TiddlyWiki Review

Here at Commons Knowledge we like to talk about all of the various options out there for personal and information management tools, so today we’re talking about TiddlyWiki!

“It’s like a hypertext card index system from the future” -Jeremy Ruston, in the TiddlyWiki intro video

To summarize: this is a British, somewhat tricky to use, free and open source note taking and information management linked web wiki platform made in Javascript. TiddlyWiki is mostly used for task management. Still, if you’re looking for a way to manage all of your information and feeling particularly adventurous (and not at all into aesthetics, as TiddlyWiki is an ugly website — though CSS customization is possible) you might enjoy TiddlyWiki.

Everything in TiddlyWiki is a small piece, a tiddler —  a British word for a small fish — which you can stack, arrange, and link however you like. Tiddlers are individual units that you can incorporate into larger tiddlers through a process called “transclusion.” To have a tiddler all you need is a title. This is very similar to Scalar CMS where all content is equal, and can be linked or embedded in each other to tell both linear and nonlinear stories. However, TiddlyWiki is not as pretty and is focused more on note-taking and information management than presentation.

An example of a Tiddler

There are a lot of options for customization, as well as an active community that keeps the project alive and adds new customization options for different purposes (such as for writing a thesis). There is a WYSIWYG editor and formatting options, though you will still need to become familiar with the WikiText language in order to use more interesting formatting and customization. The WikiText language is similar to Markdown. There is also a plugin that will let you write your tiddlers in Markdown if you are more familiar and comfortable with that. You can add images and scribble all over them, as well as save links to websites with a download and some difficulty. TiddlyWiki includes search functionality and tagging, which is especially useful, as you can click on a tag you get a list of pages that have that tag. There are encryption plugins, which I have not tested, to create password-protected tiddlers and offer some basic security (though neither I nor the creators of TiddlyWiki endorse putting sensitive information on one of these sites).

You can use TiddlyWiki with TiddlySpot, Tiddly Desktop, or various browsers as well as node.js or a variety of other options for saving the program. Get started here.

Setting up where your files save so you can find them again is probably the hardest part of setting up a TiddlyWiki. It creates one HTML file that you update as you save. If you’re using Firefox and using the Firefox plugin I recommend downloading an empty wiki and copying it from your Downloads and pasting it to your G:Drive or another place where files aren’t deleted automatically. After, you can click on the cat icon and set it to automatically save your changes to your file on the Desktop.

Clicking on

Note: Don’t save things to the Desktop on Scholarly Commons computers long-term, as files are routinely erased.

Let us know in the comments if you have any other personal information management systems that need more love!

Writing the next great American novel, or realistically, finding the “write” tools to finish your thesis

The Scholarly Commons is a great place to write the next great American novel; in fact, I’m surprised it has not happened yet (no pressure dear patrons — we understand that you have a lot on your plates). We’re open Monday-Friday from 9-6 and enjoy a well-lit, fairly quiet, and overall ideal working space, with Espresso Royale and the Writing Center nearby. But actually getting that writing done, that’s the real challenge. Luckily, we have suggestions for tools and software you can use to keep writing and stay on track this semester!

Writing Your First Draft:

Yes, MS Word can be accessed for free for University students through the Web Store and you can set it up to better address your research needs with features like the Zotero and Mendeley plugins to incorporate your references. And don’t forget you can go to Word > File > Options > Proofing > Writing Style and select Grammar and Style and Settings to set what Spellcheck will check for so that passive voice gets underline. However, believe it or not, there are word processors, other than MS Word, that are better for organizing and creating large writing projects, such as novels, theses, or even plays!

Scrivener

Scrivener is a word processor created with novelists in mind that lets you organize your research and notes while you are writing. With an education discount, a license for Scrivener costs $38.25. Scrivener is very popular and highly recommended by two of the GAs here at Scholarly Commons (you can email Claire Berman with any questions you may have about the software at cberman2 [at] illinois.edu). To really get started, check out our online copies of Scrivener: An Absolute Beginner’s Guide and  Scrivener for Dummies!

