Sneak Peek of the New Digital LSAT!

Beginning in July 2019, the Law School Admission Council will transition to a complete digital version of the LSAT, the standardized test used by more than 99 percent of all law school applicants in the US. The digital test will be administered on tablets. This screenshot from the Logical Reasoning section shows a typical question and some of the features and benefits of the Digital LSAT.

Some new features and benefits of the Digital LSAT include letting users:

  • Highlight key information onscreen
  • Rule out answers
  • Monitor how much time is remaining
  • Resize the text based on their own needs
  • Move to unanswered questions with a single tap on the answer bar at the bottom of the screen.
    • Choosing an answer on the tablet automatically records the answer, eliminating the risk of accidentally filling in the wrong bubble in a separate answer sheet
  • Mark questions to come back to by flagging them on the answer bar at the bottom of the screen

IMPORTANT: The July LSAT will be the first LSAT to offer the digital version. Testing centers will be randomly chosen to have either the Digital or Paper exam. Students will have the opportunity to choose whether to keep their scores. If a student decides not to keep their score for the July LSAT, their score will be disregarded and will not be sent to any law schools. Additionally, the LSAC will offer students the opportunity to take a free LSAT in replacement of the July test.

If you have any questions about the digital LSAT, please follow this link to the LSAC website https://www.lsac.org/frequently-asked-questions-about-digital-lsat.

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Mark Your Calendar – Week of Oct 29

Harvard, NYU, and Yale Law School Online Webinars!

Harvard, NYU, and Yale Law School would like to invite to you to participate in their Online Information Sessions. Participants will have an opportunity to submit questions about the universities curriculum, student life, and the admissions process. Follow the link to register for these events.

NYU: https://nyu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3lY8HYIvDJhW9r7

  • Thursday, November 15 at 12:00 pm
  • Wednesday, December 5 at 3:00 pm
  • Thursday, January 10 at 12:00 pm

Harvard: https://hls.harvard.edu/dept/jdadmissions/connect-with-admissions-online-events/

Yale: https://law.yale.edu/admissions/jd-admissions/recruiting-schedule

Access Lex Institute Webinar: Financing Your Legal Education  Wednesday, November 7 at 3:00 p.m. ET

In this session, Access Lex will discuss the costs of pursuing a legal education, describe the financial aid application process, review the available financing options and identify ways your students can be financially prepared to achieve their goals.

Upcoming: Midwest VIRTUAL Law Fair on November 14! Were you unable to attend our Law School Fair? Over 25 Midwest law schools will be available to chat online with you about the admissions process, their schools, scholarships, journals, etc. This event is FREE and participants don’t need to travel! Click here for more information and to register. 

Pre-Law Club Event: Life of a Law Student and Beyond   

Thursday, November 1st, at 5:00 pm at the University of Illinois College of Law Room J (Dues Paying Members Only) 

Come hear from Professor Pahre of the UIUC College of Law speak about her experience as a law student, lawyer, and her personal area of study, among other topics. Pizza and drinks are provided at this event for due paying member only. Dues will be $15 and can be sent on Venmo to @uiucprelawclub. Upon reception of your dues, you will be added to our RSO roster and our official email list. RSVP to the event on November 1st here: https://goo.gl/forms/WpbAk3l0BHk3NZxF2 

Practice LSAT Opportunity 

The University of Illinois Pre-Law Honors Society and TestMasters will be administering a free full-length mock LSAT under official test conditions on Saturday, November 3rd from 10AM-2PM in Lincoln Hall, Room 1000. All UIUC students are welcome! Seating is limited: RSVP HERE!

Law School Open Houses

Some fall law school open house opportunities.  Make sure you check the websites of your selected schools for these very helpful events.

  • University of Chicago: Monday, October 29, from 1-5pm or Monday, November 19 (NOTE: That’s during Fall Break!), from 1-5pm.  Click here for more details.
  • Chicago-Kent: Saturday, November 10, 9:00am-12:30pm. Click here for more details.
  • DePaul University: Saturday, November 10 – 10:00 am-1:00 pm. Click here for more details. 
  • University of Illinois: You can schedule a visit, attend a class, and meet with faculty, students, and senior administrators to discover all that Illinois Law has to offer. If you are on campus, now is a great time to visit! Click here for more details.
  • John Marshall: Open House Saturday, November 3, 9am-12pm. Click here for more details.
  • Northern Illinois University: NIU Law offers Information Sessions at both their DeKalb location (12:00 pm Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) and in the Chicago Loop (on Tuesdays at 11:00 am). Click here for more details.
  • Northwestern University: Virtual tour available. In addition, student guided tours are offered Mondays and Fridays at 12:00 pm. In addition, class visits can be scheduled while classes are in session. Click here for more details.
  • Southern Illinois University: Visits can be scheduled Monday through Friday, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm. Click here to schedule a visit. There are opportunities to sit in on classes throughout the fall.

For more information about upcoming Open House Days and how to prepare for these visits, go here to our blog post from October 3.

