Am I Looking at the Right Degree Audit?

I thought now would be as good a time as any to remind people of some of the tips and tricks of checking your degree audits through U.Achieve. I’m going to make this a continuing series on the blog. The degree audit can be a confusing document, and I’d like to help make it easier for all of you to understand how it works. I’ll start off with a few frequently asked questions.

Why do I see a third Cultural Studies requirement?

If you see three categories under Cultural Studies (Western or Comparative Cultures, Non-Western Cultures, and U.S. Minority Cultures), then you are running your audit using a Fall 2018 Catalog Year. You don’t want to do that unless you will be a new freshman or transfer student in Fall 2018. Those students will need to complete one additional General Education requirement, but if you began studying at Illinois in Spring 2018 or before that, you only need to complete a Western or Comparative Cultures course and a Non-Western or U.S. Minority Cultures course.

 

What is my Catalog Year?

Your official Catalog Year is the year you matriculated at any college or university. This is usually set by your UIUC College when you begin studying here. However, in certain cases, you may need to run your degree audit using a different Catalog Year. Here are some of those cases:

 –If you are pursuing a concentration in Psychology

Clinical/Community, Organizational, Developmental, Behavioral Neuroscience, and        Cognitive Psychology all require a Catalog Year of Fall 2015 or later.

Social/Personality and General Psychology require a Catalog Year of Fall 2015-             Spring 2017. If your official Catalog Year is Fall 2017 or later, you cannot declare            either of these concentrations.

Cognitive Neuroscience, Diversity Science, Social Psychology, Personality                     Psychology, and Intradisciplinary Psychology all require a Catalog Year of Fall 2017       or later.

If you are checking your progress in a different major that has changed requirements   since you matriculated

– For example, you may have begun studying at a community college in Fall 2014,            but you want to declare a second major in Spanish at Illinois. That major changed          its requirements in 2017, so you would want to run your audit using a Fall 2017             Catalog Year.

As always, please e-mail or visit me or your ARO in the College of LAS to ask questions if you have trouble understanding your degree audit. We’re here to help!

 

 

 

 

Informatics Video Game Design Courses

NEW FOR FA2018! INFO 403: Game Design- Virtual Worlds. Instructor is Dan Cermak.   CRN = 70674.  Tues/Thurs, 3:30 – 4:45 pm in 2078 NHB.
Top Down Video Game Design: The emphasis of this course is on developing an understanding of top down video game design using the various design methodologies and tools introduced in class.  Students will form small groups (4-6) and work on their own design within a selected genre (to be determined at the beginning of the semester).  Areas of focus include high level design vision, audience evaluation, User Interface and its impact on the design, iteration of a series of design documents (high, medium and low level) and the team dynamics of communication, critique and integration.  The goal of the class is to have the small teams use the concepts and the tools taught in class to create a complete design document that will be cataloged.   Sophomore level or above.

NEW FOR FA2018! INFO 490 DC:  The Video Game Development Process.  Instructor is Dan Cermak.   CRN = 70697.  Tues/Thurs, 5 – 6:30 pm in 2078 NHB.
The emphasis of this course is understanding the video game development process as seen in current Game Studios. The course will focus on key elements of the process including each phase of the development timeline, scheduling, prototyping, iteration, QA, game builds and player research. Students will form small teams (4-6 with the goal of using the concepts taught in class to create a video game from a catalog of pre-existing designs. Considering the limited time frame of the semester, the state of the final product is not as important as understanding the game develop cycle. Prerequisites: Knowledge of a programming engine (preferably Unity).  Sophomore level or above.

NEW FOR FA2018! INFO 490 A: Makerspace Studio 2.  Instructor is Emilie Butt.  CRN = 65245.  Wed 3 – 5:50 pm in the FabLab.
This course is a foray into game studies via makerspace production mediums. Students will study the role of play, tinkering and gaming in design, research and innovation and be challenged to learn a variety of makerspace production tools and techniques to create games. This course will include three major components (1) physical board game design, (2) introductory computer game design and (3) investigation into the narrative themes, artistic production, interaction mechanics and culture that make games engaging. Class will meet in the CU Community Fab Lab in Art Annex II. Students who have taken a makerspace class before are encouraged to enroll. This section is for undergraduate students only.   Section AG (CRN 68913) is for graduate students.

INFO 490 JP: Designing and Programming Text Based Games and Simulations.  Instructor is Judith Pintar.  CRN 65396.  Wed 12:00 – 2:20 pm in 172 Armory.
In this course, you will be introduced to the “design work” of game authoring, and will apply these theoretical ideas to specific programming practices and skills. You will become proficient in Inform 7, a programming language and design system for interactive fiction (IF), and text-based computer games and simulations. By the end of the semester you will have developed a game or literary work of IF, and made a substantive contribution to a team-written, historical simulation project, dramatically recreating a key moment in Illinois history. This class meets with CWL 461 JP. No prior programming knowledge is required for students to be successful in the course. Students will be expected to bring a laptop to class. Sophomore level or above.

Social Services Panel – Friday, April 6

Alumni Panel: Social Services

We’ve invited three former Psychology students to talk about their journey and their current professions.

Join us on Friday, April 6, at 4:00 pm in Room 142 Psychology Building for a panel discussion.

Rebecca DarrWINGS – providing a pathway to independence for people whose lives have been disrupted by domestic violence

Angela MartinCunningham Children’s Home

Susan NelsonIllinois Department of Children and Family Services

Google Values Soft Skills

“The seven top characteristics of success at Google are all soft skills: being a good coach; communicating and listening well; possessing insights into others (including others different values and points of view); having empathy toward and being supportive of one’s colleagues; being a good critical thinker and problem solver; and being able to make connections across complex ideas.”

Sounds a lot like the skill set you develop in Psychology and LAS.

(STEM expertise is #8, and you get that with our major, as well!)

Read the article in today’s Washington Post.

 

Registration Restrictions

Hi all.

Some information on registration restrictions:

Some advanced Psychology courses will have restrictions lifted today (April 17). Others will be restricted to Psychology majors who are seniors, juniors, and sophomores until April 24. (If you are a Psychology freshman, you shouldn’t be registering for an advanced-level Psychology course!)

Information on restricted courses in selected majors:

Statistics

Computer Science

Economics

Many other departments have restrictions on their courses. Sometimes, this information is viewable in Class Schedule under “Section Info.” You can also contact the department offering the course to find out when restrictions might be lifted.