Exploring Data Visualization #10

In this monthly series, I share a combination of cool data visualizations, useful tools and resources, and other visualization miscellany. The field of data visualization is full of experts who publish insights in books and on blogs, and I’ll be using this series to introduce you to a few of them. You can find previous posts by looking at the Exploring Data Visualization tag.

A collage of images of sticky notes in different configurations from the article "stickies!"

Sticky notes in all different shapes, sizes, and colors provide a perfect medium for project planning.

1. Sometimes when you want to visualize your thinking, digital tools just don’t cut it and you have to go back to cold, hard paper. At the beginning of November, Cole Nussbaumer Knaflic at Storytelling with Data make a #SWDchallenge for readers to use sticky notes to represent their thinking and plan out a data visualization the old fashioned way! The images that resulted from that challenge, seen in the post stickies!, are an office-supply lover’s dream. I’ve taken inspiration from these posts in my own project planning for the past month—here’s a sneak peek of my thoughts for a sign that will be displayed in a library study space:

A piece of paper that reads "Welcome to Room 220" at the top with sticky notes stuck to the page underneath.

2. In a feature from February of this year, the digital branch of German newspaper Die Zeit, ZEIT ONLINE, showed some interesting finds from their database of approximately 450,000 street names used across Germany. They call the project Streetscapes and use them to explore important parts of German history. These street names show the legacy of political division in Germany, as well as noting what the most common names for streets are and what the age of different streets in Berlin are.

A map of Berlin with streets highlighted in different colors based on the age of the street name.

Older street names are clearly concentrated toward the center of Berlin.

3. Google Maps updated their display this year to zoom out to a globe instead of a flat Mercator projection, noting in a tweet on August 2nd that “With 3D Globe Mode…, Greenland’s projection is no longer the size of Africa.” Adapting the shape of countries from a globe to a flat map has always been a challenge and has resulted in some confusion as to how the Earth’s geography actually looks. In the third part of a series of Story Maps about “The World’s Troubled Lands & Geopolitical Curiosities,” John Nelson outlines some of those misconceptions. In a National Geographic write-up titled “Why your mental map of the world is (probably) wrong,” Betsy Mason goes deeper into why we hold these misconceptions and why they are so hard to let go of.

The title slide of a story map with text that reads "Misconceptions Some Common Geographic Mental Misplacements..."

The story map shows which three different regions people often misplace in their minds.

I hope you enjoyed this data visualization news! If you have any data visualization questions, please feel free to email the Scholarly Commons.