Analyze and Visualize Your Humanities Data with Palladio

How do you make sense of hundreds of years of handwritten scholarly correspondence? Humanists at Stanford University had the same question, and developed the project Mapping the Republic of Letters to answer it. The project maps scholarly social networks in a time when exchanging ideas meant waiting months for a letter to arrive from across […]

Lightning Review: Text Analysis with R for Students of Literature

My undergraduate degree is in Classical Humanities and French, and like many humanities and liberal arts students, computers were mostly used for accessing Oxford Reference Online and double checking that “bonjour” meant “hello” before term papers were turned in. Actual critical analysis of literature came from my mind and my research, and nothing else. Recently, […]

Puentes/Bridges: Highlights from DH2018

At the end of June, the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations (ADHO) coordinated their annual international DH conference, Digital Humanities 2018, in Mexico City. DH2018 was the first conference in the organization’s history to be held in Latin America and in the global south. With a theme of Puentes/Bridges, DH2018 emphasized transnational discourse and inclusivity. […]

Our Graduate Assistants: Kayla Abner

This interview is part of a new series introducing our graduate assistants to our online community. These are some of the people you will see when you visit our space, who will greet you with a smile and a willingness to help! Say hello to Kayla Abner! What is your background education and work experience? […]

New Digital Humanities Books in the Scholarly Commons!

Is there anything quite as satisfying as a new book? We just got a new shipment of books here in the Scholarly Commons that complement all our services, including digital humanities. Our books are non-circulating, so you cannot check them out, but these DH books are always available for your perusal in our space. Digital […]

Using an Art Museum’s Open Data

*Edits on original idea and original piece by C. Berman by Billy Tringali As a former art history student, I’m incredibly interested in the how the study of art history can be aided by the digital humanities. More and more museums have started allowing the public to access a portion of their data. When it […]

Using Reddit’s API to Gather Text Data

I initially started my research with an eye to using digital techniques to analyze an encyclopedia that collects a number of conspiracy theories in order to determine what constitute typical features of conspiracy theories. At this point, I realize there were two flaws in my original plan. First, as discussed in a previous blog post, […]

An Obstacle and (Hopefully) a Solution in Digital Research

This post is part of an ongoing series about my research on conspiracy theories and the tools I use to pursue it. You can read Part I: What is a Conspiracy Theory and Part II: Why Are Conspiracy Theories So Compelling? on Commons Knowledge. Part of my research project, in which I am attempting to give an […]

Introducing the Scholarly Commons Project Forum

The Scholarly Commons Project Forum is an hour-long bi-weekly meeting space for scholars who are interested in Digital Humanities questions regarding data and text. These meetings are an opportunity for informal, open-ended conversations about research where we will discuss conceptual, methodological, and workflow issues for projects. Those projects may be at any stage of development, […]

Celebrating Frederick Douglass with Crowdsourced Transcriptions

On February 14, 2018, the world celebrated Frederick Douglass’ 200th birthday. Douglass, the famed Black social reformer, abolitionist, writer and statesman, did not know the date of his birth, and chose the date of Februar   y 14, 1818 to celebrate his birthday. This year, to celebrate the 200th anniversary of his birth, Colored Conventions, […]