Paid Summer Internship Opportunity: National Center for Supercomputing Applications

The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) is looking for highly motivated, creative students to work on hands-on research projects with guidance from NCSA staff and faculty affiliates. NCSA’s Students Pushing Innovation (SPIN) internship program will host the SPIN Open House on November 7 from 3-5pm in the NCSA atrium to promote the summer 2019 internship projects. The center will offer a limited number of paid SPIN (Students Pushing INnovation) internships during the
the Summer 2019 session. The SPIN projects are open to students in any major and any year of study; international students can apply.
For more info contact spin@illinois.edu or visit spin.ncsa.illinois.edu.

SPIN_2018OH_flyer

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Getting to know your professors: Now is the time!

My classes were all big lectures.

This is such a big place.

I never had the opportunity to talk with my professors one-on-one.

Attending a Big 10 school has many advantages, but often “small class sizes” is not one of them. Why is it critical for pre-law students to develop relationships with professors, and how can you go about it?

Whether you choose to apply to law school, graduate school, or job opportunities, you will need recommendations–and this is true throughout your lifetime. (If you ever intend to apply for a promotion or another job, you will again need references.) Building and maintaining these types of professional relationships is a skill you will use throughout your entire professional life.

As we focus on law school, though, as a general rule we suggest that law school applicants with less than 3 years of full-time postgraduate work experience provide two academic and one non-academic letter of recommendation. (Some law schools will require 1 or 2 letters but most schools will accept 3 to 4 letters.) Applicants who have 3+ years of post-graduation work experience might consider submitting two work and one academic letter, to emphasize the extent of your present work skills.

Academic letters are from professors or teaching assistants who have been in a position to assess your work in the classroom and compare you to other students. Non-academic letters can be from a work supervisor, internship supervisor, volunteer site supervisor, coach, or someone else who knows you well but is not a personal friend or family member, so they still have some objectivity.

You will need to get to know your professors (or TAs) in order to obtain those two academic letters. How can you do that even at a big place like Illinois?

  • Take the same professor/TA for multiple classes if you are able. This may require some advanced planning.
  • Go to office hours.  Many undergrads are terrified of office hours, because it sometimes feels as if you are taking up someone’s valuable time. However, most professors would welcome the opportunity to discuss course work, get to know their students, and talk about their discipline. Remember that they were once in your shoes too, and needed recommendations for graduate school. How can you approach the office hours visit to make it less stressful?
    • Read the current assignments and bring with you a few questions and/or observations about them.
      • What did you find most interesting or challenging?
      • Is there anything that confused you?
      • Have you drawn any connections between assignments that haven’t been discussed in class–or that you’d like to discuss more?
    • If you like, you can tell the professor that you are making an effort to get to know all of your professors this semester.
    • Ask the professor questions about his/her professional path, like:
      • What are you currently working on?
      • How did you find your passion for this material or discipline?
      • Why did you decide to assign this particular work over others?

You don’t have to make it lengthy–even a 15 minute chat helps to develop a connection and let the professor get to know you. Go a few times during the semester to develop a solid connection.

Non-academic recommenders, such as an internship or work supervisor, may not know how to go about writing a law school recommendation. How can you handle that situation?

  • Share the handout we posted over on our Compass page about letters of recommendation that lists the type of qualities and skills that law schools value.
  • Remind your recommender about the work that you’ve done, including any big projects, team contributions, written materials, or presentations that you created on the job.
  • Suggest skills that your recommender could write about–for example: I’m hoping you could include details about the website redesign that I completed.
  • Ask the recommender to highlight any especially relevant transferrable skills, such as: marketing, working with clients, resolving conflict, writing complex reports, giving presentations, facilitating financial transactions.

IF you are applying to law school this cycle, then NOW is the time to ask for those letters of recommendation so that you can complete your applications in November or early December.

 

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Mark Your Calendars–Week of October 22

PLAS Events

Pre-Law 101, TODAY, October 22, 4-5pm in 514 Illini Union Bookstore Building

This workshop is designed for incoming students who are new to pre-law or are interested in learning more about it. We will cover: What it means to be pre-law at Illinois, course selection, majors, and extracurriculars, building a pre-law resume, and what law schools are really looking for. We will outline a four year plan to maximize your undergraduate experiences in order to make a great law school candidate. We’ll also take any questions about law school and legal careers.

Each Pre-Law 101 session is the same, so pick the one that best suits your schedule. Incoming students should attend a Pre-Law 101 prior to setting up an individual pre-law advising appointment. Bring your questions!

Applying to Law School Webinar–Addenda: Character & Fitness and Optional Essays, Friday, Oct. 26 at 2:00 pm. During this webinar, we will discuss:

  • What Character & Fitness questions are
  • How to draft responses to required disclosures
  • Tips for keeping required disclosures professional
  • How to maximize an optional essay without recycling the personal statement
  • Considerations for when an optional statement should–and shouldn’t–be submitted

Register here for this webinar by October 24. Webinar link and handouts will be sent to registrants before the session.

College of Law Events–ALL are invited to attend!

