Save the Date: Edward Ayers Talk

Ayers_Edward_photo

We are so excited to be hosting a talk by Edward Ayers this coming March! Save the date on your calendars:

March 29, 2018 | 220 Main Library | 4-6 pm

Edward Ayers has been named National Professor of the Year, received the National Humanities Medal from President Obama at the White House, won the Bancroft Prize and Beveridge Prize in American history, and was a finalist for the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He has collaborated on major digital history projects including the Valley of the Shadow, American Panorama, and Bunk, and is one of the co-hosts for BackStory, a popular podcast about American history. He is Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities and president emeritus at the University of Richmond as well as former Dean of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is The Thin Light of Freedom: The Civil War and Emancipation in the Heart of America, published in 2017 by W. W. Norton.

His talk will be on “Twenty-Five Years in Digital History and Counting”.

Edward Ayers began a digital project just before the World Wide emerged and has been pursuing one project or several projects ever since. His current work focuses on the two poles of possibility in the medium: advanced projects in visualizing processes of history at the Digital Scholarship Lab at the University of Richmond and a public-facing project in Bunk, curating representations of the American past for a popular audience.

We hope you’ll be able to join us at his public talk in March!

Scholarly Commons Brownbag Discussion: Librarians Training in Digital Scholarship

On Tuesday, November 14, 2-3pm in 106 Main Library, Librarians Dan Tracy, David Morris, Antonio Sotomayor and Harriett Green will be speaking about their experiences at the inaugural Association for Research Libraries’ Digital Scholarship Institute. Held in June 2017 at Boston College, the Institute introduced librarians who are not currently involved in digital scholarship to the methodologies and tools for such work. This multi-institutional initiative, led in part by the University of Illinois, aims to facilitate broader transformations in academic libraries and create a strong community of practice around digital scholarship work. Harriett Green and Dan Tracy will speak about their involvement in organizing and teaching for the Digital Scholarship Institute, and Antonio Sotomayor and David Morris will share their experiences attending the first Institute.

Harriett Green, Head of Scholarly Communication and Publishing
David Morris, Classics Librarian, Research & Information Services Librarian
Antonio Sotomayor, Latin American and Caribbean Studies Librarian
Dan Tracy, Information Sciences and Digital Humanities Librarian

Hope to see you there!

Open Access Week at the University of Illinois Library

It’s that time of year again! Open Access Week is October 23-27, and the University of Illinois Library is excited to participate. Open Access Week is an international event where the academic and research community come together to learn about Open Access and to share that knowledge with others. In its eighth year, the U of I Library has a great week of events planned!

  • Monday: Workshop: “A Crash Course in Open Access”, 12-1 PM, 314 Main Library
  • Tuesday: Workshop: Open Access Publishing and You, 12-1 PM, 314 Main Library
  • Wednesday: Workshop: Managing Your Copyright and Author’s Rights, 12-1 PM, 314 Main Library
  • Thursday: Scholarly Communication Interest Group Kickoff meeting, 12-1 PM, 106 Main Library
  • Friday: Workshop: Sharing Your Research with ORCiDs, DOIs, and open data repositories, 12-1 PM, 314 Main Library

Fore more information on open access, visit the Scholarly Communication and Publishing website.

CITL Workshops and Statistical Consulting Fall 2017

CITL is back at it again with the statistics, survey, and data consulting services! They have a busy fall 2017, with a full schedule of workshops on the way, as well as their daily consulting hours in the Scholarly Commons.

Their workshops are as follows:

  • 9/19: R I: Getting Started with R
  • 10/17: R I: Getting Started with R
  • 9/26: R II: Inferential Statistics
  • 10/24: R II: Inferential Statistics
  • 10/3: SAS I: Getting Started with SAS
  • 10/10: SAS II: Inferential Statistics with SAS
  • 10/4: STATA I: Getting Started with Stata
  • 9/20: SPSS I: Getting Started with SPSS
  • 9/27: SPSS II: Inferential Statistics with SPSS
  • 10/11: ATLAS.ti I: Qualitative Data analysis
  • 10/12: ATLAS.ti II: Data Exploration and Analysis

Workshops are free, but participants must register beforehand. For more information about each workshop, and to register, head to the CITL Workshop Details and Resources page.

And remember that CITL is at the Scholarly Commons Monday – Friday, 10 AM – 4 PM.You can always request a consultation, or walk-in.

This Semester at the Scholarly Commons

The sun is shining, the birds are singing, and it’s a new semester at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. And with that new semester come all of the happenings at the Scholarly Commons. We have some great things coming up!