Mellel

Unfortunately, Mellel is only available on Mac. An educational license for the software costs $29. To some extent Mellel is similar in style and price to Pages for Mac, but also shares similarities with MS Word for Mac. However, this word processor offers more options for customizing your word processing experience than Pages or MS Word. It also provides more options for outlining your work and dividing sections in a way that even MS Word Notebook version does not, which is great if you have a large written work with many sections, such as a novel or a thesis! Mellel also partners with the citation managers Bookends and Sente.

Markdown Editors like Ulysses

Ulysses is a simple and straightforward word processor for Mac, but you do have to write in Markdown without a WYSIWYG editor. It costs $44.99 for Mac and $24.99 for iOS. However, it has many great features for writers (such as built in word count writing goals for sections of a paper, and Markdown makes outlining work very easy and simple). We have discussed the value and importance of Markdown elsewhere on the blog before, specifically in our posts Digital Preservation and the Power of Markdown and Getting Started with Markdown, and of course, want to remind all of our lovely readers to consider doing their writing in Markdown. Learning Markdown can open up writing and digital publishing opportunities across the web (for example: Programming Historian tutorials are written in Markdown). Plus, writing in Markdown converts easily for simple web design without the headache of having to write in HTML.

Staying Focused:

Maybe you don’t want to buy a whole new word processor. That’s fine! Here are some tools that can help creating the “write” environment to get work done:

Freedom : costs $2.50 a month, so Freedom is not free, indeed. This is an an app that allows you to block websites and even the internet, available for Mac, Windows, iOS devices. This app also has a lock feature that will not allow you to make changes to what is blocked for a set period of time.

RescueTime : another app option. Taking a slightly different approach to the rest here, the lite version of this app helps you track how you use your time and what apps and websites you use the most so that you can have a better sense of what you are doing instead of writing. The premium version, which costs $54 a year, allows you to block distracting websites.

SelfControl: a Mac option but Open Source, with community built Linux and PC versions, and most importantly it’s free! This app allows you to block websites, based on their server, for a set period of time, in which there is basically NOTHING you can do on your computer to access these sites. So choose which sites to block and the time limit wisely.

Editing Tools:

Hemingway

Named after Ernest Hemingway, this text editor is supposed to help you adapt his style of writing, “bold and clear.” When you paste your text into the free web version, the applet gives you the text’s reading level as well as pointing out instances of awkward grammar, unnecessary or complicated words and adverbs, and sentences that are too long or too complicated.There’s a Desktop version available for $20 though I honestly don’t think it’s worth the money, though it does give another simple space on your computer to write and get feedback.

A note about Grammarly 

This is an alternative to MS Word spell check with a free version to add to your browser. As a browser add-in, it checks automatically for critical spelling and grammar mistakes (advanced ones cost a monthly fee) everywhere you write except situations where you’d really want extra spell check such as Google Docs and can be wonky with WordPress. You can always copy and paste into the Grammarly window, but at that point, you’re probably better doing spell check in MS Word. There are also only two versions of English available, American and British (take that Australia!). If you are trying to learn English and want instantaneous feedback while writing on the internet, or studying for high school standardized tests, or perhaps a frequent YouTube commenter in need of a quick check before posting, then Grammarly is for you. For most people at Scholarly Commons, this is a plugin they can skip, though I can’t speak for the paid version which is supposed to be a little bit better. If you uninstall the app they try to guilt trip you, so heads up.

SpellCheckPlus: It’s BonPatron in English! Brought to you by Nadaclair Language Technologies, this web-based text editor goes beyond MS Word’s spellcheck to help identify grammar errors and ways to make your writing sound more normal to a native (Canadian) English speaker. There is a version that costs money but if you don’t import more than the allotted 250 words of text at one time you will be fine using the free version.