Illinois Supreme Court Justice Mary Jane Theis to present Dean’s Public Engagement Lecture–Oct. 25, 12pm-1pm, Max L. Rowe Auditorium in the Law Building. The Dean’s Public Engagement Lecure Series aims to increase integration between the legal academy, the legal and business professions, and the public. Hosted by Dean Vikram David Amar, the lecture series brings thought leaders, including distinguished judges, lawyers, and businesspersons to the College of Law to talk on cutting-edge issues affecting law, justice, business, and government.Lecture is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided for lecture attendees.

Upcoming: Midwest VIRTUAL Law Fair on November 14! Were you unable to attend our Law School Fair? Over 25 Midwest law schools will be available to chat online with you about the admissions process, their schools, scholarships, journals, etc. This event is FREE and participants don’t need to travel! Click here for more information and to register. 

Career Center EventsClick here to visit the Career Center’s website for more information or to register for these sessions.

  • Global Careers: Singapore — Oct. 25, 6-8pm Interview Suite Room 213
  • Well-O-Ween–Oct. 23, 4-7 pm at the ARC
  • Resume/Cover Letter/Linked In Reviews
    • Oct.22 , 2-4:30 pm TCC Resource Center; 5-7:30pm Ikenberry Commons
    • Oct. 23, 2-4:30pm TCC Resource Center; 5-7:30pm BrewLab Coffee Shop
    • Oct. 24, 2-4:30pm TCC Resource Center, 5-7:30pm BrewLab Coffee Shop
    • Oct. 26, 2-4:30pm TCC Resource Center, 5-7:30 Ikenberry Commons

Law School Open Houses

Some fall law school open house opportunities, including one this past weekend at Chicago-Kent, have already passed.  Make sure you check the websites of your selected schools for these very helpful events.

  • University of Chicago: Monday, October 29, from 1-5pm or Monday, November 19 (NOTE: That’s during Fall Break!), from 1-5pm.  Click here for more details.
  • Chicago-Kent: Saturday, November 10, 9:00am-12:30pm. Click here for more details.
  • DePaul University: Saturday, November 10 – 10:00 am-1:00 pm. Click here for more details. 
  • University of Illinois: You can schedule a visit, attend a class, and meet with faculty, students, and senior administrators to discover all that Illinois Law has to offer. If you are on campus, now is a great time to visit! Click here for more details.
  • John Marshall: Open House Saturday, November 3, 9am-12pm. Click here for more details.
  • Loyola-Chicago: Information Sessions are offered TODAY Monday, October 15 at 11:15 am; Monday, November 19 (Note: That’s during Fall Break!) at 11:15 am; or Friday, November 30 at 12:15 pm. Click here fore more details.
  • Northern Illinois University: NIU Law offers Information Sessions at both their DeKalb location (12:00 pm Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) and in the Chicago Loop (on Tuesdays at 11:00 am). Click here for more details.
  • Northwestern University: Virtual tour available. In addition, student guided tours are offered Mondays and Fridays at 12:00 pm. In addition, class visits can be scheduled while classes are in session. Click here for more details.
  • Southern Illinois University: Visits can be scheduled Monday through Friday, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm. Click here to schedule a visit. There are opportunities to sit in on classes throughout the fall.

For more information about upcoming Open House Days and how to prepare for these visits, go here to our blog post from October 3.

Scholarships and Other Campus Opportunities

Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship

Campus Deadline: November 26, 2018

The Goldwater is for juniors or exceptional sophomores who are current U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or resident aliens. The Goldwater awards one- or two-year $7,500 awards to students who demonstrate strong evidence of contributing to the technological advances of the U.S. Applicants should be committed to pursuing a Ph.D in the research fields of mathematics, sciences, or engineering.

 

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Spring 2019 Course Options for Pre-Law Students

Spring 2019 Registration Time Tickets – Available to View Starting Monday, October 22!

Registration is almost here.  And every semester around this time, our office hears from students asking for course suggestions.  As you know, students in ANY major can attend law school, and there are NO specifically required courses for pre-law undergrads. Law schools do not require any particular major or coursework. However, given an interest in law, here are some spring courses that pre-law students may find particularly helpful and interesting. These courses are only suggestions and are NOT requirements. For some additional information about course planning, go here to check out an earlier blog post with some good tips about planning your schedule.

Some of these courses have prerequisites;  check Course Explorer and speak to your academic advisor about the best courses for you.

ACE 240: Personal Financial Planning. Understanding financial instruments, records, and tax implications is critical for nearly all lawyers.

ADV 310: Intro to Public Relations  Introduces the student to the practice and profession of public relations. Course material covers topics such as the history of public relations, the role of law and ethics in public relations, and theories that guide public relations research and practice. 

BTW 263: Writing in the Disciplines teaches very practical writing skills for aspiring professionals.

Community Health 101: Introduction to Public Health is a good option for those interested in pursuing healthcare law. (See posted restrictions.)

Communication courses are helpful, as all lawyers must demonstrate strong oral and written communication skills. Here are some examples of helpful courses:

  • CMN 101: Public Speaking (this is a prereq for most upper level CMN courses)
  • CMN 211: Business Communication
  • CMN 220: Communicating Public Policy
  • CMN 321: Strategies of Persuasion
  • CMN 323: Argumentation

ECON 484: Law and Economics Applications of economic theory to problems and issues in both civil and criminal law and the effect of legal rules on the allocation of resources; includes property rights, liability and negligence assignment, the use of administrative and common law to mitigate market failure, and the logic of private versus public law enforcement. 