Hours

We’re back to our normal hours. Come visit us from 9 AM – 6 PM, Monday – Friday. We hope to see you soon!

Survey Research Lab

Survey Research Lab open hours are back! Walk-ins are accepted from 2 – 5 PM every Thursday, or you can make an advance appointment by emailing Linda Owens, Sowmya Anand, and Karen Retzer (please copy all addresses on your email).

During Open Horus, the Survey Research Lab can look at sampling, questionnaire design, and analysis. Come in with questions about the dos and don’ts of survey wording, recommendations for designing a sampling strategy, or advice on drafting a questionnaire!

CITL Statistical Consulting

Starting August 28th and running through the end of the semester, CITL graduate students will provide free statistical consulting in the Scholarly Commons. CITL consulting will be 11 AM – 4 PM every Monday – Friday. Consultants work with SPSS, ATLAS.ti, Stata, R, and SAS. The consultants may take walk-ins, but you can also email statconsulting@illinois.edu for an appointment.

Savvy Researcher Workshops

Our Savvy Researcher Workshop calendar is finally up! New offerings this semester include Understanding Bias: Evaluating News & Scholarly Sources, Copyright for Educators,Conducting Research with Primary Sources and Digital Tools, Managing Your Copyrights, and Finding Data about Residential Real Estate, and more. Of course, old favorites will be offered, as well!

Staff

We have some new and returning staff members at the Scholarly Commons! Digital Scholarship Liaison and Instruction Librarian Merinda Hensley is back from sabbatical, and Carissa Phillips is now the Data Discovery and Business Librarian. We’re also welcoming Data Analytics and Visualization Resident Librarian Megan Ozeran, as well as Scholarly Commons Interns Clay Alsup and Matt Pitchford, and Graduate Assistants Billy Tringali and Joe Porto. Stop in and say hello!

Adventures at the Spring 2017 Library Hackathon

This year I participated in an event called HackCulture: A Hackathon for the Humanities, which was organized by the University Library. This interdisciplinary hackathon brought together participants and judges from a variety of fields.

This event is different than your average campus hackathon. For one, it’s about expanding humanities knowledge. In this event, teams of undergraduate and graduate students — typically affiliated with the iSchool in some way — spend a few weeks working on data-driven projects related to humanities research topics. This year, in celebration of the sesquicentennial of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, we looked at data about a variety of facets of university life provided by the University Archives.

This was a good experience. We got firsthand experience working with data; though my teammates and I struggled with OpenRefine and so we ended up coding data by hand. I now way too much about the majors that are available at UIUC and how many majors have only come into existence in the last thirty years. It is always cool to see how much has changed and how much has stayed the same.

The other big challenge we had was not everyone on the team had experience with design, and trying to convince folks not to fall into certain traps was tricky.

For an idea of how our group functioned, I outlined how we were feeling during the various checkpoints across the process.

Opening:

We had grand plans and great dreams and all kinds of data to work with. How young and naive we were.

Midpoint Check:

Laura was working on the Python script and sent a well-timed email about what was and wasn’t possible to get done in the time we were given. I find public speaking challenging so that was not my favorite workshop. I would say it went alright.

Final:

We prevailed and presented something that worked in public. Laura wrote a great Python script and cleaned up a lot of the data. You can even find it here. One day in the near future it will be in IDEALS as well where you can already check out projects from our fellow humanities hackers.

Key takeaways:

  • Choose your teammates wisely; try to pick a team of folks you’ve worked with in advance. Working with a mix of new and not-so-new people in a short time frame is hard.
  • Talk to your potential client base! This was definitely something we should have done more of.
  • Go to workshops and ask for help. I wish we had asked for more help.
  • Practicing your presentation in advance as well as usability testing is key. Yes, using the actual Usability Lab at Scholarly Commons is ideal but at the very least take time to make sure the instructions for using what you created are accurate. It’s amazing what steps you will leave off when you have used an app more than twice. Similarly make sure that you can run your program and another program at the same time because if you can’t chances are it means you might crash someone’s browser when they use it.

Overall, if you get a chance to participate in a library hackathon, go for it, it’s a great way to do a cool project and get more experience working with data!

Summer Changes at the Scholarly Commons

Beginning on Monday, May 15th, the Scholarly Commons will begin our summer hours:

  • Monday to Friday, 10:00am to 5:00pm

Other changes:

  • The Survey Research Lab and our Statistical Consulting Hours will go on hiatus until Summer Term 2. They will become available again the week of June 12th.