Let us know what you think and any tools we may have missed! Happy writing!

And to learn more and find more great productivity tools, check out:

Personal Information Management LibGuide

Use Sifter for Twitter Research

For many academics, Twitter is an increasingly important source. Whether you love it or hate it, Twitter dominates information dissemination and discourse, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. However, actually sorting through Twitter — especially for large-scale projects — can be deceptively difficult, and a deterrent for would-be Twitter scholars. That is why Sifter will go through Twitter for you.

Sifter is a paid service — which will be discussed in greater detail below — which provides search and retrieve access for undeleted Tweets. Retrieved tweets are stored in an Enterprise DiscoverText account, which allows the user to perform data analytics on the Tweets. The DiscoverText account will be part of a fourteen day free trial, but for prolonged use the user will have to pay for account access.

However, Sifter can become prohibitively expensive. Each user can get three free estimates a day. Following that, it is $20 per day of data retrieval and $30 per 100,000 Tweets. Some more expensive purchases (over $500 and $1500, respectively) will receive longer DiscoverText trials with access added for additional users. There are no refunds. So prior to making your purchase, make sure that you have done enough research to know exactly what data you want, and which filters you’d like to use.

Possible filters that you can request when using Sifter.

Have you used Sifter? Or DiscoverText? What was your experience like? Alternatively, do you have a free resource that you prefer to use for Twitter data analytics? Please let us know in the comments!

Topic Modeling and the Future of Ebooks

Ebook by Daniel Sancho CC BY 2.0

This semester I’ve had the pleasure of taking a course on Issues in Scholarly Communication with Dr. Maria Bonn at the University of Illinois iSchool. While we’ve touched on a number of fascinating issues in this course, I’ve been particularly interested in JSTOR Labs’ Reimagining the Monograph Project.

This project was inspired by the observation that, while scholarly journal articles have been available in digital form for some time now, scholarly books are now just beginning to become available in this format. Nevertheless, the nature of long form arguments, that is, the kinds of arguments you find in books, differs in some important ways from the sorts of materials you’ll find in journal articles. Moreover, the ways that scholars and researchers engage with books are often different from the ways in which they interact with papers. In light of this, JSTOR Labs has spearheaded an effort to better understand the different ways that scholarly books are used, with an eye towards developing digital monographs that better suit these uses.

Topicgraph logo

In pursuit of this project, the JSTOR Labs team created Topicgraph, a tool that allows researchers to see, at a glance, what topics are covered within a monograph. Users can also navigate directly to pages that cover the topics in which they are interested. While Topicgraph is presented as a beta level tool, it provides us with a clear example of the untapped potential of digital books.

A topic graph for Suburban Urbanites

Topicgraph uses a method called topic modeling, which is used in natural language processing. Topic modeling will examine text, and then create different topics that are discussed in that text based on the terms being used. Terms that are used in proximity to one another at a frequent rate are thought to serve as an indicator that various topics are being discussed.

Users can explore Topicgraph by using JSTOR Labs’ small collection of open access scholarly books that span a number of different disciplines, or by by uploading their own PDFs for Topicgraph to analyze.

If you would like to learn how to incorporate topic modeling or other forms of text analysis into your research, contact the Scholarly Commons or visit us in the Main Library, room 306.

Meet Eleanor Dickson, the Visiting HathiTrust Digital Humanities Specialist

Photo of Eleanor Dickson

This latest installment in our series of interviews with Scholarly Commons experts and affiliates features Eleanor Dickson, the Visiting HathiTrust Research Center Digital Humanities Specialist.


What is your background education and work experience? What led you to this field?

I have a B.A. in English and History with a minor in Italian studies. As an undergraduate I worked at a library which was a really fun experience. I also took an archival research trip to Florida for my undergraduate thesis research and realized I wanted to do what the archivist was doing. I have a Masters in Science in Information Studies from the University of Texas at Austin, and completed a postgraduate fellowship at the university archives / Emory Center for Digital Scholarship. And now I’m here!