ENGL 310: Introduction to the Study of the English Language

Topics include the study of the English language, with emphasis on one or more of the following: the social, political, historical, technological, legal, and economic aspects of language use.

ENGL 360: Environmental Writing for students interested in environmental law.

GWS 475: Queering Legal Cultures  Exploration of the many forms of address that legal language can take, and how these legal forms affect subjects who are barely legible before the law. We will look at state laws, supreme-court decisions, policy publications, literature and social commentaries, fictional texts – as mobbed through social media platforms – to try to understand how queer (as verb, noun, adjective) emerges as a way in and out of legal spaces. Topics will include historical formations, current debates, and landmark cases in both national and transnational contexts. 

HDFS 120: Intro to Family Studies and SOCW 200: Intro to Social Work. Both of these courses may be of interest to students who want to be advocates for families and juveniles.

INFO 303: Writing Across Media, a skill that all legal careers integrate and value.

LAW 199:The Justice System.  This class explores the operation of the United States Criminal Justice System.  In addition, this course reviews the history of the criminal justice system, the people who work in it, the citizens who are processed through it, and the legacy of good and bad outcomes it has delivered through the years. The learning is accomplished by reading an excellent textbook, and more importantly, by observing court and talking with judges, prosecutors, and defense attorneys.  Thus, students have the opportunity to learn from people who have served the justice system for many years.  Admission is by application only, as there are only twelve spots (this number is dictated by our transportation arrangements).

If you would like to apply, please send an email to Professor Pahre at jpahre@illinois.edu by midnight on October 20th with the following information:

1. Your full name and address;

2. Why this course interests you;

3. What you hope to learn during the spring semester; and

4. How you will manage your schedule so that you will be available Tuesday afternoons for our class meetings and field trips.

Professor Pahre will make decisions by November 1st, and offer spots to twelve students. The remaining students will be on a wait-list.  Any student who accepts the offer of placement will be enrolled.  If any student declines, or later withdraws, she will offer the placement to the next student on the wait-list.

Law 302: Transitional Justice Wrongdoing is part of the history of many, if not most, political communities around the globe. This course examines the moral questions that dealing with past wrongdoing raise. Our focus is specifically on political wrongdoing, that is, wrongdoing inflicted on individuals by the state or groups contesting the state. Such wrongdoing has taken different forms, from slavery, to forced disappearances, to programs of torture and of land appropriation. We also focus on two specific political contexts: the United States and South Africa. In this course, we survey a range of legal measures including criminal punishment, truth commissions, reparations, and apology, that have been, and can be used, to deal with legacies of wrongdoing.

Law 303: Living the Law This course first applies the legal understanding developed in LAW 301 to situations in the real world, and then explores how the law is viewed through different social science lenses. Students interested in deepening their knowledge of how the law operates in today’s world, and how the law is studied in the social sciences will benefit from this class. Prerequisite: Law 301.

NRES 102: Intro to Natural Resources and Environmental Science would be a helpful course for students interested in pursuing environmental law.

Philosophy options include:

  • PHIL 102: Logic & Reasoning. Especially helpful for students who have yet to take the LSAT, as two sections of the LSAT are based on Logical Reasoning.
  • PHIL 104/105: Intro to Ethics.  Basic exploration of ethics, including the relationship between social morality and the law.
  • PHIL 107: Intro to Political Philosophy. Introduction to core ideas in political and legal philosophy, for example, rights, equality, political obligations, legitimacy of states, nationalism, and oppression.

Political Science options to gain a foundational understanding of our legal system and its role within broader political structures include:

  • PS 220/321: Intro to Public Policy/Principles of Public Policy
  • PS 280: Intro to International Relations
  • PS 301: US Constitution I is a helpful primer for law school
  • PS 313: Congress and Foreign Policy
  • PS 386: International Law
  • PS 399: Politics of International Treaties

PS 491: Internship with the Champaign County Public Defender’s Office

Are you interested in how criminal courts work?  Would you like to see an arraignment, a motion hearing or a real criminal trial?  Want to meet with Public Defender clients about their cases?  Would you like to help an attorney prepare cases for court?  The Department of Political Science and the Champaign County Public Defender’s Office plan to offer an internship for academic credit in Spring, 2019.   Jamie Thomas-Ward, the Director of Pre-Law Services, will provide academic supervision of these internships. Unlike other internships that require a substantial research project done in conjunction with the internship itself for an award of academic credit, in this internship, students will be awarded credit for their work in the Public Defender’s Office combined with a series of structured academic assignments requiring integration of internship experiences with readings on the political systems, the legal system and constitutional and human rights. This class requires one hour of class time per week, and about six hours per week of work at the internship site. Admission is competitive: We expect to have five openings for Spring, 2019.

