Learn Python Summer 2017

Are you sitting around thinking to yourself, golly, the bloggers at Commons Knowledge have not tried to convince me to learn Python in a few weeks, what’s going on over there? Well, no worries! We’re back with another post going over the reasons why you should learn Python. And to answer your next question no, the constant Python promotion isn’t us taking orders from some sinister serpentine society. We just really like playing with Python and coding here at the Scholarly Commons.

Why should I learn Python?

Python is a coding language with many applications for data science, bioinformatics, digital humanities, GIS, and even video games! Python is a great way to get started with coding and beef up your resume. It’s also considered one of the easier coding languages to learn and whether or not you are a student in LIS 452, we have resources here for you! And if you need help you can always email the Scholarly Commons with questions!

Where can I get started at Scholarly Commons?

We have a small section of great books aimed at new coders and those working on specific projects here in the space and online through the library catalog. Along with the classic Think Python book, some highlights include:

Python Crash Course: A Hands on Project-Based Introduction to Programming

Python Crash Course is an introductory textbook for Python, which goes over programming concepts and is full of examples and practice exercises. One unique feature of this book is that it also includes three multi-step longer projects: a game, a data visualization, and a web app, which you can follow for further practice. One nice thing is that with these instructions available you have something to base your own long term Python projects on, whether for your research or a course. Don’t forget to check out the updates to the book at at their website.

Automate Boring Stuff with Python: Practical Programming for Total Beginners

Automate Boring Stuff with Python is a solid introduction to Python with lots of examples. The target audience is non-programmers who plan to stay non-programmers; the author aims to provide the minimum amount of information necessary so that users can ultimately use Python for useful tasks, such as batch organizing files. It is still a lot of information and I feel some of the visual metaphors are more confusing than helpful. Of course, having a programming background helps, despite the premise of the book.

This book can also be found online for free on this website.

Learn Python the Hard Way: A Very Simple Introduction to the Terrifyingly Beautiful World of Computers and Code

Although focused on Python 2, this is a book about teaching programming skills to newbie coders. Although the author does not specifically use this term this book is based on what is known in psychology as deliberate practice or “the hard way,” which is described in Cal Newport’s blog post “The Grandmaster in the Corner Office” (Newport, 2010).  And Learn Python the Hard Way certainly lives up to the title. Even the basic command line instructions prove difficult. But based on my own learning experiences with deliberate practice, if you follow the instructions I imagine you will have a solid understanding of Python, programming, and from what I’ve read in the book definitely some of your more techie friends’ programming jokes.

Online Resources

If the command line makes you scared or if you want to get started right away, definitely check out PythonAnywhere, which offers a basic plan that allows users to create and run Python programs in their browser. If PythonAnywhere isn’t your speed, check out this article, which lists the 45 best places to learn to code online.

Interested in joining an online Python learning group this summer?

Definitely check out, Advent of Python, an online Python co-learning group through The Digital Humanities Slack. It started Tuesday May 30 with introductions, and every week  there will be Python puzzles for you to help you develop your skills. IT IS NOT TOO LATE TO JOIN! The first check-in and puzzle solutions will be June 6. The solutions and check-ins are going to be every Tuesday, except the Fourth of July — that meeting will be on Wednesday, July 5.  There is a Slack, a Google Doc, and subreddits.

Living in Champaign-Urbana?

Be sure to check out Py-CU a Maker/Hacker group in Urbana welcome to coders with all levels of experience with the next meeting on June 3rd. And obligatory heads up, the Urbana Makerspace is pretty much located in Narnia.

Question for the comments, how did you learn to code? What websites, books and resources do you recommend for the newbie coder? 

Works Cited:

Newport, C. (2010, January 6). The Grandmaster in the Corner Office: What the Study of Chess Experts Teaches Us about Building a Remarkable Life. Retrieved May 30, 2017, from http://calnewport.com/blog/2010/01/06/the-grandmaster-in-the-corner-office-what-the-study-of-chess-experts-teaches-us-about-building-a-remarkable-life/
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