What is your research agenda?

I research scholarly practice in humanities and digital scholarship, specifically digital humanities with a focus on the needs and practices in large scale text analysis.I also sometimes help with the development of train the trainer curriculum for librarians so librarians can be better equipped with the skills needed to teach patrons about their options when it comes to digital scholarship.

Do you have any favorite work-related duties?

My favorite work-related duties are talking to researchers and hearing about what they are up to. I am fascinated by the different processes, methods, and resources they’re using. With HathiTrust I get to talk to researchers across the country about text analysis projects.

What are some of your favorite underutilized resources that you would recommend to researchers?

I wish more people came to the Digital Humanities Savvy Researcher workshops. If people have suggestions for what they want to see PLEASE LET US KNOW.

(To see what Savvy Researcher workshops might tickle your fancy click here to check out our complete workshop calendar.)

If you could recommend only one book to beginning researchers in your field, what would you recommend?

Debates in Digital Humanities, which is an open access book available free online!

Need assistance with a Digital Humanities project? E-mail Eleanor Dickson or the Scholarly Commons.

HackCulture: A Hackathon for the Humanities, Spring 2017

We live in a data-filled world. Over 2.5 quintillion bytes of data are created every day—everything from election polls to Pokémon Go collects and uses big data—and the number of data collecting services around the world only grows. Working with and understanding data is a valuable skill for many students and scholars, from art historians to engineers. That’s why this fall the library is hosting HackCulture: A Hackathon for the Humanities, for students from across disciplines to work together on data-driven projects.

Participants will work in interdisciplinary teams of four to create projects that relate to the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Sesquicentennial. We hope the final results will be creative, useful, and engaging, but their final form is up to each student group! HackCulture will give participants the opportunity to network with like-minded individuals, and showcase their projects to the public. Plus, the winning team will earn $2,500! (And they said studying the humanities would never make you money!) Check out more about the contest and its prizes here.

Registration for HackCulture ends on March 18th. HackCulture will officially start with a Kickoff event on April 8th. Groups will then have several weeks to work before they present their final projects to the judges on April 23rd.

Students interested in participating who want to build-up their technical chops before the event can attend a Humanities Data Programming Workshop on April 13th and 14th. This two-day Humanities Data Programming Workshop is meant for the true beginner, and will teach programming skills for working with humanities and social science research data. Sign-ups for the workshops are located at the https://my.library.illinois.edu/data-carpentry.

For more detailed information about the contest, judging, eligibility, and the application itself, head to the HackCulture homepage. If you have any questions about HackCulture, you can write an email to hackculture@library.illinois.edu, or leave a comment below.

Otherwise, happy hacking, Illini!

Scholarly Smackdown: StoryMap JS vs. Story Maps

In today’s very spatial Scholarly Smackdown post we are covering two popular mapping visualization products, Story Maps and StoryMap JS.Yes they both have “story” and “map” in the name and they both let you create interactive multimedia maps without needing a server. However, they are different products!

StoryMap JS

StoryMap JS, from the Knight Lab at Northwestern, is a simple tool for creating interactive maps and timelines for journalists and historians with limited technical experience.

One  example of a project on StoryMap JS is “Hockey, hip-hop, and other Green Line highlights” by Andy Sturdevant for the Minneapolis Post, which connects the stops of the Green Line train to historical and cultural sites of St. Paul and Minneapolis Minnesota.

StoryMap JS uses Google products and map software from OpenStreetMap.

Using the StoryMap JS editor, you create slides with uploaded or linked media within their template. You then search the map and select a location and the slide will connect with the selected point. You can embed your finished map into your website, but Google-based links can deteriorate over time! So save copies of all your files!

More advanced users will enjoy the Gigapixel mode which allows users to create exhibits around an uploaded image or a historic map.