By Thursday, November 1, students seeking to participate in the Public Defender Internship Program must submit an application online at https://forms.illinois.edu/sec/2726999. The application consists of a cover letter, informal transcript, resume and writing sample. The cover letter should address each of the following elements: 1) explain your interest in and motivation for undertaking this internship, 2) share your experience in working with only a modest level of direct supervision, and 3) discuss your plans for accommodating participation in the internship in your schedule (including how many other credit hours you plan to carry, whether you will be studying for the LSAT, whether you have other significant time commitments).  All of those materials will be reviewed for a decision on acceptance into the program by the departmental internship committee. 

At a minimum, students seeking to participate in this program need (1) to have completed 45 credit hours by Spring, 2019 (2) with at least one year of residence on this campus and (3) to have earned a cumulative UIUC grade point average of 3.0 or higher.  They must (4) have completed PS 101: U.S. Government & Politics and (5) have no arrests or criminal convictions – as an adult or juvenile – or serious campus disciplinary violations involving campus or local law enforcement.  In addition to working in the courthouse, students will need to attend a class for one hour per week on Wednesday afternoons.  Submit all applications online at https://forms.illinois.edu/sec/2726999.

Past students have really enjoyed this opportunity.  Questions on this internship?  Contact Jamie Thomas-Ward at thomas99@illinois.edu.

PSYC 341: Advanced Community Projects. Gaining experience with clients in a human services context can build client-related skills as well as introducing students to the legal needs of a community or a specific population.

Sociology has a Criminology, Law and Society minor. These courses may be helpful for students exploring criminal legal issues and crime in society, such as:

  • SOC 378: Sociology of Law
  • SOC 479: Law and Society

Other courses to explore different areas of law include the following. Some have restrictions; check Course Explorer.

  • ACE 403: Agricultural Law
  • GEOG 210: Social & Environmental Issues
  • JOUR 311: Media Law
  • LER 120: Contemporary Labor Problems
  • REL 480: Islamic Law
  • RST 354: Legal Aspects of Sport
  • SE 400 Engineering Law (only pre-req is RHET 105)

Business classes can provide a helpful foundation for those interested in corporate careers, however, most are restricted to College of Business majors or minors. Some courses will release any leftover seats after a restricted period; check Course Explorer for more details.

  • BADM 300 Legal Environment of Business
  • BADM 303 Principles of Public Policy–also cross-listed as PS 321.
  • BADM 314 Leading Negotiations
  • BADM 447 Legal Strategies for Entrepreneurial Firms

Remember that these are only suggestionsFurther, this is not intended to be an exhaustive list. There are many other great courses described in the Course Explorer, some of which have prerequisites but are still open to undergrads. Do your own research and talk with your academic advisor to identify other good options.

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Mark Your Calendars – Week of October 15, 2018

PLAS Events

GRE v. LSAT for Law School Admissions: TODAY, October 15, 4-5pm, 1002 Lincoln Hall

A hot topic in legal education is the recent decision by several law schools to accept a GRE or LSAT score. What should prospective law students know about the GRE versus the LSAT? Join us as Ms. Jennifer Kott, Director of Admissions at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, shares details about how her office uses the GRE in the law school admission process. This session will cover:

  • Why the GRE is now being accepted by law schools
  • How the GRE differs from the LSAT
  • How law school admissions staff evaluate GRE scores versus LSAT scores
  • Advice on how to decide which exam to take; and
  • Communicating with law school admissions offices.

Click here for more information on the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law.

Build Your Law School Application Plan: Part of the Applying to Law School Webinar Series – THIS FRIDAY, October 19, 2-3pm

This is part of our Applying to Law School webinar series for Illinois students and alumni.

During this webinar, we will discuss:

  • How to create a law school application strategy
  • Building a list of realistic and dream law schools
  • Assessing your priorities in a legal education
  • Research strategies for finding law schools that are a good fit
  • Budgeting for the application process
  • Creating an effective timeline to maximize admission and scholarship results

Bring your questions!

Register for this webinar by TOMORROW, October 16. Webinar link and handouts will be sent to registrants before the session.

Pre-Law 101 – Next Monday, October 22, 4-5pm, 514 IUB

This workshop is designed for incoming students who are new to pre-law or are interested in learning more about it. We will cover: What it means to be pre-law at Illinois, course selection, majors, and extracurriculars, building a pre-law resume, and what law schools are really looking for. We will outline a four year plan to maximize your undergraduate experiences in order to make a great law school candidate. We’ll also take any questions about law school and legal careers. Click here to register for this event.

Each Pre-Law 101 session is the same, so pick the one that best suits your schedule. Incoming students should attend a Pre-Law 101 prior to setting up an individual pre-law advising appointment. Registration will be open until October 19 or until the session is full.  Go here to register.

 

Upcoming: Midwest VIRTUAL Law Fair on November 14! Were you unable to attend our Law School Fair? Over 25 Midwest law schools will be available to chat online with you about the admissions process, their schools, scholarships, journals, etc. This event is FREE and participants don’t need to travel! Click here for more information and to register. 

Career Center EventsClick here to visit the Career Center’s website for more information or to register for these sessions.

