Is there a limit to how much I can borrow in subsidized or unsubsidized loans?

Undergraduate and graduate students that borrow Federal Direct Student Loans (subsidized and/or unsubsidized) need to be aware there are maximum allowable loan limits. There is an annual maximum loan limit which restricts the total amount a student can borrow for an academic year (fall, spring, and summer). Also, there are aggregate maximum loan limits which restrict the amount a student can borrow over their college career.

Maximum Loan LimitsWritten by Josh Keen, Office of Student Financial Aid

 

Spotlight on Library Resources: Borrow

Understanding the Mathematics of Personal Finance [electronic resource] : an Introduction to Financial Literacy by Lawrence N. Dworsky

Are you easily overwhelmed by numbers and interest rate calculations? Do you tend to avoid careful planning and decision-making when it comes to your personal finances because you simply have trouble understanding these calculations? If yes, then this is the guide for you!

Understanding the Mathematics of Personal Finance is a highly useful resource for the day-to-day management of personal finances. Even before introducing any of the contexts in which math is used in personal finance, the resource has a primer on the mathematics that serves as the basis for personal finance calculations.

At its root, this book is all about loan calculations, but the author, Lawrence N. Dworsky, has a broader definition of a loan. A loan is not just when an individual borrows money from a bank. A loan can also be an investment, but in that case another party is borrowing money from the individualSo this resource is useful not only for borrowing but also for investing.

Understanding the Mathematics of Personal Finance will equip you with the basic math skills for personal finance that you need to make informed decisions before you borrow money and as you pay it back. Dworsky is clear that this resource does not contain strategies for borrowing or investing. Instead, it gives you the ability to decide for yourself what decisions would be best, solely on the basis of numbers.

Note: This ebook can only be accessed on campus or off campus with your University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign NetID. If you do not have access to this ebook, please request a print copy through your local public library.

Written by Heidi Johnson, University of Illinois Library

What happens if I get declined for credit?

So, you’ve gotten declined for a credit card…Now what?

Each time you apply for credit, whether it is a credit card or a loan, it is called a “hard inquiry.” This stays on your credit report for two years. While getting declined credit will not negatively impact your credit score or history, a bank or lender will look at the number of “hard inquiries” you have; the more you have, the riskier you are. However, it is important to note that if you are looking for specific types of credit, like an auto loan or a mortgage, multiple inquiries will count as only one for credit scores.

It’s also important to understand why you were declined in the first place. Reasons can include: having too low of an income, owning too many credit cards, a record of late payments, being in collections, or having limited credit history. If you are denied credit, a lender is required to tell you why within 60 days of your application being rejected according to the Equal Credit Opportunity Act (ECOA).

If you’re still interested in learning more about this topic, check out these resources: “Credit Inquiries: Hard Inquiries and Soft Inquiries” and “Choosing the right card and what happens to credit scores if you are declined.”

Written by Alex Ziskind & Andrea Pellegrini, University of Illinois USFSCO Student Money Management Center

Where can I get a copy of my credit report?

There are several companies that say they provide free credit report services. However, very few actually do, or there’s always a catch–aka a fee–attached to it. Fortunately, AnnualCreditReport.com is the only website that allows you to access your credit reports from all three credit reporting bureaus for free once a year.

Checking your credit report is a great way to review your credit history and ensure that your identity hasn’t been compromised. Go to AnnualCreditReport.com to get a free copy of your credit report now!

Written by Alex Ziskind, University of Illinois USFSCO Student Money Management Center

How can I build credit without a credit card?

A great way to build credit without using a credit card is by taking out different types of loans. Now, we’re not saying you should take out a car or student loan, but if you have them already, that can work in your favor. Making those car and student loan payments on time helps build your credit history and shows that you not only are reliable, but you can use different types of loans for different situations. Also, signing up for utilities in your name helps build your credit. While it won’t establish a credit score, it can help first-time borrowers because it shows a history of responsible financial transactions.

If you’re still curious how to obtain credit without having it, here are two resources that can help guide you in the right direction: “Build Credit – Learn How to Establish a Solid Credit History” and “How to Establish Credit.”

Written by Alex Ziskind, University of Illinois USFSCO Student Money Management Center