing them with LSAT-Flex administrations, based on public health guidance. Given the ongoing disruption and uncertainty over how the COVID-19 situation will evolve, and feedback from candidates, the decision was made to provide clarity for the next six months, so that everyone can plan accordingly.

The January, February, and April LSAT-Flex administrations will begin on the same date as the previously announced in-person tests. Most test takers will test on Saturday or Sunday of that week, with some tests occurring later in the week based on test taker volumes or specific remote proctoring requirements. These LSAT-Flex administrations will count toward the annual, multi-year, and lifetime limits on taking the LSAT, and due to the demands of the LSAT-Flex administration, these will be undisclosed tests.

Learn more about the LSAT-Flex and see answers to frequently asked questions on the LSAC website. You can also learn more about deadlines for requesting formal accommodations, how to request assistance with a loaner device or a quiet place in which to test, deadlines for changing a test date, and score release dates for each of the LSAT-Flex administrations on our “Test Dates, Deadlines, and Score Release Dates” page.

What do test takers need to do?
        • Candidates currently registered for any of the January, February, or April 2021 in-person LSAT administrations may take the corresponding LSAT-Flex, or opt out by Friday, November 13, 2020, and receive a full refund. They should visit their LSAC account and submit the online form with their choice. If we do not hear from a test taker by November 13, they will be registered automatically for the LSAT-Flex corresponding to their current LSAT registration(s).  
        • LSAC is working to help every test taker in the U.S. (including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands) and Canada have the equipment and other resources they need to take the online, remotely proctored exam and do their best work. Any candidate who does not have the necessary equipment or an appropriate place to test should submit an online form in their LSAC account by the deadline for each administration (generally about 3-4 weeks before the onset of testing). For the first five administrations of the LSAT-Flex, LSAC shipped more than 1,500 free loaner devices to candidates who did not have a computer to take the online test, and guaranteed hotel reimbursements to hundreds more who needed reliable internet or a quiet place to test.
        • Because the LSAT-Flex is an online, remotely proctored test, LSAC is able to offer a variety of test start times for test takers to choose from. LSAC will continue to open the scheduling sign-up process about 10 days before the first day of testing for each of the LSAT-Flex administrations, so test takers can select the available time that works best for them. Test takers will receive more information and instructions prior to that time.
        • LSAC has created a new score preview option for first-time test takers who wish to see their score before deciding whether or not to keep it. The score preview option costs $45 for test takers who sign up by 11:59 p.m. ET on the day before the first day of testing for each LSAT-Flex administration, or $75 if test takers sign up after testing has concluded. You can see the exact score preview sign-up periods for the January and April 2021 test administrations at the “Test Dates, Deadlines, and Score Release Dates” page for each administration. First-time test takers who have an approved LSAT fee waiver will receive score preview free of charge. You can learn more about the score preview option here.
        • As a reminder, all test takers must have a completed LSAT Writing sample on file in order to see their score or have their score released to law schools. To help candidates complete the writing portion of their test, LSAC now opens LSAT Writing eight (8) days prior to every test administration. If a candidate already has a writing sample on file from a previous exam, they do not need to complete a new LSAT Writing sample. For more information about LSAT Writing, visit our website.

For more information, please visit LSAC.org

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Important Updates! Summer 2020 and Future LSAT Administration

Below please find important updates from LSAC regarding future and Summer 2020 LSAT offerings including adjustments to planned test dates, deadlines, administration format, and fees.

Summer 2020 Updates

Given the continued uncertainties and health risks related to the COVID-19 pandemic, we have made the decision to replace the in-person LSAT scheduled for July 13 in the U.S. and Canada with an LSAT-Flex administration, which would occur the week of July 12 with scores available on July 30. We have also extended the July test registration deadline to 11:59 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday, June 1, to allow additional time for candidates to register given the new testing dates and format.

In addition, the in-person paper-and-pencil International LSAT scheduled for June 27-28 will also be cancelled, and those international test takers will have the option of taking the LSAT-Flex during the week of July 12 as well.

As you may know, we recently delivered the first LSAT-Flex administration in the U.S. and Canada, which was generally quite successful. Nearly 10,000 candidates took the LSAT-Flex between May 18 and 22. While some test takers experienced technical difficulties with their computers, internet connection, or the proctoring process, 99% of test takers who started the test successfully completed it. We are using the experience of delivering the May exam to make future LSAT-Flex administrations even better.