Story Maps

Story maps is a custom map-based exhibit tool based on ArcGIS online.

My favorite example of a project on Story Maps is The Great New Zealand Road Trip by Andrew Douglas-Clifford, which makes me want to drop everything and go to New Zealand (and learn to drive). But honestly, I can spend all day looking at the different examples in the Story Maps Gallery.

Story Maps offers a greater number of ways to display stories than StoryMap JS, especially in the paid version. The paid version even includes a crowdsourced Story Map where you can incorporate content from respondents, such as their 2016 GIS Day Events map.

With a free non-commercial public ArcGIS Online account you can create a variety of types of maps. Although it does not appear there is to overlay a historical map, there is a comparison tool which could be used to show changes over time. In the free edition of this software you have to use images hosted elsewhere, such as in Google Photos. Story Maps are created through their wizard where you add links to photos/videos, followed by information about these objects, and then search and add the location. It is very easy to use and almost as easy as StoryMap JS. However, since this is a proprietary software there are limits to what you can do with the free account and perhaps worries about pricing and accessing materials at a later date.

Overall, can’t really say there’s a clear winner. If you need to tell a story with a map, both software do a fine job, StoryMap JS is in my totally unscientific opinion slightly easier to use, but we have workshops for Story Maps here at Scholarly Commons!  Either way you will be fine even with limited technical or map making experience.

If you are interested in learning more about data visualization, ArcGIS Story Maps, or geopatial data in general, check out these upcoming workshops here at Scholarly Commons, or contact our GIS expert, James Whitacre!

Text Analysis Basics – See Your Words in Voyant!

Interested in doing basic text analysis but have no or limited programming experience? Do you feel intimidated by the command line? One way to get started with text analysis, visualization, and uncovering patterns in large amounts of text is with browser-based programs! And today we have a mega blockbuster blog post extravaganza about Voyant Tools!

Voyant is a great solid browser based tool for text analysis. It is part of the Text Analysis Portal for Research (TAPoR)  http://tapor.ca/home. The current project leads are Stéfan Sinclair at McGill University (one of the minds behind BonPatron!) and Geoffrey Rockwell at the University of Alberta.

Analyzing a corpus:

I wanted to know what I needed to know to get a job so I got as many job ads as I could and ran them through very basic browser-based text analysis tools (to learn more about Word Clouds check out this recent post for Commons Knowledge all about them!) in order to see if what I needed to study in library school would emerge and I could then use that information to determine which courses I should take. This was an interesting idea and I mostly found that jobs prefer you have an ALA-accredited degree, which was consistent with what I had heard from talking to librarians. Now I have collected even more job ads (around December from the ALA job list mostly with a few from i-Link and elsewhere) to see what I can find out (and hopefully figure out some more skills I should be developing while I’m still in school).

Number of job ads = 300 there may be a few duplicates and this is not the cleanest data.

Uploading a corpus:

Voyant Tools is found at https://voyant-tools.org.

Voyant Home Page

For small amounts of text, copy and paste into the “Add Text” box. Otherwise, add files by clicking “Upload” and choosing the Word or Text files you want to analyze. Then click “Reveal”.

So I added in my corpus and here’s what comes up:

To choose a different view click  the small rectangle icon and choose from a variety of views. To save the visualization you created in order to later incorporate it into your research click the arrow and rectangle “Upload” icon and choose which aspect of the visualization you want to save.

Mode change option circled

“Stop words” are words excluded because they are very common words such as “the” or “and” that don’t always tell us anything significant about the content of our corpus. If you are interested in adding stop words beyond the default settings, you can do that with the following steps:

Summary button on Voyant circled

1. Click on Summary

Home screen for Voyant with the edit settings circled

2. Click on the define options button

Clicking on edit list in Voyant

3. If you want to add more words to the default StopList click Edit List

Edit StopList window in Voyant

4. Type in new words and edit the ones already there in the default StopList and click Save to save.

Mouse click on New User Defined List

5. Or to add your own list click New User Defined List and paste in your own list in the Edit list feature instead of editing the default list.