Thank you, and we hope to see you at the Scholarly Commons soon!

Publishing Perspectives at Illinois: A Panel

Join us on Thursday, April 20th 2017, 4 to 5 p.m. in 106 Main Library for an insightful discussion on various opportunities and avenues for publishing here at Illinois!

A panel of experts from the University of Illinois Press, eTexts at Illinois, the Scholarly Commons Undergraduate Research Journals program, and the Illinois Open Publishing Network (University Library) will discuss topics ranging from:

  • advice on submitting a proposal,
  • the process of publishing in journals,
  • creating online textbooks,
  • and open access publishing.

Panelists:
Laurie Matheson, University of Illinois Press
Dawn Durante, University of Illinois Press
Julianne Laut, University of Illinois Press
Clydette Wantland, University of Illinois Press
Harriett Green, University Library
Milind Basole, eTexts @ Illinois
Yury Borukhovich, eTexts @ Illinois
Merinda Hensley, University Library

 

 

Register Today for ICPSR’s Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research

The ICPSR logo.

The Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) is once again offering its summer workshops for researchers! Workshops range from Rational Choice Theories of Politics and Society to Survival Analysis, Event History Modeling, and Duration Analysis. There are so many fantastic choices across the country that we can hardly decide which we’d want to go to the most!

This is what the ICPSR website describes the workshops as:

Since 1963, the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) has offered the ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research as a complement to its data services. The ICPSR Summer Program provides rigorous, hands-on training in statistical techniques, research methodologies, and data analysis. ICPSR Summer Program curses emphasize the integration of methodological strategies with the theoretical and practical concerns that arise in research on substantive issues. The Summer Program’s broad curriculum is designed to fulfill the needs of researchers throughout their careers. Participants in each year’s Summer Program generally represent about 30 different disciplines from more than 350 colleges, universities, and organizations around the world. Because of the premier quality of instruction and unparalleled opportunities for networking, the ICPSR Summer Program is internationally recognized as the leader for training in research methodologies and technologies used across the social, behavioral, and medical sciences.

Courses are available in 4-week sessions (June 26 – July 21, 2017 and July 24 – August 18, 2017) as well as shorter workshops lasting 3-to-5 days (beginning May 8). More details about the courses can be found here.

Details about registration deadlines, fees, and other important information can be found here.

If you want some help figuring out which workshops are most appropriate for you or just want to chat about the exciting offerings, come on over to the Scholarly Commons, where our social science experts can give you a hand!

Juan Pablo Alperin: Does Our Research Serve the Public, or Only Ourselves?

Juan Pablo Alperin.

Mark your calendars: Juan Pablo Alperin is coming to campus on March 9th to give a lecture titled, “Does Our Research Serve the Public, or Only Ourselves?” The Talk will place in Illini Union 407 at 4:00 pm.

Here is the official abstract for the talk:

Traditionally, scholarly efforts have focused on making research available and discoverable among scholars, scientists, and related professionals. However, with the onset of the digital era and the electronic circulation of research and scholarship, a new model of “open access” to this body of work has taken hold, one which is committed to making research freely and universally available online. The same digital era has given us the possibility of capturing and measuring how knowledge is produced, disseminated, and used, both within and beyond this traditional group of professional researchers. In his talk, Dr. Alperin will present research findings, gathered through novel strategies and tools, that the public is already taking advantage of the growing body of freely available research. However, despite the growing evidence and a stated interest that our work have societal impact, many of our scholarly publishing practices continue to keep the research out of the public’s hands. As it becomes easier to provide evidence of public interest even in the most obscure and esoteric topics, academics of all stripes will be increasingly challenged to ask ourselves if our scholarly publishing system is serving the public’s best interests, or simply our own.

And here is Juan Pablo Alperin’s bio:

Juan Pablo Alperin is an Assistant Professor at the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing and the Associate Director of Research with the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University. He is a multi-disciplinary scholar, with training in computer science (BMath, University of Waterloo), social science (MA Geography, University of Waterloo), and education (PhD, Stanford University), who believes that research, especially when it is made freely available (as so much of today’s work is), has the potential to make meaningful and direct contributions to society, and that it is our responsibility as the creators of this research to ensure we understand the mechanisms, networks, and mediums through which our work is discussed and used.

 

A list of his publications and presentations can be found at http://alperin.ca/cv, and he can be found on Twitter at @juancommander.

For more information on the event, see our Scholarly Commons Speaker Series page and the Facebook page for this event! Hope to see you there!