Our next LSAT-Flex administration is scheduled for the week of June 14, so we will continue to learn and apply any lessons to the July LSAT-Flex administration.

2020-2021 Test Administration and Fees

LSAC has today opened up registration for all of the remaining tests in the 2020-2021 testing cycle. While it is too soon to predict how the ongoing COVID-19 emergency will affect the format or dates of these tests, we will continue doing everything we can to support our law school candidates and provide testing opportunities, while following public health guidance to help protect the safety of test takers and the broader community.

We also announced today that the prices for all LSAC services – testing, CAS, school reports, cancellation fees, and other services – will remain at their 2019-2020 levels. While the cost of providing many of these services continues to rise, LSAC is committed to closing the gap through greater efficiency in order to keep candidate costs as low as possible.

 

You can find more information about the LSAT-Flex at LSAT-Flex Frequently-Asked-Questions page, and more information about 2020-2021 registration and pricing at LSAC.org. If you want to familiarize yourself with the format and content of the LSAT-Flex, we recommend using the free Official LSAT Prep practice tests available on LSAC’s LawHub.

 

 

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What to do over Winter Break

Make your summer plans!

  • Apply for spring and summer 2020 internships! Check out our 2019 Internship/Jobs Newsletter over on our Compass page for over 30 pages of internship and job listings and other good ideas for pre-law opportunities. (Don’t wait until spring to look for summer internships–many will be filled by then.)
  • Apply for Summer 2020 pre-law programs. In addition to jobs and internships, we have provided information on several pre-law summer programs in our Jobs/Internships Newsletter.  These opportunities can be found in the Internship/Jobs Newsletter, starting on page 7.
  • Apply for Summer 2020 Study Abroad programs. Now is the time, as many summer study abroad program deadlines are in January/February. Program offerings include locations such as Milan, Barcelona and many others. Explore all available summer programs on the Study Abroad website.

Check out the LSAT Schedule!

Registrations for Spring 2020 LSAT administrations are open.  Go here for more info and to register.  The schedule for 2020-2021 LSAT Administrations, which begin with the June 2020 administration, should be posted in early January so keep checking LSAC.org for updates.

Also – don’t forget to mark your calendar for the PLAS LSAT Boot Camp, set for February 10!  Go here for more info.

Apply for scholarships!

  • Explore the Top Scholars website here–they offer lots of opportunities like these upcoming scholarships: UK Summer Fulbright, Boren, and Gilman scholarships.
  • Did you know that you can get a scholarship for writing one tweet? Or making a 2 minute video? Or being left-handed? Check out our 150+ Scholarship Spreadsheet–listing ALL kinds of scholarships, not just essays–over on our Compass page.

Update your professional and online presence!

  • Draft or update your resume to reflect what you accomplished this semester. These Career Center resources on drafting resumes can be helpful.
  • Create or update your LinkedIn profile
  • Create a professional-sounding email account (such as your full name, not jedimaster97 or hotmama23) if you are getting ready to apply for jobs, internships, scholarships, or graduate school
  • Clean up your social media/online presence. When you apply for jobs, internships, or graduate school, many people will Google you or review your social media sites, so make sure they are appropriate for those audiences. Take down anything questionable, un-tag yourself, and double check your privacy settings.

Informational Interviews. While you have some free time, take the opportunity to reach out to local lawyers and get some insight into legal careers. Ask if you can take them to coffee and chat about their careers.

  • How to find lawyers: Do your parents know any lawyers? Do you have any family members or family friends who are lawyers? They probably know even more lawyers to whom they can refer you for even more interviews. If you don’t know any lawyers and you live in Illinois, use the Illinois Lawyer Finder here, which allows you to search for lawyers by location and practice area around the state
  • For more details on how to conduct the interview use this Career Center resource.

Read up on legal issues and legal careers!

  • A great book providing insight into lots of different legal careers is 24 Hours with 24 Lawyers by Jasper Kim. 
  • Legal websites and blogs abound. Here are popular legal sites where you can learn about hot legal issues and about the legal profession.
    • SCOTUSblog for up-to-the-minute analyses of what the Supreme Court is hearing and doing
    • Law.com for a look inside the legal profession from various practice areas
    • LawProfessorBlogs.com Want to get a peek into the world of law professors and the topics they consider important? This site provides a directory of many different blogs by topic area and includes everything from Adoption Law to White Collar Crime and everything in-between.
    • Illinois State Bar Association’s website includes a blog and daily legal news about legal issues around the state. (You can find other state sites by searching, for example, “Texas” and state bar association.)