Here are some of the cool different views you can choose from in Voyant:

Word Cloud:

The Links mode, which shows connections between different words and how often they are paired with the thickness of the line between them.

My favorite mode is TextArc based on the text analysis and visualization project of the same name created by W. Brad Paley in the early 2000s. More information about this project can be found at http://www.textarc.org/, where you can also find Text arc versions of classic literature.

Voyant is pretty basic, it will give you a bunch of stuff you probably already knew, such as to get a library job it helps to have library experience. The advantage of the TextArc setting is that it puts everything out there and lets you see the connections between different words. And okay, it looks really cool too.

Check it out the original animated below! Warning this may slow down or even crash your browser:  https://voyant-tools.org/?corpus=3de9f7190e781ce7566e01454014a969&view=TextualArc

I also like the Bubbles feature (not to be confused with the Bubblelines feature) though none of the other GAs or staff here do, one going so far as to refer to it as an “abomination”.

Circles with corpus words (also listed in side pane) on inside

Truly abominable

The reason I have not included a link to this is DEFAULT VERSION MAY NOT MEET WC3 WEB DESIGN EPILEPSY GUIDELINES. DO NOT TRY IF YOU ARE PRONE TO PHOTOSENSITIVE SEIZURES. It is adapted from the much less flashy “Letter Pairs” project created by Martin Ignacio Bereciartua. This mode can also crash your browser.

To learn more about applying for jobs we have a Savvy Researcher workshop!

If you thought these tools were cool, to learn more advanced text mining techniques we have an upcoming Savvy Researcher workshop, also on March 6 :

Happy text mining and job searching! Hope to see some of you here at Scholarly Commons on March 6!

Review: The Infographic History of the World by Valentina D’Efilippo and James Ball

The Infographic History of the World, created by Valentina D’Efilippo and James Ball, consists of various infographics with accompanying commentaries. You can find this book and read it at Scholarly Commons, near our other infographic and visualization books! You can also check it out from a nearby library!

Overall, this book is a compelling read and an interesting idea as a project and some of the infographics were really well done. This book demonstrates the power of infographics to help us present and break down important topics to wider audiences. Yes, this isn’t supposed to be a serious read, but there was a lot I did not like about this book, specifically throughout I got a sense that:

Statue of a person with hands over face. Located by the Main Library entrance facing the UGL

Somewhere a political scientist is crying…     Photo credit to E. Hardesty and the Main Library with the original image found at https://flic.kr/p/rw2Ldz

  • “The story of the last 4,000 years is one of nations being founded, breaking apart, going to war, and coming together” (D’Efilippo & Ball, 2013). For those confused why this is a problem, “nation” is a very modern term and concept so that’s a serious anachronism.
  • Why is the theocracy symbol notably non-Western and not used for the English Civil War, which was apparently about republicanism?
  • A history of the “Net” that doesn’t mention Minitel.
  • First flight goes to the Wright Brothers. No mention of Santos-Dumont or the controversy (for everyone who noticed that inexplicable early aircraft cameo at this year’s Olympic opening).
  • The book is very Anglo-centric.

Sloppy stats!

 

  • I’m suspicious anytime Luxembourg wins something. Are they really the biggest drinkers or how does their small population make this data less meaningful?
  • “Absolute number of cannabis users by region” Absolute? Really?
  • Overall, not enough information on where and how a lot of the statistics were generated and why we should trust those sources. Yes, there is an appendix on the back that explains this to some extent in tiny text but not helpful for people who just glance at the infographic and assume it’s giving us useful information about the world.

Visualization issues!