  • Finding and Applying to Federal Government Jobs — Oct. 15, 4-5pm TCC Room 143
  • Graduate and Professional School Fair — Oct. 17, 11am-4pm, Illini Union A, B, C and Pine Lounge
  • International Career Festival — Oct. 20, 1-5:30pm, SDRP, 2nd Floor
  • Resume/Cover Letter/Linked In Reviews
    • Oct.15 , 2-4:30 pm TCC Resource Center; 5-7:30pm Ikenberry Commons
    • Oct. 16, 2-4:30pm TCC Resource Center; 5-7:30pm BrewLab Coffee Shop
    • Oct. 17, 2-4:30pm TCC Resource Center, 5-7:30pm BrewLab Coffee Shop
    • Oct. 18, 2-4:30pm TCC Resource Center
    • Oct. 19, 2-4:30pm TCC Resource Center
    • Oct. 21, 5-7:30pm, Ikenberry Commons

Law School Open Houses

Some fall law school open house opportunities, including one this past weekend at Chicago-Kent, have already passed.  Make sure you check the websites of your selected schools for these very helpful events.

  • University of Chicago: Monday, October 29, from 1-5pm or Monday, November 19 (NOTE: That’s during Fall Break!), from 1-5pm.  Click here for more details.
  • Chicago-Kent: Saturday, November 10, 9:00am-12:30pm. Click here for more details.
  • DePaul University: Saturday, November 10 – 10:00 am-1:00 pm. Click here for more details. 
  • University of Illinois: You can schedule a visit, attend a class, and meet with faculty, students, and senior administrators to discover all that Illinois Law has to offer. If you are on campus, now is a great time to visit! Click here for more details.
  • John Marshall: Open House Saturday, November 3, 9am-12pm. Click here for more details.
  • Loyola-Chicago: Information Sessions are offered TODAY Monday, October 15 at 11:15 am; Monday, November 19 (Note: That’s during Fall Break!) at 11:15 am; or Friday, November 30 at 12:15 pm. Click here fore more details.
  • Northern Illinois University: NIU Law offers Information Sessions at both their DeKalb location (12:00 pm Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) and in the Chicago Loop (on Tuesdays at 11:00 am). Click here for more details.
  • Northwestern University: Virtual tour available. In addition, student guided tours are offered Mondays and Fridays at 12:00 pm. In addition, class visits can be scheduled while classes are in session. Click here for more details.
  • Southern Illinois University: Visits can be scheduled Monday through Friday, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm. Click here to schedule a visit. There are opportunities to sit in on classes throughout the fall.

For more information about upcoming Open House Days and how to prepare for these visits, go here to our blog post from October 3.

Scholarships and Other Campus Opportunities

Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship

Campus Deadline: November 26, 2018

The Goldwater is for juniors or exceptional sophomores who are current U.S. citizens, U.S. nationals, or resident aliens. The Goldwater awards one- or two-year $7,500 awards to students who demonstrate strong evidence of contributing to the technological advances of the U.S. Applicants should be committed to pursuing a Ph.D in the research fields of mathematics, sciences, or engineering.

Goldwater Information Session: Oct. 18, 3:30-4:30pm, 514 IUB

Goldwater Scholarship Workshop: Oct. 19, 3:00-4:00pm, 514 IUB

Interested in other scholarships? PLAS has collected information on over 200 scholarships–for both undergrads and incoming law students–on our Scholarships Spreadsheet over on our Pre-Law Compass page. It’s a wide variety of scholarships based on everything from being left-handed to making a video to tweeting, and deadlines vary, so check it out!

The Social Justice Educators Paraprofessional Program – Final Info Session is Thursday, October 18, 6:30-7:30pm Gregory Hall Room 205
Do you want to…Serve as a peer leader on campus?Expand your knowledge about social identities and inclusivity?Design fun and engaging educational opportunities for your peers?Develop public speaking and interpersonal communication skills?If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this is the leadership opportunity for you! Become a social justice educator paraprofessional! For more information on how to apply, visit https://go.illinois.edu/SJEPapplication or attend the final information session: Gregory Hall Room 205 October 18th 6:30 – 7:30 pm
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Planning For Study Abroad & Illinois in Washington

Important Things to Consider for the Pre-Law Student Studying Abroad in 2019

Studying Abroad in 2019? Think ahead for which test you want to take!

A note about the LSAT and Study Abroad: Many students choose to study abroad in the
spring of their Junior year. This can impact your planning and preparation for the LSAT,
especially if you plan to take the exam in March or June.

You should factor in your study abroad timing when deciding which LSAT to take. The LSAT is offered in many other countries (which you can investigate at www.lsac.org), but you should carefully consider whether you will have the time and focus necessary for preparing for the exam while abroad.

See our handbook for more information about the application process.

Illinois in Washington Program (Summer 2019 Session) 

Illinois in Washington (IIW) is an academic internship program open to all U of I undergraduates. Participants live and intern in Washington, DC, while taking U of I classes.  IIW offers an exceptional opportunity to gain rewarding work experience while enjoying the political, intellectual, and cultural experiences than only the nation’s capital can offer.

Student internships have included positions with members of Congress, think tanks, consulting groups, social justice organizations, and government agencies.  Come and join us for an unforgettable semester in one of the most exciting cities in the world.  Our information session will provide a brief overview of the program.  The application deadline for the Summer 2019 term is February 1st.  Application instructions are available at http://www.washington.illinois.edu/apply/information/.