Listen to podcasts–there are tons of great legal podcasts out there, including these.

  • I Am the Law presents interviews with all different types of lawyers, from environmental lawyers to prosecutors to family law and corporate.
  • Serial provides an in depth view of the nuance and challenges of prosecuting crimes as each season analyzes one criminal case.
  • Women in the Law. This special short-term series explored issues of particular relevance to women in the profession.
  • The Girl’s Guide to Law School–Don’t be fooled by the name; this is not just for girls! This podcast is relevant for everyone interested in law school. With topics ranging from Will Law School Be a Disaster to Which Law School Should I Go To to explaining OCI (an interview process for law students) to Avoiding Disasters in Law School to how to read cases, this podcast truly has something for everyone.

If you are currently applying to law school:

  • Finish those applications. It is time to get them in!
  • Plan your law school visits–many schools have scheduled open houses or visit days in January and February. This may require pre-registration and some travel that you’ll want to plan in advance.
  • Follow your law schools on social media if you’d like to know when they are making decisions or scheduling open house/admitted student events.
  • Make a Pre-Law Advising appointment–If you have application questions or want some feedback on an essay, you can make a phone or Zoom appointment if you’re not in the area. Here is our appointment availability over winter break.
    • Appointments with a pre-law advisor are available through December 20.
    • The office will be closed December 24 through January 5, reopening on Jan. 6. (Staff will not be available during this time.)
    • Appointments will be available again January 6 through January 16.
    • Our regular schedule will resume with the Spring Semester on Tuesday, January 21.

 

 

 

 

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What to do over Fall Break

Fall Break is here — now what?

Aside from relaxing, eating, and watching football (and maybe getting ready for finals?!), what else could/should you be doing?

If You Are Taking the November LSAT

  1. Keep studying!  As you know, the test is NEXT Monday, November 25.
  2. Review the LSAC’s Test Center Requirements, which can be found here.
  3. Get plenty of rest and try to eat something before you head to the exam.
  4. Once the LSAT is over, take a day or so to recover, then….

If You Are Currently Applying to Law School

  1. If you are done with the LSAT, then finish your applications!  If you have everything you need to apply then there is no reason to procrastinate. This is a rolling admissions process — file your applications ASAP!
  2. If you are waiting on Letters of Recommendation, gently remind your recommenders  that you want to submit your applications ASAP but cannot do so until LSAC/CAS receives all required letters of recommendation. Ask them when they can complete your recommendation.
  3. If you are taking the January LSAT — keep studying!  A strong LSAT score helps both with admissions and scholarships! Set some goals for how many practice LSATs you can take over break and stick to it.
  4. Attend an Open House or schedule a visit with law schools. (If you’re scheduling a visit, make sure the school is open and staffed during Thanksgiving week!) Click here to revisit our November 13 Blog, which lists several law school Open Houses both within and outside of Illinois.  Before your visit, check out this piece on how to make a good impression on a law school dean
  5. Check deadlines for Early Decision!  While many schools list November 15 as their early decision deadline, several others allow early decision applications until December 1 or even Dec. 15.  Not sure about early decision? Click here for a PLAS blog post on the pros and cons of applying early decision.
  6. Complete your FAFSA.
  7. Did you know that you can already apply for scholarships sponsored by non-university sources? Take a look at the scholarship spreadsheet with over 150 options over on our Compass page–these have a variety of due dates and many are due by the end of the calendar year, so now is a great time to apply!