 

  • Emphasizing form over function — much like the new Macbooks with so few ports they are practically landlocked — many of the infographics fail to present the information in a way that is appropriate for what they are trying to present. For example, the Mona Lisa paint by numbers probably would have been more effective as a timeline.
    • Maybe I’m just too attached to the idea of timelines being well on a line or perhaps maybe the spiral depicted on the book’s cover art.
    • Some of the infographics have way too many things going on and are trying to make too many points at once.
  • The colors on the mental illness brain are too close (and I can’t imagine how that would look to someone who is colorblind), and there are other examples where the colors are very close and render the infographic pretty, but hard to actually use to learn something from.

Finally, the authors’ claim of “not trying to be political” / “this is just for fun” is no excuse for not being thorough especially with information targeted to the public. Full disclosure or not, artists and journalists still need to be careful because what people see can influence the way they think about things. Infographics are not a neutral presentation of information, certain choices were made, and audiences need to think about who made these choices and why. Not as bad as some of the examples on this Visual Literacy and Infographics blog post, but still problematic. Please, do not be reckless when making infographics!

To learn more how to create infographics of your own check out our Savvy Researcher workshop: Introduction to Infographics Using Piktochart!

If you are an undergraduate interested in conducting research and becoming information and visual literate there is an entire set of classes in the history department for this through SourceLab. Take a look at their schedule or talk to Professor Randolph to learn more!

 

Review: Paperpile Citation Manager

Are you addicted to Google Docs and are looking for a citation manager, PDF reader, or research workflow system? Do you wish you could just cite while you write in Google docs like you do with Zotero or Mendeley in Word? Do you have an extra $36 a year to spare?

Then you might want to try Paperpile!

Paperpile App Main Menu

Paperpile is a simplified reference management system and research workflow program for Google Chrome created by three computational biologists based in Vienna.

Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Can organize your sources when you’re trying to write a paper or doing readings
  • A lot of explanatory text in the app
  • Allows you to import metadata and PDFs from your browser (similar to Zotero’s one click import) and asks you if you want to add the item (PDF and details) to Paperpile
  • The annotations feature makes readings and notes for classes a lot of fun with very pretty colors
  • When the PDF is not encrypted, if you highlight the text it will copy the highlighted text into notes with your annotations that you can then copy and paste when writing a paper
  • Wide range of document types and citation styles
  • You can cite while you write in Google Docs
  • Provides look up to find similar journal articles to what you are researching, which allows you to do research through the app, especially if you’re doing research from science databases
  • Keyboard shortcuts
  • 15 GB of free space through Google
  • Good customer service
  • Thorough explanatory material
Highlighted text with annotations in the Paperpile app

Excerpt from Montesinos, Gary. 2015. “The Invisible (S)elf: Identity in House Elves and Harry Potter.” Re:Search: The Undergraduate Literary Criticism Journal 2 (1). https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/handle/2142/78004.
And check out Re:Search: The Undergraduate Literary Criticism Journal and more great undergraduate research in IDEALS!

Cons:

  • High cost ($36), especially compared to solid free options like Mendeley and Zotero
  • Requires Internet access
  • Although the company is in the process of developing a plugin for MS Word, currently, Paperpile is heavily reliant on Google and Google Drive
  • Paperpile is a proprietary software and a startup so there are risks that they will go out of business or be bought by a larger company
    • Though, should the worst happen Paperpile uses open standards that will allow you to get your PDFs, citations out — even if they are in an ugly format — as well as the highlighted text saved in your PDFs, which can be downloaded through Google Drive
  • Paperpile is a very new product and there are still a lot of features to be worked out
    • I will say however that it is a lot less buggy than a lot of comparable reference management / PDF annotation software that have been around longer and aren’t classified as in beta, like Readcube and Highlights

Paperpile is comparable to: Mendeley, iLibrarian, colwiz, Highlights.

Learn more about personal information management through our PIM Libguide, various Savvy Researcher workshops and more! Let us know about your strategies for keeping everything organized in the comments!