Pre-Law Events

GRE v. LSAT for Law School Admissions Monday, October 15, 2018 from 4:00 – 5:00 pm Lincoln Hall 1002

A hot topic in legal education is the recent decision by several law schools to accept a GRE or LSAT score. What should prospective law students know about the GRE versus the LSAT? Join us as Ms. Jennifer Kott, Director of Admissions at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, shares details about how her offices uses the GRE in the law school admission process. This session will cover:

  • Why the GRE is now being accepted by law schools
  • How the GRE differs from the LSAT
  • How law school admissions staff evaluate GRE scores versus LSAT scores
  • Advice on how to decide which exam to take; and
  • Communicating with law school admissions offices.

Click here for more information on the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law.

Build Your Law School Application Plan: Part of the Applying to Law School Webinar Series Friday, October 19, 2018 from 2:00 – 3:00 pm Online Webinar

This is part of our Applying to Law School webinar series for Illinois students and alumni.During this webinar, we will discuss:

  • How to create a law school application strategy
  • Building a list of realistic and dream law schools
  • Assessing your priorities in a legal education
  • Research strategies for finding law schools that are a good fit
  • Budgeting for the application process
  • Creating an effective timeline to maximize admission and scholarship results

Bring your questions!

Register for this webinar by October 16 at this link https://forms.illinois.edu/sec/766132. Webinar link and handouts will be sent to registrants before the session.

Scholarship Opportunity (Graduate Students Only)

The Celia M. Howard Fellowship program was established by the Illinois Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs in 1948.  Its purpose was to give financial assistance to train well-qualified, mature Illinois women for study in the field of Diplomacy.  This Fellowship has since been expanded to include study in International Management, Law, and Administration of Justice. Since 1950, over 150 women have received financial assistance from this fellowship.  The total amount and number of awards varies annually.

To qualify for the scholarship, you must:

  1. Attend one of the eligible programs;
    1. University of Illinois College of Law – Champaign, Illinois (Juris Doctor)
    2. The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy – Medford, Massachusetts (Master of Arts and Diplomacy Degree)
    3. Garvin School of International Management – Glendale, Arizona (Master of International Management)
    4.  Paul Simon Public Policy Institute – Carbondale, IL
  2. Have been a resident of Illinois at some time for a period of at least two years;
  3. Have received A.B., B.A., B.S. or equivalent baccalaureate degree;
  4. Have at least 12 undergraduate hours in History, Economics or Political Science;
  5. Have an undergraduate GPA of B or better.

Click this link to fill out an application https://celiamhoward.wildapricot.org/Qualifications. Application deadline is due November 15th and awards are announced by April 1st.

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Mark Your Calendar – Week of October 8

Pre-Law Events

GRE v. LSAT for Law School Admissions Monday, October 15, 2018 from 4:00 – 5:00 pm Lincoln Hall 1002

A hot topic in legal education is the recent decision by several law schools to accept a GRE or LSAT score. What should prospective law students know about the GRE versus the LSAT? Join us as Ms. Jennifer Kott, Director of Admissions at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law, shares details about how her offices uses the GRE in the law school admission process. This session will cover:

  • Why the GRE is now being accepted by law schools
  • How the GRE differs from the LSAT
  • How law school admissions staff evaluate GRE scores versus LSAT scores
  • Advice on how to decide which exam to take; and
  • Communicating with law school admissions offices.

Click here for more information on the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law.

Build Your Law School Application Plan: Part of the Applying to Law School Webinar Series Friday, October 19, 2018 from 2:00 – 3:00 pm Online Webinar

This is part of our Applying to Law School webinar series for Illinois students and alumni.During this webinar, we will discuss:

  • How to create a law school application strategy
  • Building a list of realistic and dream law schools
  • Assessing your priorities in a legal education
  • Research strategies for finding law schools that are a good fit
  • Budgeting for the application process
  • Creating an effective timeline to maximize admission and scholarship results

Bring your questions!

Register for this webinar by October 16 at this link https://forms.illinois.edu/sec/766132. Webinar link and handouts will be sent to registrants before the session.

Upcoming: Midwest VIRTUAL Law Fair on November 14! Were you unable to attned our Law School Fair? Over 25 midwest law schools will be available to chat online with you about the admissions process, their schools, scholarships, journals, etc. This event is FREE and participants don’t need to travel! Click here for more information and to register. 

Graduate and Professional School Fair Wednesday, October 17, from 11:00 am – 4:00 pm at the Illini Union ABC & Pine Lounge

Exploring options after graduation? Speak with admission representatives from 100+ programs about graduate school and health profession programs.
Wednesday

Career Center EventsClick here to visit the Career Center’s website for more information or to register for these sessions.

Scholarships

THE ILLINOIS CLUB SCHOLARSHIPS: Application Deadline October 13!

