What’s In A Name?: From Lynda.com to LinkedIn Learning

LinkedIn Learning Logo

Lynda.com had a long history with libraries. The online learning platform offered video courses to help people “learn business, software, technology and creative skills to achieve personal and professional goals.Lynda.com paired well with other library services and collections, offering library users the chance to learn new skills at their own pace in an accessible and varied medium. 

However, in 2015—twenty years after its initial launch—Lynda.com⁠⁠ was purchased by LinkedIn. A year later, Microsoft purchased LinkedIn for $26.2 billion. And now, in 2019, Lynda.com content is available through the newly-formed LinkedIn Learning.

Charmander evolving into Charmeleon

Sometimes, evolution is simple (like when it gets you one step closer to an Elite-Four-wrecking Charizard). Sometimes, it’s a little more complicated (like when Microsoft buys LinkedIn which just bought Lynda.com).

The good news is that this change from Lynda.com to LinkedIn Learning includes access to all of the same content previously available. This means that, through the University Library’s subscription, you still have access to courses on software like R, SQL, Tableu, Python, InDesign, Photoshop, and more (many of which are available to use on campus at the Scholarly Commons). There are also courses on broader, related topics like data science, database management, and user experience

Setting up your own personal account to access LinkedIn Learning is where things get just a little trickier. As a result of the transition from Lynda.com to LinkedIn Learning, users are now strongly encouraged to link their personal LinkedIn accounts with their LinkedIn Learning accounts. Completing courses in LinkedIn Learning will earn you badges that are automatically carried over to your LinkedIn account. However, this additional step—using a personal LinkedIn account to access these course—also makes the information about your LinkedIn Learning as public as your LinkedIn profile. Because Lynda.com only required a library card and PIN, this change in privacy has received push-back from libraries and library organizations across the country.

Obi-Wan Kenobi looking confused with caption reading [visible confusion]

This new policy change doesn’t mean you should avoid LinkedIn Learning, it just means you should use it with care and make an informed decision about your privacy settings. Maybe you want potential employers to see what you’re proactively learning about on the platform, maybe you to keep that information private. Either way, you can get details on setting up accounts and your privacy settings by consulting this guide created by Technology Services.

LinkedIn Learning can be accessed through the University Library here.

Spotlight on DiRT Directory: Digital Research Tools

The DiRT logo.

As a researcher, it can sometimes be frustrating knowing that someone out there has created a useful tool that will help you with what you’re working on, but being unable to find it. Google searches prove fruitless, and your network of friends don’t necessarily know what you’re talking about. In that moment of panic and frustration, you may just need to get a little DiRT-y.

DiRT Directory: Digital Research Tools is a directory of research tools for scholarly use. Using TaDiRAH (the Taxonomy of Digital Research Activities in the Humanities), DiRT breaks down the stages of a research project, and groups tools that are relevant to each stage: Capture, Creation, Enrichment, Analysis, Interpretation, Storage, and Dissemination. Users can either search for tools using these categories — broken down into subcategories whose specificity helps to narrow down the many tools found in the DiRT Directory — through a search box or by tag. Personally, I feel that searching through the TaDiRAH categories allows you to find relevant tools, but also allows you to explore options that you may not have previously thought of as being available, making it the most fruitful way to browse tools.

One nice aspect of DiRT is its search platform. After you choose your category, you have the option to search within the category for these criteria: Platform, Cost, Exclude, License, and Research Objects, as well as sort order. For researchers concerned with cost, this tool is especially useful, as you can limit your search to what is in your budget.

After you complete your search, you are offered a list of different tools. Tools range from well-known sources, like Google Docs, to things you have probably never heard of before. Each source includes a description, outlining what kind of tool it is — online, software, etc. — what its capabilities are, and in many cases, a note on its past or future development. Each entry also includes a link to the tool’s website, their license, and the date of DiRT’s most recent update on the source information.

An example tool entry on DiRT for Scrivener writing software.

An example tool entry on DiRT for Scrivener writing software on the search page.

Finally, each tool has its own page that you can access from the search function. This page holds a wealth of information, including an expanded description that outlines the nitty gritty aspects of the tool — from platforms to cost bracket to tags. It also includes screenshots of the tool in action, a list of recent edits to the page, and a comments section. However, not all tools have the same level of detail in their pages.

capture2

Scrivener’s page, which includes a description, screenshots, a list of contributors, and a comments section.

While the selection presented on DiRT can be almost overwhelming, digging through DiRT can help you find the perfect tools for your project.

If you still can’t find what you want in DiRT Directory, or need some guidance in what to search for in the first place, stop by the Scholarly Commons, located in Main Library Room 306, open from 9am-6pm on weekdays. Or, email us! We are always happy to help you with your research needs.