If You Are Not Yet Applying to Law School

  1. Study for finals and write those papers!  Your GPA is a very important part of the law school admissions and scholarship process!
  2. LSAT Prep. In general, we advise those planning to apply to law school next fall to take the June or July 2020 LSAT (unless study abroad prevents you from doing so). You should plan to spend approximately 4-6 months studying for the LSAT–so now is the time to prepare for that process. As you plan your schedule for Spring 2020, consider not overloading on courses since the time necessary for effective preparation equates to the time invested in a rigorous 3 credit class. Remember: the LSAT is NOT like the ACT or the SAT.  It does not test what you know.  Rather, it tests how you think.  It is important to determine how you plan to study for the LSAT (on your own, using the FREE Khan Academy Prep, through a commercial prep company, etc.), and decide where you want to take the LSAT. To begin your research, go to the LSAC’s website for info on the LSAT, how to register and select a test site, and how to be successful on the test. Note – PLAS will be holding the “LSAT Boot Camp” on Monday, February 10, 2020, featuring presentations by both the LSAC and Kaplan Commercial Test Prep! Keep checking back for more info as the event gets closer.
  3. Apply for Internships — Have you thought about what you will be doing next summer?  Are you looking into internships? Internships can be a great way to build transferrable skills or learn more about the practice of law.  Do you need some suggestions on how and where to find an internship?  Check out this Internship Plan from our blog.  And remember: the PLAS Annual Internship Newsletter will be out and published on Compass on December 9!
  4. Network and conduct informational interviews. A great way to start building your professional network and get to know various legal practice areas is to meet with lawyers! Do you or your parents know any lawyers? Are any of your friends’ parents lawyers? You can also use the alumni association directory to identify Illinois alumni who are lawyers. Ask a lawyer to spend 30 minutes doing an informational interview with you. Don’t be intimidated; this is an opportunity for you to buy him/her coffee and ask about their professional life. Here’s a resource for planning your informational interview. 
  5. Complete your FAFSA
  6. Apply for scholarships! We’ve included lots of scholarships for continuing undergraduate students. Take a look at the scholarship spreadsheet with over 150 options over on our Pre-Law Compass page–these have a variety of due dates and many are due by the end of the calendar year, so now is a great time to apply.

Have a great break!

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September and October LSAT Takers – The LSAT is over! Now what?

So the LSAT is behind you. Congratulations!  Now what?  Here is a checklist of items you should be working on to get those applications completed and submitted as soon as possible, with a target deadline of Fall Break.

  1. Complete the writing portion of the LSAT. You will not be able to submit your applications until you finish the writing section of the LSAT so hop on that ASAP!
  2. Register for the Credential Assembly Service if you haven’t already. This is the account where your letter of recommendation writers will send your letter–and they can’t write your letter until you set this up.  Click here for more information.
  3. Follow up with your recommenders. By now you should have already approached your letter of recommendation writers, but if not, now is the time. Provide a resume and allow at least 6-8 weeks for them to write and upload the letter to your CAS account.
  4. Order your transcript(s) now. Note: You will need to order a transcript from every undergraduate institution where you took courses–even summer courses–so now is a good time to reach out to the registrar of any community colleges or schools from which you transferred. Here is where you order your UIUC transcript. Want more information about the LSAC’s transcript policies? Go here.
  5. Write your personal statement. Not sure where to start? Sign up for our next Personal Statement and Resume Workshop, set for Tuesday, November 5, 4-5pm, Room 514 IUB. If you are unable to attend a workshop, we also provide a quick overview of the personal statement in our PLAS Handbook. Click on the “Applying to Law School” tab.  Once there, select the “Personal Statement” tab.  We have additional information in the “Applying to Law School” section of our PLAS Compass page. As both of these resources explain, each law school will have its own prompt(s) for the personal statement. While you may discover that many of these personal statement prompts are similar, you need to CAREFULLY REVIEW each prompt for each law school and reply to that prompt. Besides giving you a topic or direction to take, the prompt may also contain information about font size, page limits, etc. You need to open your CAS account and then begin to apply to each law school to see the details in each application. Note: just because you open an application today does NOT mean you have to finish it today. You can begin your law school applications and then go back and work on them at your own pace.  The law schools do NOT see anything until you actually submit your application.
  6. Research law schools. The very first thing to consider is: What are your top 3 priorities in a legal education? (Location, employment, affordability, and admissibility are common priorities.) You’ll want to develop a list of 8-10 law schools that meet those priorities. You can find LSAT/GPA data, employment information, tuition, and more by using a resource like the American Bar Association’s Required Disclosure reports. On this website you will find these reports:
    1. 509 Required Disclosures = Previous year’s incoming class data such as GPA, LSAT, ethnicity, number of applicants + admits, etc., plus you can find tuition, number and amount of scholarships awarded, and transfer data.
    2. Employment Outcomes = Law schools are required to report the employment status of graduates 10 months after graduation. Here you will see how many of the law schools’s most recent grads are employed, and in what sectors.
    3. Bar Passage Outcomes = Law schools must report bar passage data about a year out. This report will show which state bar exam this school’s grads take, how many pass, and comparisons to the general state pass rate.