Diverse and welcoming, The Illinois Club draws its membership from all areas of the University as well as the surrounding community. Since 1915, The Illinois Club has provided financial support to worthy undergraduate students. This year, we will be giving out the following scholarships:

  • Make-A-Difference Awards of $3,000
  • A Global Focus Award of $3,000
  • A Humanities Award of $3,000
  • Isabelle Purnell Education Awards of $3,000 • The Judith Life Ikenberry Fine Arts Award of $5,500

General Eligibility: You must be an undergraduate, have earned at least 60 credit hours by the beginning of the Spring 2019 semester, and graduate no earlier than December 2019 to apply. A minimum GPA of 2.75 at both the time of application and winning of award is also required.

For more information about the individual awards, go to http://go.illinois.edu/TICScholarship.

Interested in more scholarships? PLAS has collected information on over 200 scholarships–for both undergrads and incoming law students–on our Scholarships Spreadsheet over on our Pre-Law Compass page. It’s a wide variety of scholarships based on everything from being left-handed to making a video to tweeting, and deadlines vary, so check it out!

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Breaking news: Digital LSAT and schedule changes in 2019

Breaking news from the LSAC: The LSAT is transitioning to digital in 2019. Today the LSAC issued a press release about their plans to transition from a paper & pencil LSAT format to a tablet-based digital format.

For the July 2019 LSAT, some test takers will be assigned the (current) paper & pencil format while others will be assigned to the tablet-based digital format.

Every subsequent LSAT (September 2019 and beyond) will only be offered on the tablet-based digital platform. 

Remaining paper & pencil LSAT exams are:

Saturday, November 17, 2018 (Registration is open until Monday, Oct. 8 here)
Saturday, January 26, 2019 (Registration is currently open here)
Saturday, March 30, 2019 (Registration will open in December)
Monday, June 3, 2019 (Registration will open in December or later)

If it is important to you to take the paper & pencil format, then we strongly advise registering early for one of these LSATs in order to guarantee your spot.

The LSAT schedule is also changing. The LSAC has announced the following dates for 2019-2020. Registration for these exams will begin in December 2018.

2019 LSAT Dates
Saturday, January 26, 2019 (Registration is already open; see above)
Saturday, March 30, 2019
Monday, June 3, 2019 12:30 p.m.
Monday, July 15, 2019 12:30 p.m.
Saturday, September 21, 2019 8:30 a.m.
Monday, October 28, 2019 12:30 p.m.
Saturday, November 23, 2019 8:30 a.m.

These 2020 LSAT Dates have also been announced:
Monday, January 13, 2020 12:30 p.m.
Saturday, February 22, 2020 8:30 a.m.
Monday, March 3 , 2020 12:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 25, 2020 8:30 a.m.

Stay tuned for additional updates as the LSAC issues further details.

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Law School Open Houses

Now is the time to schedule law school visits and register for open house events!

Open House/Tour Info for Illinois Law Schools–Fall 2018

Some schools schedule formal open houses and others require you to choose a date for a visit. Open houses are a great opportunity to visit the campus, make a strong first impression, sit in on the class, see what the students and professors are like, and a great opportunity to answer all your questions. Here are some options for visits and open houses for Illinois law schools:

  • University of Chicago: Monday, October 29, from 1-5pm or Monday, November 19 (NOTE: That’s during Fall Break!), from 1-5pm.  Click here for more details.
  • Chicago-Kent: October Admissions Workshop Saturday, October 13, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Click here for more details.
  • DePaul University: Saturday, November 10 – 10:00 am-1:00 pm. Click here for more details. 
  • University of Illinois: You can schedule a visit, attend a class, and meet with faculty, students, and senior administrators to discover all that Illinois Law has to offer. If you are on campus, now is a great time to visit! Click here for more details.
  • John Marshall: Open House Saturday, November 3, 9am-12pm. Click here for more details.
  • Loyola-Chicago: Information Sessions are offered Monday, October 15 at 11:15 am, Monday, November 19 (Note: That’s during Fall Break!) at 11:15 am, or Friday, November 30 at 12:15 pm. Click here fore more details.
  • Northern Illinois University: NIU Law offers Information Sessions at both their DeKalb location (12:00 pm Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays) and in the Chicago Loop (on Tuesdays at 11:00 am). Click here for more details.
  • Northwestern University: Virtual tour available. In addition, student guided tours are offered Mondays and Fridays at 12:00 pm. IN addition, class visits can be scheduled while classes are in session. Click here for more details.
  • Southern Illinois University: Visits can be scheduled Monday through Friday, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm. Click here to schedule a visit. There are opportunities to sit in on classes throughout the fall.

3 Things To Do for a Law School Visit or Open House

Once you decide to attend a law school open house or tour, here are a few things you should do.

  1. REGISTER! Make you are following the school’s directions and reserve a spot for the open house or tour.
  2. Dress professionally for the event. Likely the open houses will have a business casual dress code. We recommend business formal (such as a suit or shirt and tie) even if the law students are more casual because you want to make a good first impression.
  3. Read the website and be familiar with the time, date, where to park, and what to bring to the event. Write down any questions you have so you can ask them on the tour or during the visit. Do NOT be late–allow for extra time for parking and finding the admissions office.

Also, research schools that you are considering out of state. Most schools offer open houses throughout the year and regular tours. Make use of the week off for Thanksgiving break and the long winter break for farther distance trips. Schedule these events early!

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