If you have questions and would like to meet with an advisor, go here to schedule an appointment.

 

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September LSAT takers: Extended Nov LSAT deadline just for you

September LSAT results are in today. If you took the September LSAT and want to retake, the LSAC has extended the deadline for you to register for the November LSAT through TOMORROW–Tuesday, October 15. (This extension only applies for September LSAT takers…for everyone else, the deadline to register for the November LSAT was Oct. 10.)

You’ll need to make a quick decision, since the deadline is tomorrow. What should you know/consider about the November exam? Here’s an overview (taken from our Guide to Remaining 2019 LSATs).

November 25, 2019 LSAT Details

    • IF you are planning to apply to law school this cycle (to enter in Fall 2020), then this is the latest LSAT we advise taking. (Why? The next LSAT isn’t until January 2020, which is getting late in the cycle due to rolling admissions.)
    • This exam is on a Monday, but it’s also during our Fall Break, so current students won’t have to miss class. It may be necessary to miss work.
    • This LSAT is not offered on our campus, so takers should plan to travel elsewhere. Registering as early as possible will help secure a seat at a strategic location near campus or near home, if you want to avoid hotel expenses.
    • For current students–This exam is very close to finals, and LSAT prep will need to be carefully balanced with academic performance throughout the fall semester.
    • This exam is disclosed, meaning that test takers will receive a full report of questions answered correctly and incorrectly.

If you decide to retake, then:

  • Get back to LSAT studying right away. This test is six weeks out, and you’ll want to maximize that time in order to see improvement.
  • Review your score report carefully from the Sept. exam. What types of questions did you get wrong? Spend your time wisely on improving in those areas.
  • Explore a different LSAT prep resource than you used last time.
  • Make sure that you are timing yourself, taking full length practice tests, and taking a mix of paper and digital tests (as opposed to using only paper-based previous exams) to get used to the digital format.
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New Downloadable Pre-Law Calendar!!

Download the New Pre-Law Calendar!

Staying organized with school work and applying to law school can be a difficult challenge for many students. That is why we have created a Pre-Law Calendar for students to download that will remind you when to work on applying to law school! We have taken the stress off your shoulder and have offered answers to questions such as “when should I start my personal statement?” “when is the next LSAT exam?” and “when should I get my letter of recommendations?” All these answers and more will be available to you on the Pre-law Calendar.

The Pre-Law Calendar is available for ICal, Outlook, and Google Calendar. For students interested in using the google calendar format must follow the additional downloading steps below.

How to Convert ICal to Google Calendar

      1. On the left side go to “Other Calendars” and click on the drop down.
      2. Choose “Import calendar“.
      3. Click on “Choose file” and locate the .ics file on your computer.  A copy of the .ics file is below.  (https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/uiucprelaw%40gmail.com/public/basic.ics)     
      4. Click on “Import” and wait for Google to import your events.

Check out some snap shoots of  how the calendar works!

 

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Planning on Taking the LSAT in October or November (or even January)? REGISTER NOW!

Fall 2019 Test Takers: As we discussed in our August 14 PLAS blog post, the new format and schedule for the LSAT have significantly reduced the number of available slots for test takers.  Consequently, the stated registration deadlines of September 10 for the October LSAT and October 10 for the November LSAT are almost meaningless. In fact, as of today THERE ARE WAIT LISTS FOR SEVERAL TEST LOCATIONS FOR BOTH THE OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER EXAMS! If you plan to take the LSAT either in October or November (or possibly even January – see below), you need to register ASAP – do NOT wait until the registration deadline!!  Here is a link to the test center search portal to allow you to determine where there are still open spots for the exam. https://tcs.lsac.org/SearchCenter.aspx. Remember: the next LSAT administration here at UIUC isn’t until February so you need to consider the best time and location for you with that in mind.

July 2019 Test Takers: Scores were released last week.  You have until next Wednesday, September 4, to cancel your score.  After that, it remains in your LSAC/CAS account and all law schools to which you apply will see it. If you opt to cancel your score, you should be able to schedule your free retake through your LSAC/CAS account. As noted above, you should plan to register for your retake ASAP! Registration is now open for all administrations of the exam through April of 2020.   https://www.lsac.org/lsat/lsat-dates-deadlines-score-release-dates. If you encounter any issues with scheduling the free retake, contact LSAC directly at (215) 968-1001.

Some final thoughts/reminders:

(1) Given what we are seeing with wait lists for fall registrations, those of you considering the January LSAT should also register as soon as possible to make sure you get a seat! Do not wait until the December 3 deadline!!

(2) Applicants who took the LSAT in either June or July (and all future test takers), do not forget to complete the writing portion of the LSAT.  Your law school applications cannot be processed until the writing section is submitted!

(3) For more information about the latest developments concerning the LSAT, go to the LSAC’s website.  You can also search our blog by using the search tool in the upper left corner of this page as we have covered these topics in several previous posts.

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Register now for Oct & Nov LSATs

Important Fall LSAT Update: We are hearing that there are wait lists for many October and November LSAT locations already. If you plan to take either of those tests, then it is strongly suggested that you register ASAP to get a seat! Upcoming LSAT options are: Mon, Oct. 28, Mon, Nov. 25, and Mon, Jan. 13 (2020). You can search for available test sites near you for each upcoming LSAT here.

The LSAC is advising that you add yourself to a waitlist for your preferred location for the October or November exam, and they will try to place you at that location or nearby. (Note that wait lists do not guarantee that you will get a seat.)

Registration is open for all LSATs through April of 2020 on the LSAC website here. For a thorough discussion of all the pros and cons of each upcoming LSAT revisit our blog here–despite the title, that blog post is not just for July LSAT takers!

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5 Things To Do After the July LSAT

The July LSAT is over!  Whether you’re applying to law school this fall or in future years, here are your next steps.

  1. Consider LSAT retake options. This is the only LSAT administration that will allow you to see your score, cancel it, and sign up for a free retake.  For a full consideration of ALL upcoming LSAT options–including timing for this fall’s applicants–revisit this post. Even though you don’t yet have results, now is a good time to consider your retake options so that you are ready to register as soon as scores are released.
  2. Get your letters of recommendation lined up. Have you already contacted your LOR writers and asked them to submit a letter for you? If not, do that now, because giving your writer all summer to write the letter is smart. Recent grads: Go ahead and approach your professors now, even if you don’t plan to apply for another year or two…having them submit their letter while they still remember you (and work here) is smart. Don’t wait until a super busy time for them–or come back to find that they’re retired, on medical leave, etc.–to ask. Here are some tips on getting great recommendations.
  3. Register for the Credential Assembly Service if you haven’t already. This is the account where your recommenders will send your letter–and they can’t write your letter until you set this up.  Click here for more information.
  4. Order your transcript(s) now if you aren’t taking summer classes. If you are taking summer classes, put a reminder on your calendar to order your transcript after August 12 (or Aug. 27 if you are a summer 2019 graduate). Note: You will need to order a transcript from every undergraduate institution where you took courses–even summer courses–so now is a good time to reach out to the registrar of any community colleges or schools from which you transferred. Here is where you order your UIUC transcript.
  5. Research law schools. The very first thing to consider is: What are your top 3 priorities in a legal education? (Location, employment, affordability, and admissibility are common priorities.) You’ll want to develop a list of 8-10 law schools that meet those priorities. You can find LSAT/GPA data, employment information, tuition, and more by using a resource like the American Bar Association’s Required Disclosure reports. On this website you will find these reports:
    1. 509 Required Disclosures = Previous year’s incoming class data such as GPA, LSAT, ethnicity, number of applicants + admits, etc., plus you can find tuition, number and amount of scholarships awarded, and transfer data.
    2. Employment Outcomes = Law schools are required to report the employment status of graduates 10 months after graduation. Here you will see how many of the law schools’s most recent grads are employed, and in what sectors.
    3. Bar Passage Outcomes = Law schools must report bar passage data about a year out. This report will show which state bar exam this school’s grads take, how many pass, and comparisons to the general state pass rate.

If you’re finished with the LSAT (not retaking it), then now is a good time to work on drafting a personal statement. We’ll post more about that in a future blog, or you can take a look at our Pre-Law Handbook (click on the Applying to Law School tab, then Personal Statements) for details.

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